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Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
ellow afterwards recovered so far that, although he lost one of his eyes and was so severely wounded in the leg that he could not march on foot, he joined a cavalry company and did valiant service to the close of the war. It was a touching scene to see the fifth brother, himself severely wounded, ministering to his brother who was supposed to be mortally hurt, and preparing the bodies of his two dead brothers to send home to his widowed mother. And I remember five other brothers in the Orange C. H. Company, two of whom were killed and one wounded in this battle, and all of whom were killed before the close of the war. We were very illy provided with hospital stores, many of our surgeons were inexperienced, some of them utterly incompetent; and my heart bleeds afresh at the remembrance of the sufferings of our poor fellows, which might have been sooner alleviated with a better organization. And if the sufferings of our own men were greatthose of the large number of the wounded of
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
catch you. But, perhaps, the grimmest joke of the occasion was the one which General Lee got off at the expense of General Magruder--as gallant a gentleman as ever drew sabre, and one whose courtly manners won for him the soubriquet of Prince John. Magruder had been unfortunate the day before; his guide had misdirected him and he got up. late and his attack was made at too late an hour to secure promised support. Yet he felt that his brave fellows, who had so long baffled McClellan at Yorktown, were capable of driving him from Malvern Hill, and he burned for the privilege of trying it again. Accordingly, about two o'clock in the morning, the day after the battle, he sought General Lee and said: General, I came to submit a proposition to you. If you. will allow me to charge those heights at daybreak with my whole command, I pledge you my honor as a soldier to carry them at the point of the bayonet. General Lee replied with that quiet twinkle which always betokened something go
New Bridge (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
operating on the north side of the Chickahominy from those under himself and General Huger on the south side. * * * The troops on the two sides of the river were only separated until we succeeded in occupying the position near what is known as New Bridge, which occurred before 12 o'clock M. on Friday, June 27th, and before the attack on the enemy at Gaines's Mill. From the time we reached the position referred to, I regarded communication between the two wings of our army as re-established. on Friday, and the New Bridge was sufficiently rebuilt to be passed by artillery on Friday night, and the one above it was used for the passage of wagons, ambulances and troops early on Saturday morning. Besides this, all other bridges above New Bridge, and all the fords above that point, were open to us. The simple truth is that the works in front of Richmond, as then manned, were impregnable to direct assault, and if McClellan had tried it he would have sustained a bloodier repulse than
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
nding, profoundly grateful to the only Giver of victories for the signal success with which he has blessed our arms, tenders his earnest thanks and congratulations to the army, by whose valor such splendid results have been achieved. On Thursday, June 26, the powerful and splendidly-equipped army of the enemy was intrenched in works vast in extent and formidable in character, within sight of our capital. To-day the remains of that confident and threatening host lie upon the banks of the James River, thirty miles from Richmond, seeking to recover, under the protection of his gun boats, from the effects of his series of disastrous defeats. * * * * The immediate fruits of our success are the relief of Richmond from a state of siege; therout of the great army that so long menaced its safety; many thousand prisoners, including officers of high rank, and the capture or destruction of thousands of arms, and fifty-one pieces of artillery. The service rendered to the country during this sho
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
planted them firmly on the enemy's flank and rear, and Malvern Hill and Harrison's Landing would never have become historic enemy from this field to the much stronger position of Malvern Hill. I have heard a number of our ablest military critics r would have been the bloody list filled up next day at Malvern Hill? This temporary eclipse of Jackson's genius was probab. McClellan had done something. He had concentrated on Malvern Hill his powerful artillery, and had so disposed his infantrthe strongest position yet assaulted by either army. Malvern Hill commanded all of the approaches to it and all of the sue after any more such victories. But the thunders of Malvern Hill and the groans of the wounded and the dying could not dMcClellan at Yorktown, were capable of driving him from Malvern Hill, and he burned for the privilege of trying it again. Aays in their report: The retreat of the army from Malvern Hill to Harrison's Bar was very precipitate. The troops, up
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
before the battles around Richmond, Dr. Dabney preached a sermon in which he took strong Calvinistic grounds on special Providence, and told the men that they need not dodge in the battle, since every shot and shell, and bullet, sped on its way under the guidance of a special Providence, and hit just where and just whom the loving Father, who watches the fall of the sparrow, and numbers the hairs on the heads of his saints, should direct. A distinguished officer told me that during the battletles, and you must pardon me for expressing my surprise that you should want to put a gate post between you and special Providence. The good Doctor at once retorted: No! Major, you misunderstand the doctrine I teach. And the truth is, that I regard this gate post as a special Providence, under present circumstances. Just before the opening of the battle two preachers who had come to see after friends in the army, ventured up to our front lines without realizing that they were liable to b
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
er causes, and Longstreet was held back until Jackson's guns should be heard. But just as General ents of corps or divisions. As the head of Jackson's column was moving rapidly forward to reach ountry, had not been sufficiently informed of Jackson's purpose, and was leading him on a road by Gusand) were standing as idle spectators until Jackson's Adjutant-General, Rev. R. L. Dabney, discov and replied: Too many cannon. But he called Jackson's attention to the fact that all of his artilwhelming odds, and with long doubtful result, Jackson's corps would have crossed White Oak Swamp atso interesting that I give the explanation of Jackson's warm personal friend and chosen biographer to experience this? The words that fell from Jackson's lips, as he lay down that night among his sand several very amusing incidents occurred. Jackson's chief of staff was Rev. Dr. R. L. Dabney, o heard at his expense. Soon after he came to Jackson, about the beginning of the Valley campaign, [1 more...]
Beaver Dam Creek, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
Lee's veterans occupied these same positions, Grant's powerful army surged against them in vain. General Lee sent the following dispatch to Richmond the night of the battle: Headquarters, June 27, 1862. His Excellency, President Davis: Mr. President,--Profoundly grateful to Almighty God for the signal victory granted to us, it is my pleasing task to announce to you the success achieved by this army to-day. The enemy was this morning driven from his strong position behind Beaver Dam Creek, and pursued to that behind Powhite Creek, and finally, after a severe contest of five hours, entirely repulsed from the field. Night put an end to the contest. I grieve to state that our loss in officers and men is great. We sleep on the field, and shall renew the contest in the morning. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, R. E. Lee, General. The reception of the news of our great victory at Cold Harbor and Gaines's Mill by the people of Richmond may be better imag
Grant (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
that the strong positions which Porter held, his skilfully constructed intrenchments, and the able handling of his powerful artillery went a long way towards making the odds greatly in his favor. I remember that on riding over the field the next day several of the positions seemed to me well nigh impregnable, and even Jackson exclaimed when he saw the position which Hood's Texans had carried: These men are soldiers indeed! Two years later, when Lee's veterans occupied these same positions, Grant's powerful army surged against them in vain. General Lee sent the following dispatch to Richmond the night of the battle: Headquarters, June 27, 1862. His Excellency, President Davis: Mr. President,--Profoundly grateful to Almighty God for the signal victory granted to us, it is my pleasing task to announce to you the success achieved by this army to-day. The enemy was this morning driven from his strong position behind Beaver Dam Creek, and pursued to that behind Powhite Cree
Westover (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.112
General Lee, that you might hurt my little friend Major Kidder Meade; our friends, the enemy, left some time ago, and he is over there reconnoitring. The testimony of all the army correspondents, of citizens along the route, and of the officers of the Army of the Potomac themselves, is that the retreat to Harrison's Landing was very precipitate, and that the army arrived there in a very demoralized condition. Stuart got possession of the heights which completely commanded the camps at Westover, and which, if occupied and entrenched by infantry and artillery, would have compelled McClellen to surrender at discretion all of the men he could not hurriedly send off on transports. General Stuart's Notes on the war, on file in the archives of the Southern Historical Society, prove this. But it may be best to show it from Federal authority. General McClellan wrote to the Adjutant-General, at Washington, on the night of the battle of Malvern Hill, as follows: My men are complete
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