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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
, Eighteenth, Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Texas dismounted cavalry, consolidated, Major W. A. Taylor commanding, on the right. The remaining regiment of the brigade, the Seventh Texas, Captain C. E. Talley commanding, I sent to the top of the right-hand hill, with instructions to keep out of view, but watch well the right flank of its brigade at the foot. On the precipitous hill to the left of the gap and creek, I placed the Sixteenth Alabama, Major F. A. Ashford commanding, of Lowry's Alabama and Mississippi brigade, with instructions to conceal itself and guard well the left flank. I also sent on the face of this hill, fronting Ringgold, three companies of the Sixth and Seventh Arkansas consolidated, of Liddell's Arkansas brigade, under charge of Lieutenant Dulin, of General Liddell's staff. For the defence of the gap itself I disposed the rest of the Arkansas brigade, under command of Colonel D. C. Govan. The Fifth and Thirteenth Arkansas, consolidated, Colonel John E. Mu
Taylor's Ridge (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
wo or three thousand inhabitants, stands on a plain between the East Chicamauga river and the range of hills known as Taylor's Ridge. It is on the Western and Atlantic railroad, about twenty miles southeast of Chattanooga. Taylor's Ridge, which riTaylor's Ridge, which rises up immediately back of the town, runs in a northerly and southerly direction. Opposite the town the ridge is intersected by a narrow gap which admits the railroad, a wagon road, and a good sized creek, a tributary of the Chicamauga. The creekconstantly reinforcing, made another powerful effort to crown the ridge still further to the right. A peculiarity of Taylor's Ridge is the wavy conformation of its north side. The enemy, moving up in a long line of battle, suddenly concentrated oppckenridge and Wheeler, both of whom were present, lending me their personal assistance, I determined to withdraw from Taylor's Ridge, and take up a new position on some wooded hills one mile in rear. About 1 o'clock P. M., I rebuilt the screen in
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
gap is about half a mile through, but the plain immediatly in front of its east or rear mouth is so cut up by the windings of the creek that three bridges, or three fords, have to be crossed in the first half mile of road leading from the gap to Dalton. It will be perceived at once that this was a dangerous position to be caught in, if the enemy should succeed in turning either flank. The gap and the hills on either hand are thickly wooded, except the base of the right-hand hill, along whicalry retreated through the gap at a trot, and the valley in front was clear of our troops, but close in rear of the ridge our immense train was still in full view, struggling through the fords of the creek and the deeply cut — up roads leading to Dalton, and my division, silent, but cool and ready, was the only barrier between it and the flushed and eager advance of the pursuing Federal army. Shortly after 8 o'clock A. M. the enemy's skirmishers were in view, advancing. They opened fire, and
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
ully, (Signed), Geo. W. Brent, A. A. General. Major-General Cleburne. Leaving staff officers to conduct the troops across the river to the position designated, I went forward myself to examine the ground and form a plan for its defense. The town of Ringgold, a place of two or three thousand inhabitants, stands on a plain between the East Chicamauga river and the range of hills known as Taylor's Ridge. It is on the Western and Atlantic railroad, about twenty miles southeast of Chattanooga. Taylor's Ridge, which rises up immediately back of the town, runs in a northerly and southerly direction. Opposite the town the ridge is intersected by a narrow gap which admits the railroad, a wagon road, and a good sized creek, a tributary of the Chicamauga. The creek hugs the southernmost or left-hand hill as you face Ringgold. The wagon road and railroads run close to the creek. At its western mouth, next to Ringgold, the gap widens out to a breadth of over a hundred yards,
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
the retreat of the Army of Tennessee, from Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, to Ringgold, Ga., my division covered the retreat of Hardee's corps, arriving safely on the d myself to examine the ground and form a plan for its defense. The town of Ringgold, a place of two or three thousand inhabitants, stands on a plain between the Ee Chicamauga. The creek hugs the southernmost or left-hand hill as you face Ringgold. The wagon road and railroads run close to the creek. At its western mouth, next to Ringgold, the gap widens out to a breadth of over a hundred yards, leaving room for a patch of level wood land on each side of the roads. The gap is about and guard well the left flank. I also sent on the face of this hill, fronting Ringgold, three companies of the Sixth and Seventh Arkansas consolidated, of Liddell's oss. By this time the enemy had concentrated a large portion of his army at Ringgold, and was doubtless preparing to throw an overwhelming force on my flanks. He
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
lly conceal them from view, and made the artillerymen shelter themselves in the ravine close by. The remaining three regiments of Lowry's brigade, consisting of the Thirty-second and Forty-fifth Mississippi regiments, consolidated, under command of Colonel A. B. Hardcastle; Thirty-third Alabama, under command of Colonel Samuel Adams, and the Forty-fifth Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel H. D. Lamplay, commanding, I placed in reserve in the centre of the gap. The portion of Polk's Tennessee and Arkansas brigade with me, consisting of the First Arkansas, Colonel J. W. Colquitt commanding; the Second Tennessee, Colonel W. A. Robinson commanding; and the Third and Fifth Confederate regiments, consolidated, under Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Cole, I ordered to take position temporarily near the rear mouth of the gap, with directions to observe my right flank and prevent the enemy from turning me in that quarter. I had scarcely half an hour to make these dispositions when I was informed the enem
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
s to effectually conceal them from view, and made the artillerymen shelter themselves in the ravine close by. The remaining three regiments of Lowry's brigade, consisting of the Thirty-second and Forty-fifth Mississippi regiments, consolidated, under command of Colonel A. B. Hardcastle; Thirty-third Alabama, under command of Colonel Samuel Adams, and the Forty-fifth Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel H. D. Lamplay, commanding, I placed in reserve in the centre of the gap. The portion of Polk's Tennessee and Arkansas brigade with me, consisting of the First Arkansas, Colonel J. W. Colquitt commanding; the Second Tennessee, Colonel W. A. Robinson commanding; and the Third and Fifth Confederate regiments, consolidated, under Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Cole, I ordered to take position temporarily near the rear mouth of the gap, with directions to observe my right flank and prevent the enemy from turning me in that quarter. I had scarcely half an hour to make these dispositions when I was inf
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
General P. R. Cleburne's report of battle of Ringgold Gap. Headquarters Cleburne's division, Tunnell Hill, Ga., Dec. 9, 1863. Colonel,--On the retreat of the Army of Tennessee, from Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, to Ringgold, Ga., my division covered the retreat of Hardee's corps, arriving safely on the west bank of the East Chicamauga river at 10 o'clock, P. M., on the 26th November. At this point the river had to be forded. It was nearly waist deep and the night was freezing cold. I therefore determined to postpone crossing until the morning, and bivouaced on the hills near by. At 3 o'clock, A. M., on the 29th, I received the following order, viz: General,--The general desires that you will take strong position in the gorge of the mountain and attempt to check pursuit of enemy. He must be punished until our trains and the rear of our troops get well advanced. The reports from the rear are meagre, and the general is not thoroughly advised of the state of thi
Tunnell Hill (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.11
General P. R. Cleburne's report of battle of Ringgold Gap. Headquarters Cleburne's division, Tunnell Hill, Ga., Dec. 9, 1863. Colonel,--On the retreat of the Army of Tennessee, from Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, to Ringgold, Ga., my division covered the retreat of Hardee's corps, arriving safely on the west bank of the East Chicamauga river at 10 o'clock, P. M., on the 26th November. At this point the river had to be forded. It was nearly waist deep and the night was freezing cold. I therefore determined to postpone crossing until the morning, and bivouaced on the hills near by. At 3 o'clock, A. M., on the 29th, I received the following order, viz: General,--The general desires that you will take strong position in the gorge of the mountain and attempt to check pursuit of enemy. He must be punished until our trains and the rear of our troops get well advanced. The reports from the rear are meagre, and the general is not thoroughly advised of the state of thi
reserve in the centre of the gap. The portion of Polk's Tennessee and Arkansas brigade with me, consistingidge in that quarter. I instantly notified Brigadier-General Polk, stationed in the rear of the gap, to ascene and meet this attempt of the enemy. Luckily General Polk had already heard of this movement from a breathLowry to move his command up the hill and assist General Polk in defending that position. Moving rapidly aheat up the two remaining regiments of his brigade, and Polk the two other regiments of his command. The enemy, wavy surface, and rushed up it in heavy column. General Polk, with the assistance of General Lowry, as quickles and captured. Apprehending another attack, General Polk rapidly threw up some slight defenses in his frother pursuit of our army. I took into the fight, in Polk's brigade, 545; Lowry's brigade, 1,330; Smith's Texaas far as I know, did his whole duty. To Brigadier Generals Polk and Lowry, and Colonels Govan and Granbury
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