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Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.50
ll-armed to fill that want. From the first battle of Manassas, where Jackson won his sobriquet of Stonewall, in the East and in the West, the guns of the Washington Artillery were heard wherever battles were fought. In the ever memorable campaign of the Shenandoah, where Jackson, with the swoop of the eagle, attacked the divided columns of the enemy, and, beating them in succession, drove his vast host from our soil, the sons of Louisiana were a staff on which he securely leaned. At Port Republic, a battle as noticeable for the strategy which preceded it as for the daring and resolution by which it was characterized, Jackson in making the disposition of his forces, assigned an important duty to the Louisiana brigade commanded by General Dick Taylor. This was to gain a position on the mountain side above the enemy's most effective battery and descend to attack him in flank and reverse. After Taylor had put his troops in motion, he went to receive from Jackson his final orders.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7.50
seen the height of military fame to which the quiet professor would reach. He rose with the brilliancy of a meteor over the blood-stained fields of the Potomac, but shone with the steady light of the orb of day, a light around which no evening shadows gathered, but grew brighter and brighter the longer it shone. It is not alone by us that his merit has been recognized. In Europe, so far as I had opportunity to learn, he was regarded as the great hero of our war, and appreciative men in England have contributed the bronze statue to him, the first and only one which they have given to one of our soldiers. The column which stands before me, crowned with a statue of enduring stone, which you have reared to commemorate his services and virtues, is a fit tribute from you, and teaches a useful lesson to posterity, because it is erected not to perpetuate the story of his military prowess merely, but also, and perhaps even more, to record his pure patriotism, his piety and private worth.
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.50
iana Division, Army of Northern Virginia, it becomes my pleasing duty to accept from your hands this handsome tomb and sculptured shaft, designed to perpetuate the memory of those who fought and fell for the Lost Cause, and at the same time a fitting place of rest for those who must soon follow. Most of your old comrades are scattered over the battle fields of Virginia, from Manassas to Appomattox, sleeping quietly on its mountains and in its valleys. Some you left on the banks of the James river, the Chickahominy, the Rappahannock, the Shenandoah and the Potomac; many in places long since forgotten, with nothing left to mark the spot, except perhaps, in some lonely place in that beautiful valley of the Shenandoah, under the shadow of the Blue Ridge, Nature's kind hand may have planted in spring time a lily, pure and white as angel's hands, which stands as a sentinel drinking dews from heaven, and bowing its head in grief at night to kiss the spot, and with the first greeting of t
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.50
cord of this grand historic occasion. The Louisiana Division, Army of Northern Virginia Association, with a zeal and enterprising liberality worthy of all praise, had completed their tomb, which has vaults capable of receiving twenty-five hundred of their dead comrades, mounted upon it the statue of their old commander, Stonewall Jackson, and invited Mrs. Jackson and Miss Julia, President Davis, General Fitz. Lee, their comrades of the Army of Tennessee Association, the Lee Association of Mobile, and a number of others, to be present on the occasion. Accordingly, on the afternoon of the 10th, a crowd numbering from twelve to fifteen thousand assembled in the beautiful Metairie Cemetery. The vast throng occupying the comfortable seats, arranged amphitheatre style, or standing in the open space, the beautiful granite shaft decorated with Confederate flags and floral designs of most exquisite taste and beauty, the Guard of honor, composed of nineteen disabled veterans of the Army o
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.50
fter the organization of that Virginia Association, a branch division was organized in the State of Louisiana, which we have named the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, Louisiana Division.Louisiana Division. This occurred in September, 1875. Since that time we have had three presidents--Major E. D. Willett, the first, Governor Frank Nicholls, the second, and Major J. B. Richardson, the third. Our oo name of living man shall be placed on it. The simple inscription, Army of Northern Virginia, Louisiana division, tells its own story. If you wish more look on the other side of the die — there is r such a testimonial, for the fame of Jackson is closely identified with the heroic history of Louisiana. In the beginning of the war the Confederate States were wanting in all the material needfu of the enemy, and, beating them in succession, drove his vast host from our soil, the sons of Louisiana were a staff on which he securely leaned. At Port Republic, a battle as noticeable for the
d increase or adorn it. When he came from the academic shades of the Virginia Military Institute, who could have foreseen the height of military fame to which the quiet professor would reach. He rose with the brilliancy of a meteor over the blood-stained fields of the Potomac, but shone with the steady light of the orb of day, a light around which no evening shadows gathered, but grew brighter and brighter the longer it shone. It is not alone by us that his merit has been recognized. In Europe, so far as I had opportunity to learn, he was regarded as the great hero of our war, and appreciative men in England have contributed the bronze statue to him, the first and only one which they have given to one of our soldiers. The column which stands before me, crowned with a statue of enduring stone, which you have reared to commemorate his services and virtues, is a fit tribute from you, and teaches a useful lesson to posterity, because it is erected not to perpetuate the story of his m
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7.50
ve reared to commemorate his services and virtues, is a fit tribute from you, and teaches a useful lesson to posterity, because it is erected not to perpetuate the story of his military prowess merely, but also, and perhaps even more, to record his pure patriotism, his piety and private worth. No place could have been more appropriate than this for such a testimonial, for the fame of Jackson is closely identified with the heroic history of Louisiana. In the beginning of the war the Confederate States were wanting in all the material needful for its prosecution, and there was nothing which it was more difficult to supply than field batteries. Then the Washington Artillery came full-armed to fill that want. From the first battle of Manassas, where Jackson won his sobriquet of Stonewall, in the East and in the West, the guns of the Washington Artillery were heard wherever battles were fought. In the ever memorable campaign of the Shenandoah, where Jackson, with the swoop of the eag
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.50
proportions, and on reverse sides are the following simple and appropriate inscriptions: Army of Northern Virginia, Louisiania division, and from Manassas to Appomattox, 1861 to 1865. The statue itself is eight feet nine inches high, and the remark of an old soldier present, as the veil was drawn aside, but echoed the univer of Northern Virginia, Louisiana division, tells its own story. If you wish more look on the other side of the die — there is the whole story: From Manassas to Appomattox, 1861-1865. Remarks of President John B. Richardson.Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Tomb Committee: On behalf of the members of the Louisiana Division, ame time a fitting place of rest for those who must soon follow. Most of your old comrades are scattered over the battle fields of Virginia, from Manassas to Appomattox, sleeping quietly on its mountains and in its valleys. Some you left on the banks of the James river, the Chickahominy, the Rappahannock, the Shenandoah and th
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 7.50
e with Stuart in his perilous campaigns, shared his toils and dangers, took part in his victories, and became the worthy successor of that immortal chieftain. When the Army of Northern Virginia made its last march to Appomattox Court-house, a numerous foe hovering on his flanks and rear, little Fitz was there with the remnant of his cavalry to do and dare, and, if need be, die for Dixie. How vain it would be for any one to add to what has been said by such a witness. Again, and lastly, Jackson's character and conduct so filled the measure of his glory that no encomium could increase or adorn it. When he came from the academic shades of the Virginia Military Institute, who could have foreseen the height of military fame to which the quiet professor would reach. He rose with the brilliancy of a meteor over the blood-stained fields of the Potomac, but shone with the steady light of the orb of day, a light around which no evening shadows gathered, but grew brighter and brighter the
W. R. Lyman (search for this): chapter 7.50
, and Mrs. Jackson pronounces it a very fine likeness. After prayer by Rev. Father D. Hubert, the veteran Chaplain, the tomb and statue were presented by Captain W. R. Lyman, Chairman of the Committee, and received by Colonel J. B. Richardson, President of the Louisiana Division, Army of Northern Virginia, in brief speeches, which we give in full: Remarks of Captain Lyman.Mr. President and Members of the Army of Northern Virginia: In the execution of the trust which you committed to us as a committee from your body to erect a monument and tomb to the memory of Stonewall Jackson and his men, we are here to-day to show you the result of our work,rs — and that the following committee were untiring in their efforts to entertain their guests, and to make the whole affair a grand success: Tomb Committee: W. R. Lyman, I. L. Lyons, L. A. Adam, F. A. Ober, J. H. Murray, J. B. Sinnot, J. B. Richardson, Joe. Buckner, D. R. Calder, E. D. Willett. We were most reluctantly compe
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