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Bayou Rapides (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
dience to general artillery orders not to reply to the fire of the iron-plated monitors, and our whole fire was directed on the eight-gun gunboat. On the 28th of April, General Majors, with his division, attacked and drove the enemy on the Bayou Rapides road back towards Alexandria, and Major Semmes took McMahon's battery with him to support the movement. Captain McMahon gallantly performed his part, moving his battery to the front and firing on the enemy repeatedly, at 600 and 800 yards, with considerable effect. From the 2nd to the 8th May inclusive, Captain Mosely, with his battery, reporting to Brigadier-General Steele, was engaged in many affairs with the enemy on Bayou Rapides. On the 5th and 7th, at Middle Bayou, Graham's and Long's, he was of efficient service in checking advances of the enemy made in great force. On the 6th and 7th, Captain H. C. West, with his battery, also reported to Brigadier-General Steele. On the 7th, Mosely's and West's batteries cover
Benton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
in Cornay's four guns. He also says that the Cricket was struck thirty-eight times with shells and solid shot, and that she and the Juliet and Hindman lost forty-seven killed and wounded. J. L. B. May, 1867. On the morning of the 26th of April two gunboats of the enemy, one an iron plated monitor, supposed to be the Osage, and the other of the class called tin-clad, mounting eight guns and protected by about an inch of iron, were discovered lying near De Loach's Bluff in Red river. Benton's Rifle section, Captain Benton, commanding, and Nettles's Smooth-bore section, Lieutenant Smith, commanding, (Captain Nettles present), supported by Major Williams, with a battalion of sharpshooters, were placed in position and opened fire on the tin-clad, who, after severe punishment, rapidly fled after an engagement of thirty minutes. The iron plated monitor poured a heavy enfilading fire on the artillery and its support, but no attention was paid to it, in obedience to general artille
Alexandria (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
ice of Captain Cornay's four guns. He also says that the Cricket was struck thirty-eight times with shells and solid shot, and that she and the Juliet and Hindman lost forty-seven killed and wounded. J. L. B. May, 1867. On the morning of the 26th of April two gunboats of the enemy, one an iron plated monitor, supposed to be the Osage, and the other of the class called tin-clad, mounting eight guns and protected by about an inch of iron, were discovered lying near De Loach's Bluff in Red river. Benton's Rifle section, Captain Benton, commanding, and Nettles's Smooth-bore section, Lieutenant Smith, commanding, (Captain Nettles present), supported by Major Williams, with a battalion of sharpshooters, were placed in position and opened fire on the tin-clad, who, after severe punishment, rapidly fled after an engagement of thirty minutes. The iron plated monitor poured a heavy enfilading fire on the artillery and its support, but no attention was paid to it, in obedience to ge
McNutt's Hill, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
30 miles distant, at 1 A. M., 24th instant, and at 12 M., same day, were ordered to march to Carroll Jones's, 20 miles distant, which was accomplished by sun-down. The batteries were here halted, by order of General Bee, and did not reach McNutt's hill until the enemy's train had passed, but Major Semmes took McMahon's and West's batteries into the plain and skirmished with the enemy. The endurance exhibited by Major Semmes and his command of artillery has not been surpassed in this or ae for him, he has been present in the various engagements in. which his batteries have taken part, and his skill and cheerful courage have always imparted additional vigor to our fire. Major Squires reported to me for duty while we were at McNutt's Hill, and was assigned to the command of the reserve battalion of the army, and exhibited in the subsequent operations at Marksville, Mansura, and the bloody combat at Norwood, the high soldierly qualities to be expected from one who had served wi
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
At sunrise on the 5th instant, the United States transport Warner, convoyed by the United States gunboats Signal and Covington, each mounting eight guns, came down from Alexandria and attempted to run past the battery. They succeeded, with consiis pieces and ran them by hand out on the open bank, in 350 yards of the gunboats, and first directed his fire upon the Covington. Here occurred one of the most marvelous incidents of this extraordinary campaign. These two gunboats, attacked above breasts of our men over-matched the heavy artillery and iron-clad bulwarks of the gunboats. At last the boiler of the Covington was exploded by shot from the battery, and she was fired and abandoned by the crew, and soon after blew up. Lieutenant of the gunboat Signal, consisting of eight guns, and when the river falls will be able to secure the eight guns of the Covington. Lieutenant Yoist, commanding this battery, reports that he at all times received effective, willing and gallant sup
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
the blockade with the aid of their entire army and iron-clad fleet combined. On the 12th inst., Major Squires placed Winchester's (formerly Faries) four rifled pieces, near Mme. Davids on Red river. Shortly after reaching there, an iron-plated gu: Major Semmes, Chief of Artillery of Wharton's corps, having command on our right, placed in position H. C. West's and Winchester's batteries, of Squires's battalion, Major Squires commanding; McMahon, Mosely's and J. A. A. West's of his, Lennies baadiness indicative of admirable courage and resolution. On the 17th instant, McMahon's battery, the rifle section of Winchester's, commanded by Lieutenant Gaudet, and a six-pounder gun of H. C. West's battery, commanded by Lieutenant DuMay, openedod, the artillery again became engaged under the immediate command of Major Semmes. Squires's battalion, consisting of Winchester's and H. C. West's batteries, Mosely's, McMahon's, J. A. A. West's, Val. Verde, and Faries's batteries under him, consi
Marksville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
twenty-four rounds. She immediately backed up behind a point of the river bank, and the iron-clad being nearly at the point our guns were promptly and skilfully withdrawn. On the 15th inst., these guns were employed in heavy skirmishing near Marksville and Mansura. On the 16th inst., Major-General Wharton determined to make a temporary stand and force the enemy to display his force. At the request of Major-General Wharton, I made a reconnoissance of the country near Mansura and recommenderage have always imparted additional vigor to our fire. Major Squires reported to me for duty while we were at McNutt's Hill, and was assigned to the command of the reserve battalion of the army, and exhibited in the subsequent operations at Marksville, Mansura, and the bloody combat at Norwood, the high soldierly qualities to be expected from one who had served with such distinction in the army of Northern Virginia. Major Faries, Chief of Artillery of Polignac's division, only took comman
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
and two twelve-pounder Howitzers, reached the southern bank of Red river, and immediately commenced skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry. On the 3d May the United States transport, City Belle, having on board the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio regiment, came up the river, and was engaged by the battery and sharp-shooters. The soners were captured. The battery was then divided, one section being three miles from the other, but both on the river. At sunrise on the 5th instant, the United States transport Warner, convoyed by the United States gunboats Signal and Covington, each mounting eight guns, came down from Alexandria and attempted to run past thUnited States gunboats Signal and Covington, each mounting eight guns, came down from Alexandria and attempted to run past the battery. They succeeded, with considerable loss, in passing the upper section, and with the Warner in lead, unexpectedly encountered the lower section, commanded by Lieutenant Lyne, and so rapid was his fire that in fifteen minutes the Warner surrendered. The gunboats retired before the effective fire of these two guns and soug
Lecompte (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
aptain Benton, reporting to Brigadier-General Bee, after a night march of twenty-two miles, engaged the advance of the enemy at Polk's plantation, and punished him severely. He held one position with sufficient tenacity to enable him to fire canister upon the advancing enemy. On the 6th May his battery covered the crossing of the cavalry when driven over Polk's bridge; and Captain Benton reports that he only crossed the bridge in rear of the cavalry. Just before our forces fell back to Lecompte, this battery was exposed to a heavy and flank fire of the enemy's much more numerous artillery, and stubbornly sustained the engagement, until both rifle guns were disabled by rapid firing. In retiring, much coolness was observed in the officers and men in bringing off one of their howitzers, which had become disabled by the breaking of a linchpin, after all support had retired and while the enemy were advancing. The disabling of the rifle section of this battery accounts for its failure
Norwood, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.69
ery, the rifle section of Winchester's, commanded by Lieutenant Gaudet, and a six-pounder gun of H. C. West's battery, commanded by Lieutenant DuMay, opened with great effect on the flank of the enemy near Moreauville. On the 18th instant, at Norwood, the artillery again became engaged under the immediate command of Major Semmes. Squires's battalion, consisting of Winchester's and H. C. West's batteries, Mosely's, McMahon's, J. A. A. West's, Val. Verde, and Faries's batteries under him, con our fire. Major Squires reported to me for duty while we were at McNutt's Hill, and was assigned to the command of the reserve battalion of the army, and exhibited in the subsequent operations at Marksville, Mansura, and the bloody combat at Norwood, the high soldierly qualities to be expected from one who had served with such distinction in the army of Northern Virginia. Major Faries, Chief of Artillery of Polignac's division, only took command in the latter days of the campaign, and at
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