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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
ain and to show not only that General Sherman, in his several accounts, palpably contradicts himself, but that he is guilty of an unmistakable falsification of history. But meantime we will give him the benefit of the following characteristic letter: Washington, D. C., June 14, 1881. Capt. T. H. Lee: My Dear Friend,--I have your ardent and enthusiastic letter of June 13, and am glad you were pleased at my speech at the meeting last week of the Society of the Army of the Potomac at Hartford, Conn. I believe we have conquered the rebellion, and made possible the grand developments our country is already experiencing; and I believe we ought to write its history, and not allow those who surrendered to write their old worn-out theories and impose them on strangers as a truthful account of what they could not help. We must speak and write, else Europe will be left to infer that we conquered not by courage, skill and patriotic devotion, but by brute force and by cruelty. The reve
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
ld worn-out theories and impose them on strangers as a truthful account of what they could not help. We must speak and write, else Europe will be left to infer that we conquered not by courage, skill and patriotic devotion, but by brute force and by cruelty. The reverse was the fact. The rebels were notoriously more cruel than our men. We never could work up our men to the terrible earnestness of the Southern forces. Their murdering of Union fugitives, burning of Lawrence, Chambersburg, Paducah, etc., were all right in their eyes; and if we burned an old cotton gin or shed it was barbarism. I am tired of such perversion, and will resist it always. Truly your friend, W. T. Sherman. The rebels more cruel than Sherman's men! They burnt towns and General Sherman only an old cotton gin occasionally!! And this to prevent rebels from succeeding in their literary conspiracy to manufacture history !!! Will the reader please recall Esop's fable of the lamb who muddied the stream s
Lawrence, Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
endered to write their old worn-out theories and impose them on strangers as a truthful account of what they could not help. We must speak and write, else Europe will be left to infer that we conquered not by courage, skill and patriotic devotion, but by brute force and by cruelty. The reverse was the fact. The rebels were notoriously more cruel than our men. We never could work up our men to the terrible earnestness of the Southern forces. Their murdering of Union fugitives, burning of Lawrence, Chambersburg, Paducah, etc., were all right in their eyes; and if we burned an old cotton gin or shed it was barbarism. I am tired of such perversion, and will resist it always. Truly your friend, W. T. Sherman. The rebels more cruel than Sherman's men! They burnt towns and General Sherman only an old cotton gin occasionally!! And this to prevent rebels from succeeding in their literary conspiracy to manufacture history !!! Will the reader please recall Esop's fable of the lamb w
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
er — always blundering into success. General Sherman set fire to Columbia with his own hands, foolishly applying the torch before he had had any opportunity for plunder, while General Early burned his fingers in efforts to put out the fire at Chambersburg. General Butler stole all the silver spoons in New Orleans, but General Floyd was as honest as the day is long. He vigorously protests against what he characterizes as a sort of literary conspiracy on the part of Southern writers to gloriforce and by cruelty. The reverse was the fact. The rebels were notoriously more cruel than our men. We never could work up our men to the terrible earnestness of the Southern forces. Their murdering of Union fugitives, burning of Lawrence, Chambersburg, Paducah, etc., were all right in their eyes; and if we burned an old cotton gin or shed it was barbarism. I am tired of such perversion, and will resist it always. Truly your friend, W. T. Sherman. The rebels more cruel than Sherman'
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
spiracy to manufacture history !!! Will the reader please recall Esop's fable of the lamb who muddied the stream so the wolf could not drink? Or better still will he please read Sherman's Memoirs, Nichol's Great March to the sea, or the newspapers of that day. Since this question of the Conduct of the war has been revived we propose to take it up and ventilate it, when some choice extracts from General Sherman's orders will show the sincerity of his present utterances. Riding through South Carolina several years ago in company with a distinguished Confederate General he pointed to the chimneys of burnt houses and called them Sherman's sentinels left to guard the scenes of his vandalism, and alluding to his attempt to shirk the responsibility of burning Columbia, he said: If I had burned nineteen towns (as Sherman confesses he did) I should not care a straw if they did charge, or prove, I had burned the twentieth. But, perhaps, the explanation of General Sherman's anxiety is to b
Newtown (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
— the insurgents suffered the extreme penalty of the law, while in all others, like Shay's rebellion, Fries's, and the whiskey war, they were either pardoned outright or only very mildly punished. He also says sarcastically: The atrocities of Andersonville were explained into nothingness long ago. The boys in blue lay on flowery beds of ease within that spacious and airy stockade, listening dreamily to the purl of the crystal brook that babbled at their feet, while the boys in gray at Elmira were suffering the tortures of the Inquisition. Lee, who never won an offensive battle, was the great general of the war. Grant was a blunderer — always blundering into success. General Sherman set fire to Columbia with his own hands, foolishly applying the torch before he had had any opportunity for plunder, while General Early burned his fingers in efforts to put out the fire at Chambersburg. General Butler stole all the silver spoons in New Orleans, but General Floyd was as honest as t
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
s work one appears in the Atlantic for September and one in the North American Review. In the latter, the writer, Rossiter Johnson, refers to the fact that in the case of every insurrection against slavery — like Nat Turner's and John Brown's — the insurgents suffered the extreme penalty of the law, while in all others, like Shay's rebellion, Fries's, and the whiskey war, they were either pardoned outright or only very mildly punished. He also says sarcastically: The atrocities of Andersonville were explained into nothingness long ago. The boys in blue lay on flowery beds of ease within that spacious and airy stockade, listening dreamily to the purl of the crystal brook that babbled at their feet, while the boys in gray at Elmira were suffering the tortures of the Inquisition. Lee, who never won an offensive battle, was the great general of the war. Grant was a blunderer — always blundering into success. General Sherman set fire to Columbia with his own hands, foolishly apply<
etter of June 13, and am glad you were pleased at my speech at the meeting last week of the Society of the Army of the Potomac at Hartford, Conn. I believe we have conquered the rebellion, and made possible the grand developments our country is already experiencing; and I believe we ought to write its history, and not allow those who surrendered to write their old worn-out theories and impose them on strangers as a truthful account of what they could not help. We must speak and write, else Europe will be left to infer that we conquered not by courage, skill and patriotic devotion, but by brute force and by cruelty. The reverse was the fact. The rebels were notoriously more cruel than our men. We never could work up our men to the terrible earnestness of the Southern forces. Their murdering of Union fugitives, burning of Lawrence, Chambersburg, Paducah, etc., were all right in their eyes; and if we burned an old cotton gin or shed it was barbarism. I am tired of such perversion, a
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
although his new version of the burning of Columbia has been fully refuted by articles we had previously published [see vol. VII, pp. 156, 185 and 249, and vol. VIII, p. 202], we purpose, at an early day, to take up the question again and to show not only that General Sherman, in his several accounts, palpably contradicts himself, but that he is guilty of an unmistakable falsification of history. But meantime we will give him the benefit of the following characteristic letter: Washington, D. C., June 14, 1881. Capt. T. H. Lee: My Dear Friend,--I have your ardent and enthusiastic letter of June 13, and am glad you were pleased at my speech at the meeting last week of the Society of the Army of the Potomac at Hartford, Conn. I believe we have conquered the rebellion, and made possible the grand developments our country is already experiencing; and I believe we ought to write its history, and not allow those who surrendered to write their old worn-out theories and impose the
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.88
er Johnson (we are not informed what part he took in crushing the rebellion ), or any one else, points out any particular in which we have been guilty of a falsification of history, we promise to confess our error, and do all in our power to correct it. But, to be frank, we confess that we should be slow to accept the guidance of a man who shows such profound ignorance as to say that Lee never won an offensive battle, [we wonder what he calls Seven days around Richmond, Second Manassas, Chancellorsville, the first days in the Wilderness, Reams's Station, etc.?], and who shows a spirit that would revive the fabrications with which Northern writers flooded the world during and just after the war, and would remand the chief Rebels to prison, or the hangman. General Sherman Manufacturing history. We carefully preserved General Sherman's speech before the Army of the Potomac, and although his new version of the burning of Columbia has been fully refuted by articles we had previously p
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