hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 307 1 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 243 1 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 221 3 Browse Search
Bradley T. Johnson 192 14 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 188 14 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 179 1 Browse Search
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) 178 0 Browse Search
R. E. Rodes 165 1 Browse Search
John B. Hood 156 2 Browse Search
James Longstreet 151 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 399 total hits in 102 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Mulberry Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
agruder scarcely numbered eleven thousand men. Of this force about six thousand formed the garrisons of the intrenched camps at Gloucester Point, Yorktown and Mulberry Island, and the remainder were distributed on the line of the Warwick, a creek which headed within a mile of Yorktown, and flowing across the peninsula, here over twelve miles wide, emptied into the James at Mulberry Island, where batteries had been erected to command the river. The York was defended by a number of batteries at Gloucester Point and Yorktown, but as the majority of the guns in position were old naval thirty-two pounders, the strength of the position against a serious naval atts right flank on Skiff creek, a large and deep tributary of the James, an elbow of which here approached within a mile of the Warwick. The intrenched camp at Mulberry Island was left as an independent outwork, being difficult to attack by land. The enemy used his balloons constantly to overlook the Confederate positions, and seem
Peninsula (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
at Fortress Monroe, General Johnston was sent to examine the position at Yorktown, to decide whether it could be maintained. His report was unfavorable, being based on the dangers of the isolated position of Gloucester Point, and of a well conducted naval attack up the York, but it was nevertheless determined to hold the line as long as possible, as the possession of the Peninsula was considered necessary to the safety of Norfolk. The estimate formed by the enemy of the strength of the Peninsula line was very much at variance with the true state of the case. Gen. McClellan says in his report that to have attacked Yorktown by land would have been simple folly, and that as flag officer Goldsborough, of the Navy, reported it impossible to gather sufficient naval force to attempt it by water, and also impossible to advance up the James, on acount of the Merrimac, the only alternative left him was to take Yorktown by siege. On the 4th of April, General McClellan having arrived at
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
power; but some delay was made to reconnoitre the position and to open a battery, and this delay enabled Kershaw's and Semmes's brigades, of McLaws's division and Macon's battery, to regain the works by a long double-quick through the mud. A little long-range firing then ensued in reply to the Yankee artillery and carbines, until ition with one of his brigades. As his brigades were all small, two were sent, those of Anderson and Prior, by which the lines were occupied during the night with Macon's battery and two sections under Captains Garnett and McCarthy. On the morning of the 5th the bulk of the Confederate army, with its trains, was pushed forward division and the Yorktown road, on which Couch's, Kearney's and Casey's divisions were advancing. The advance of Webber's battery was met by so sharp a fire from Macon's four gun battery in Fort Magruder, and McCarthy's section, from a redoubt on the right, that, when at length the guns were unlimbered in the assigned positions,
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
arge part of the army expired, and they at once reenlisted for three years or the war. It might appear that this reenlistment was not voluntary, being performed under the Conscript Act of April 16th, 1862; but this very act was a favorite scheme in the army, and the army influence had no little weight in securing the passage of the bill. A few Kentucky troops, in the division of General G. W. Smith, alone opposed their own conscription on the ground that Kentucky was not one of the Confederate States, and they were, therefore, not citizens; but their opposition was principally based on a desire to transfer themselves to the army in Tennessee, where many troops from Kentucky were serving. Their claim of exemption was not allowed, but they were transferred to the West, as they desired. By the law of Congress, those regiments who anticipated conscription by re-enlisting, were entitled to reorganize and elect their own officers, and this reorganization and the elections were very g
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
Sketch of Longstreet's division — Yorktown and Williamsburg. By General E. P. Alexander. At the time of McClellan's arrival at Fortress Mo'clock P. M., on the 4th, when the rear of the infantry reached Williamsburg, twelve miles distant. Meanwhile McClellan had organized a vided by a strong force of cavalry and horse-artillery, marched on Williamsburg in pursuit. The movements of the Federal cavalry were so wellnfederate column just as its rear was filing into the streets of Williamsburg. Fort Magruder, and the adjoining Confederate entrenchments wert. The remainder of Longstreet's division was in bivouac beyond Williamsburg; General Longstreet simply standing on the defensive to cover thsion of General D. H. Hill, which was still within five miles of Williamsburg, and which was at once turned back. General Johnston also returhowitzers and three iron twelve-pounders, which had been sent to Williamsburg from Richmond just before the retreat, and were unprovided with
Skiffs creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
eavy shell at the surrounding camps. The sharp-shooters and the field artillery, however, on both sides, were more implacable than ever afterwards, except in the neighborhood of the mine at Petersburg in 1864, and a single man was scarcely able to show himself at any distance, without having some missile sent after him. Meanwhile the Confederate line was much strengthened and improved, as well as shortened, by being bent back from the Warwick at Lee's mill, and resting its right flank on Skiff creek, a large and deep tributary of the James, an elbow of which here approached within a mile of the Warwick. The intrenched camp at Mulberry Island was left as an independent outwork, being difficult to attack by land. The enemy used his balloons constantly to overlook the Confederate positions, and seemed to command a view of everything that was done, but, strange to say, the information from this source seems to be the most unreliable of all that misled the Federal commander as to his ad
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
n another favorable night, bringing very accurate returns of the enemy's force and full information of his siege operations. The dangers of the flank on York river, and perhaps some apprehensions of the effect upon his earthworks of the enemy's one hundred and two hundred pounder rifles and thirteen inch mortars, decided General Johnston not to undergo the risks of a siege in which the weight of metal would be so vastly against him. It has been claimed that the sieges of Vicksburg, Port Hudson and Petersburg have demonstrated that the lines of Yorktown could have been held, in spite of the powerful array of artillery which was prepared against them, and that, therefore, Johnston's retreat was unnecessary. There is no doubt that they could have been held against all front attacks for a long time, but the enemy had other armies in the field, operating against Richmond, and it would certainly have been bad policy to have left the main body of the Confederate army in such a cul de
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
ng performed under the Conscript Act of April 16th, 1862; but this very act was a favorite scheme in the army, and the army influence had no little weight in securing the passage of the bill. A few Kentucky troops, in the division of General G. W. Smith, alone opposed their own conscription on the ground that Kentucky was not one of the Confederate States, and they were, therefore, not citizens; but their opposition was principally based on a desire to transfer themselves to the army in Tennessee, where many troops from Kentucky were serving. Their claim of exemption was not allowed, but they were transferred to the West, as they desired. By the law of Congress, those regiments who anticipated conscription by re-enlisting, were entitled to reorganize and elect their own officers, and this reorganization and the elections were very generally made during the siege of Yorktown. Very great changes of officers, particularly of Captains and Lieutenants, resulted from these electio
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
rsuit, and one which, had it not failed at the fighting point, would have put the Confederate army in a very critical condition. The divisions of Franklin, Sedgwick, Porter and Richardson, were sent in steamers up the York to the vicinity of West Point, to cut off Johnston's retreat. The divisions of Hooker, Smith, Kearney, Couch and Casey, preceded by a strong force of cavalry and horse-artillery, marched on Williamsburg in pursuit. The movements of the Federal cavalry were so well conduunders, which had been sent to Williamsburg from Richmond just before the retreat, and were unprovided with horses. As General Johnston expected to be attacked by the divisions which McClellan had thrown ahead of him at Eltham's Landing near West Point, the march was hurried as much as possible, and on the 7th the whole army was concentrated at Barhamsville. Franklin's division and one brigade of Sedgwick's having landed during the morning, General Franklin sent out Newton's brigade as a fee
Rochambeau Village (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
was by no means secure from assault, and standing timber and neighboring ravines offered sheltered approaches to within very short distance of the works. Below Lee's mill, six miles from Yorktown, no roads crossed the Warwick, and the tide ebbed and flowed in its channel. Above this point three dams, each defended by a slight ea to his command, which was styled the Central forces. General Magruder's division held the Warwick below Longstreet's right, and embracing dam number one and Lee's mill. The division of General Smith was held in reserve, portions of it occasionally relieving brigades in the trenches at exposed points. The actual hostilitiing some missile sent after him. Meanwhile the Confederate line was much strengthened and improved, as well as shortened, by being bent back from the Warwick at Lee's mill, and resting its right flank on Skiff creek, a large and deep tributary of the James, an elbow of which here approached within a mile of the Warwick. The intre
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...