hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 307 1 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 243 1 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 221 3 Browse Search
Bradley T. Johnson 192 14 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 188 14 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 179 1 Browse Search
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) 178 0 Browse Search
R. E. Rodes 165 1 Browse Search
John B. Hood 156 2 Browse Search
James Longstreet 151 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 193 total hits in 76 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
s were disabled on the first day's action, one 3-in. rifle, Lieutenant Wallace's, being struck upon its face, which was sent to the rear with the wagon; and one Whitworth having had an axle broken. The latter was taken to Major Duffie's train and repaired. The two Whitworth guns were moved Friday morning, by direction of LieutWhitworth guns were moved Friday morning, by direction of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill, to a commanding point north of the railroad cut, to enable them to enfilade the enemy's position; they fired it is believed with effect from this point. In the afternoon it was reported to me that the gun formerly disabled had broken its axle again, this time from its own firing. I immediately ordered itCourthouse, received no corn, subsisting entirely upon grass with a little sheaf oats and wheat. Ammunition expended in battle: Rounds of Napoleon213 Rounds of 3-inch rifle1,049 Rounds of Whitworth133 Respectfully forwarded, D. G. Mcintosh, Major Commanding. To Colonel R. L. Walker, Commanding Artillery Third Corps.
ed during the first days' action without any occasion for an active participation, though frequently under fire. The remaining battery of the command under Lieutenant Wallace was also placed in position near the Cashtown Pike, and contributed its portion of work. The artillery fire on both sides was occasionally brisk, but delibin considerable loss, Lieutenants Tullis and Ferrell, of Hurt's battery, being wounded. Two guns were disabled on the first day's action, one 3-in. rifle, Lieutenant Wallace's, being struck upon its face, which was sent to the rear with the wagon; and one Whitworth having had an axle broken. The latter was taken to Major Duffie my notice when anyone flinched from the post of danger. Where all behaved so well, it is difficult to draw distinctions; yet, being nearest the company of Lieutenant Wallace, I can bear especial testimony to the coolness and gallantry of himself and men. I cannot forbear also paying a tribute to the handsome conduct of my Ordnan
R. L. Walker (search for this): chapter 2.17
veyed them all safely to camp, about a mile and a half from the river. The Whitworth guns, under Captain Hurt, were put in position near the bridge by General Pendleton, and several shots were fired from them at columns of the enemy's cavalry. Captain Hart, withdrawing by another road, rejoined the battalion at Bunker Hill. From Bunker Hill the battalion moved with General Anderson's division to Culpeper Courthouse. Annexed is a statement of casualties with amount of ammunition expended: Casualties in men killed and wounded24 Men captured16 Horses disabled and killed38 The horses, from the battle of Gettysburg to the time of reaching Culpeper Courthouse, received no corn, subsisting entirely upon grass with a little sheaf oats and wheat. Ammunition expended in battle: Rounds of Napoleon213 Rounds of 3-inch rifle1,049 Rounds of Whitworth133 Respectfully forwarded, D. G. Mcintosh, Major Commanding. To Colonel R. L. Walker, Commanding Artillery Third Corps.
ysburg, Captain Rice's battery in reserve. The enemy opened upon the spot at various times throughout the two succeeding days a terrible artillery fire accompanied with a galling fire of musketry from their sharpshooters. Our line remained quiet until a movement forward being made by the first corps a few rounds was fired by us to draw the enemy's attention which never failed to do so. The firing in the afternoon became extremely warm and continued, and resulted in considerable loss, Lieutenants Tullis and Ferrell, of Hurt's battery, being wounded. Two guns were disabled on the first day's action, one 3-in. rifle, Lieutenant Wallace's, being struck upon its face, which was sent to the rear with the wagon; and one Whitworth having had an axle broken. The latter was taken to Major Duffie's train and repaired. The two Whitworth guns were moved Friday morning, by direction of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill, to a commanding point north of the railroad cut, to enable them to enfilade
Jacob Thompson (search for this): chapter 2.17
was two killed and thirteen wounded, among the wounded Lieutenant Contee and Sergeant Glascock. This loss was confined to the two guns above spoken of, except in the case of one of the men killed, which was done on Saturday when not engaged. Sixteen horses were also killed and disabled, fifteen of these being in the same section. I desire to bring to your immediate notice on this occasion the names of Lieutenant C. S. Contee, commanding the section, Sergeant Harris, Corporals Compton and Thompson, of the first gun; Sergeant Glascock and Corporal May, of second gun. Captain Carpenter's battery, under command of Lieutenant Lambie, was served in the most efficient manner, both on the day on which we arrived in front of Winchester and the 15th instant. The Lieutenant finds difficulty in making any distinctions, but mentions Sergeant-Major Benjamin Karnes as having been in command of a section and having rendered excellent service. Captain Brown's battery was not engaged at any time
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.17
-I hereby beg leave to submit the following report of the operations of this battalion in the recent engagements around Winchester. On the morning of the 13th June we marched at 4 o'clock A. M. with Johnson's division from our encampment at Cedarvollowing the front brigade under immediate direction of Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews. This battery arrived in sight of Winchester about 12 o'clock M. Had it proceeded directly up the road it would have been subjected to the fire of a battery stationo'clock A. M., and moving towards that pike. The remainder of the battalion had been left under my command in front of Winchester. The batteries under command of Colonel Andrews were marching closed up on the infantry, and the first intimation of command of Lieutenant Lambie, was served in the most efficient manner, both on the day on which we arrived in front of Winchester and the 15th instant. The Lieutenant finds difficulty in making any distinctions, but mentions Sergeant-Major Benjamin
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.17
sey's brigade, to take position on the hill overlooking Waynesboro. Monday, the 5th, moved with the main column to Hagerstown and sent one battery to picket with Anderson's and one with Lane's division. On the 11th instant moved with General Anderson's division into line of battle, and took position designated near St. James College, which strong of itself, was well entrenched, but occupied without battle till the evening of the 13th, when I withdrew at dark by your order, moving to Williamsport and thence to Falling Waters, over the worst road and during the worst night of the season. The river was reached and crossed in safety about 9 A. M., the caissons having been sent on before under Lieutenant Price, who conveyed them all safely to camp, about a mile and a half from the river. The Whitworth guns, under Captain Hurt, were put in position near the bridge by General Pendleton, and several shots were fired from them at columns of the enemy's cavalry. Captain Hart, withdrawin
Emmitsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.17
the hotest fire and assisted in working at one of the guns. Saturday, the 4th, the same position was maintained with but little firing, and on the afternoon of that day, under orders from General Hill, I withdrew to Stone Bridge and awaited there the body of the corps, with which I moved to the village of Fairfield. Ordered here to report to General Anderson with two batteries, which I did, moving with his division, crossed the mountain before dark, leaving a section on the top, at the Emmitsburg road, and sending a battery at night with a regiment of Posey's brigade, to take position on the hill overlooking Waynesboro. Monday, the 5th, moved with the main column to Hagerstown and sent one battery to picket with Anderson's and one with Lane's division. On the 11th instant moved with General Anderson's division into line of battle, and took position designated near St. James College, which strong of itself, was well entrenched, but occupied without battle till the evening of t
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.17
appeared from the field. Previous to this time I had advanced two of my batteries to the intervening hollow, and followed close upon the enemy as he left the hills. No further movement was made during the day — the casualties being one man killed of Captain Johnson's, and one wounded of Captain Rice's by premature explosion, and several horses disabled. On Thursday morning, July 2d, the battallion was put in position behind a stone wall on the range of hills to the left of the town of Gettysburg, Captain Rice's battery in reserve. The enemy opened upon the spot at various times throughout the two succeeding days a terrible artillery fire accompanied with a galling fire of musketry from their sharpshooters. Our line remained quiet until a movement forward being made by the first corps a few rounds was fired by us to draw the enemy's attention which never failed to do so. The firing in the afternoon became extremely warm and continued, and resulted in considerable loss, Lieutenant
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.17
every battlefield, makes it unnecessary to speak of them on this particular occasion. I am, Major, very respecfully, your obedient servant, J. W. Latimer, Major commanding Andrews's Artillery Battalion. To Major B. W. Leigh, A. A. General Johnson's Division. Report of Major McIntosh. Headquarters McIntosh's battalion, Mitchell Station, July 30, 1863. Colonel:--I have the honor to submit the following report, as called for, of the operations of this battalion since leaving Fredericksburg, June 15, 1863. The command was moved from the latter place by way of Culpeper Courthouse, Front Royal, Shepherdstown, &c., to Cashtown, Penn., without incident worthy of special note. On the morning of Wednesday, July 1st, it moved with General Pender's division into the line of battle. One battery of Napoleon's (Captain Rice), and a section of Whitworth's, was placed first in position a short distance to the right of the turnpike, by the side of a portion of Major Pegram's battalion
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...