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Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
cal defense. . . . We can not deny that there is a Southern Confederacy, de facto, in existence, with its capital at Montgomery. We may regret it. I regret it most profoundly; but I can not deny the truth of the fact, painful and mortifying as it sent to Fort Sumter peaceably, or otherwise by force. (Signed) G. T. Beauregard. General G. T. Beauregard Montgomery, April 10th. General G. T. Beauregard, Charleston. If you have no doubt of the authorized character of the agent wh. P. Walker, Secretary of War. The demand will be made to-morrow at twelve o'clock. (Signed) G. T. Beauregard. Montgomery, April 10th. General Beauregard, Charleston. Unless there are especial reasons connected with your own condition, iAnderson, Major U. S. Army, commanding. To Brigadier-General G. T. Beauregard, Commanding Provisional Army, C. S. A. Montgomery, April 11th. General Beauregard, Charleston. We do not desire needlessly to bombard Fort Sumter, if Major Anderson w
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
Anderson, United States army, protesting against Fox's plan for relieving Fort Sumter. Fort Sumter, S. C., April 8, 1861. To Colonel L. Thomas, Adjutant-General United States Army. Colonel: I hfor twelve o'clock. (Signed) G. T. Beauregard. headquarters Provisional army, C. S. A., Charleston, S. C., April 11, 1861, 2 P. M. sir: The Government of the Confederate States has hitherto foajor Robert Anderson, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C. headquarters Fort Sumter, S. C., April 11, 1861. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communicMajor Robert Anderson, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C. headquarters Fort Sumter, S. C., 2:30 A. M., April 12, 1861. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yoommanding. To Brigadier-General G. T. Beauregard, Commanding Provisional Army, C. S. A. Fort Sumter, S. C., April 12, 1861, 3:20 A. M. sir: By authority of Brigadier-General Beauregard, commandi
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
ch had seceded, except those at Key West and the Dry Tortugas. In support of this resolution he said: We certainly can not justify the holding of forts there, much less the recapturing of those which have been taken, unless we intend to reduce those States themselves into subjection. I take it for granted, no man will deny the proposition, that whoever permanently holds Charleston and South Carolina is entitled to the possession of Fort Sumter. Whoever permanently holds Pensacola and Florida is entitled to the possession of Fort Pickens. Whoever holds the States in whose limits those forts are placed is entitled to the forts themselves, unless there is something peculiar in the location of some particular fort that makes it important for us to hold it for the general defense of the whole country, its commerce and interests, instead of being useful only for the defense of a particular city or locality. It is true that Forts Taylor and Jefferson, at Key West and Tortugas, are s
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
ion recommending the withdrawal of the garrisons from all forts within the limits of the states which had seceded, except those at Key West and the Dry Tortugas. In support of this resolution he said: We certainly can not justify the holding of forts there, much less the recapturing of those which have been taken, unless we intend to reduce those States themselves into subjection. I take it for granted, no man will deny the proposition, that whoever permanently holds Charleston and South Carolina is entitled to the possession of Fort Sumter. Whoever permanently holds Pensacola and Florida is entitled to the possession of Fort Pickens. Whoever holds the States in whose limits those forts are placed is entitled to the forts themselves, unless there is something peculiar in the location of some particular fort that makes it important for us to hold it for the general defense of the whole country, its commerce and interests, instead of being useful only for the defense of a particu
America (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
nformed that this expedition was to come. Colonel Lamon's remark convinced me that the idea, merely hinted at to me by Captain Fox, would not be carried out. The Count of Paris libels the memory of Major Anderson, and perverts the truth of history in this, as he has done in other particulars, by saying, with reference to the visit of Captain Fox to the fort, that, having visited Anderson at Fort Sumter, a plan had been agreed upon between them for revictualing the garrison.—Civil War in America, authorized translation, Vol. I, Chapt. IV, p. 137. Fox himself says, in his published letter, I made no arrangements with Major Anderson for supplying the fort, nor did I inform him of my plan; Major Anderson, in the letter above, says the idea had been merely hinted at by Captain Fox, and that Colonel Lamon had led him to believe that it had been abandoned. We shall strive to do our duty, thought I frankly say that my heart is not in this war, which I see is to be thus commenced.
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
al, and therefore important to us without reference to our relations with the seceded States. Not so with Moultrie, Johnson, Castle Pinckney, and Sumter, in Charleston Harbor; not so with Pulaski, on the Savannah River; not so with Morgan and other forts in Alabama; not so with those other forts that were intended to guard the entsir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, (Signed) G. T. Beauregard, Brigadier-General commanding. Major Robert Anderson, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C. headquarters Fort Sumter, S. C., April 11, 1861. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication demanding the evacuat, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) G. T. Beauregard, Brigadier-General commanding. Major Robert Anderson, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C. headquarters Fort Sumter, S. C., 2:30 A. M., April 12, 1861. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your second communication of t
Fort Jefferson (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
r permanently holds Pensacola and Florida is entitled to the possession of Fort Pickens. Whoever holds the States in whose limits those forts are placed is entitled to the forts themselves, unless there is something peculiar in the location of some particular fort that makes it important for us to hold it for the general defense of the whole country, its commerce and interests, instead of being useful only for the defense of a particular city or locality. It is true that Forts Taylor and Jefferson, at Key West and Tortugas, are so situated as to be essentially national, and therefore important to us without reference to our relations with the seceded States. Not so with Moultrie, Johnson, Castle Pinckney, and Sumter, in Charleston Harbor; not so with Pulaski, on the Savannah River; not so with Morgan and other forts in Alabama; not so with those other forts that were intended to guard the entrance of a particular harbor for local defense. . . . We can not deny that there is a So
Pulaski, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
at makes it important for us to hold it for the general defense of the whole country, its commerce and interests, instead of being useful only for the defense of a particular city or locality. It is true that Forts Taylor and Jefferson, at Key West and Tortugas, are so situated as to be essentially national, and therefore important to us without reference to our relations with the seceded States. Not so with Moultrie, Johnson, Castle Pinckney, and Sumter, in Charleston Harbor; not so with Pulaski, on the Savannah River; not so with Morgan and other forts in Alabama; not so with those other forts that were intended to guard the entrance of a particular harbor for local defense. . . . We can not deny that there is a Southern Confederacy, de facto, in existence, with its capital at Montgomery. We may regret it. I regret it most profoundly; but I can not deny the truth of the fact, painful and mortifying as it is. . . . I proclaim boldly the policy of those with whom I act. We are f
Key West (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
Sumter. Whoever permanently holds Pensacola and Florida is entitled to the possession of Fort Pickens. Whoever holds the States in whose limits those forts are placed is entitled to the forts themselves, unless there is something peculiar in the location of some particular fort that makes it important for us to hold it for the general defense of the whole country, its commerce and interests, instead of being useful only for the defense of a particular city or locality. It is true that Forts Taylor and Jefferson, at Key West and Tortugas, are so situated as to be essentially national, and therefore important to us without reference to our relations with the seceded States. Not so with Moultrie, Johnson, Castle Pinckney, and Sumter, in Charleston Harbor; not so with Pulaski, on the Savannah River; not so with Morgan and other forts in Alabama; not so with those other forts that were intended to guard the entrance of a particular harbor for local defense. . . . We can not deny tha
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.36
d the Dry Tortugas. In support of this resolution he said: We certainly can not justify the holding of forts there, much less the recapturing of those which have been taken, unless we intend to reduce those States themselves into subjection. I take it for granted, no man will deny the proposition, that whoever permanently holds Charleston and South Carolina is entitled to the possession of Fort Sumter. Whoever permanently holds Pensacola and Florida is entitled to the possession of Fort Pickens. Whoever holds the States in whose limits those forts are placed is entitled to the forts themselves, unless there is something peculiar in the location of some particular fort that makes it important for us to hold it for the general defense of the whole country, its commerce and interests, instead of being useful only for the defense of a particular city or locality. It is true that Forts Taylor and Jefferson, at Key West and Tortugas, are so situated as to be essentially national, an
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