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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
tion, on the part of the government of the United States, of the war which ensued. In it the Presi force were these: Whereas the laws of the United States have been for some time past, and now are,e state for electors of a President of the United States. On the next day an act was passed callinwn and designated as the Government of the United States. It is an anomaly among governments. Itsof all the powers of the government of the United States are to be found in that instrument of delend, as it would be an admission that the Confederate States were a separate and distinct sovereigntythe powers assumed by the President of the United States, and were actively engaged in levying troo, and Arkansas, and their union with the Confederate States. The former state, thus placed on the fach one equally with the others. If the Confederate States were still members of the Union, as the President of the United States asserted, where can he find a justification of these acts? In exp[19 more...]
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 4.41
ve-mentioned proclamation. The state of South Carolina is designated in the proclamation as a combination too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by law. This designation does not recognize the state, or manifest any consciousness of its existence, whereas South Carolina was one of the colonies that had declared her independence, and after a long and bloody war she had been recognized as a sovereign state by Great Britain, the only power to which she had ever owed allegiance. The fact that she had been one of the colonies in the original Congress, had been a member of the confederation, and subsequently of the Union, strengthens, but surely cannot impair, her claim to be a state. Though President Lincoln designated her as a combination, it did not make her a combination. Though he refused to recognize her as a state, it did not make her any less a state. By assertion, he attempted to annihilate seven
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
ving no relation to the question what is the value of Constitutional liberty, of Bills of rights, of limitations of powers, if they may be Transgressed at pleasure? secession of South Carolina proclamation of blockade session of Congress at Montgomery extracts from the President's message acts of Congress spirit of the people secession of border States destruction of United States property by order of President Lincoln. If any further evidence had been required to show that it was tStates signified nothing less than the subjugation of the Southern states, so that, by one devastating blow, the North might grasp forever that supremacy it had so long coveted. To be prepared for self-defense, I called Congress together at Montgomery on April 29th, and in the message of that date, thus spoke of the proclamation of the President of the United States: Apparently contradictory as are the terms of this singular document, one point is unmistakably evident. The President of the
Germantown (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
at Norfolk was abandoned after an attempt to destroy it. About midnight of April 20th, a fire was started in the yard, which continued to increase, and before daylight the work of destruction extended to two immense ship houses, one of which contained the entire frame of a seventy-four-gun ship, and to the long ranges of stores and offices on each side of the entrance. The great ship Pennsylvania was burned, and the frigates Merrimac and Columbus, and the Delaware, Raritan, Plymouth, and Germantown were sunk. A vast amount of machinery, valuable engines, small arms, and chronometers, was broken up and rendered entirely useless. The value of the property destroyed was estimated at several millions of dollars. This property thus destroyed had been accumulated and constructed with laborious care and skillful ingenuity during a course of years to fulfill one of the objects of the Constitution, which was expressed in these words, To provide for the common defense (see preamble of the
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
There is every reason for believing the destruction was complete. Simon Cameron, the Secretary of War, on April 22d replied to this report in these words: I am directed by the President of the United States to communicate to you, and through you to the officers and men under your command at Harpers Ferry Armory, the approbation of the Government of your and their judicious conduct there, and to tender you and them the thanks of the Government for the same. At the same time the shipyard at Norfolk was abandoned after an attempt to destroy it. About midnight of April 20th, a fire was started in the yard, which continued to increase, and before daylight the work of destruction extended to two immense ship houses, one of which contained the entire frame of a seventy-four-gun ship, and to the long ranges of stores and offices on each side of the entrance. The great ship Pennsylvania was burned, and the frigates Merrimac and Columbus, and the Delaware, Raritan, Plymouth, and Germantown w
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
posed to the laws, and obstrucing their execution in seven sovereign states which had retired from the Union. Seventy-five thousand men organized and equipped are a powerful army, and when raised to operate against these states, nothing else than war could be intended. The words in which he summoned this force were these: Whereas the laws of the United States have been for some time past, and now are, opposed, and the execution thereof obstructed, in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by law: Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, by virtue of the power in me vested by the Constitution and laws, etc. The power granted in the Constitution is thus expressed: The Congress shall have power to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel in
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
mitations of powers, if they may be Transgressed at pleasure? secession of South Carolina proclamation of blockade session of Congress at Montgomery extracts fromnd now are, opposed, and the execution thereof obstructed, in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, by combinati and on the 20th passed an ordinance to dissolve the union between the State of South Carolina and other States united with her under the compact entitled The Consti America. The ordinance began with these words: We the people of the State of South Carolina, in convention assembled, do declare and ordain, etc. The state authorate, President Lincoln issued the above-mentioned proclamation. The state of South Carolina is designated in the proclamation as a combination too powerful to be ecognize the state, or manifest any consciousness of its existence, whereas South Carolina was one of the colonies that had declared her independence, and after a lon
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
e exercise of his war power, and here we have another fiction. On April 19th, four days later, President Lincoln issued another proclamation, announcing a blockade of the ports of seven confedereated states, which was afterward extended to North Carolina and Virginia. It further declared that all persons who should under their authority molest any vessel of the United States, or the persons or cargo on board, should be treated as pirates. In their efforts to subjugate us, the destruction of other in the desire to be foremost in the public defense. The appearance of the proclamation of the President of the United States, calling out seventy-five thousand men, was followed by the immediate withdrawal of the states of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, and their union with the Confederate States. The former state, thus placed on the frontier and exposed to invasion, began to prepare for a resolute defense. Volunteers were ordered to be enrolled and held in readin
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
e content to submit to the exercise of the powers assumed by the President of the United States, and were actively engaged in levying troops for the purpose indicated in the proclamation. Meantime, being deprived of the aid of Congress, I had been under the necessity of confining my action to a call on the states for volunteers for the common defense, in accordance with authority previously conferred on me. I stated that there were then in the field, at Charleston, Pensacola, Forts Morgan, Jackson, St. Philip, and Pulaski, nineteen thousand men, and sixteen thousand more were on their way to Virginia; that it was proposed to organize and hold in readiness for instant action, in view of the existing exigencies of the country, an army of one hundred thousand men; that, if a further force should be needed, Congress would be appealed to for authority to call it into the field. Finally, that the intent of the President of the United States, already developed, to invade our soil, capture
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.41
seemed quite content to submit to the exercise of the powers assumed by the President of the United States, and were actively engaged in levying troops for the purpose indicated in the proclamation. Meantime, being deprived of the aid of Congress, I had been under the necessity of confining my action to a call on the states for volunteers for the common defense, in accordance with authority previously conferred on me. I stated that there were then in the field, at Charleston, Pensacola, Forts Morgan, Jackson, St. Philip, and Pulaski, nineteen thousand men, and sixteen thousand more were on their way to Virginia; that it was proposed to organize and hold in readiness for instant action, in view of the existing exigencies of the country, an army of one hundred thousand men; that, if a further force should be needed, Congress would be appealed to for authority to call it into the field. Finally, that the intent of the President of the United States, already developed, to invade our soi
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