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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. Search the whole document.

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Berkeley County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
Centreville, November 22, 1861. General Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General. sir: I have received Major-General Jackson's plan of operations in his district, for which he asks for reenforcements. It seems to me that he proposes more than can well be accomplished in that high, mountainous country at this season. If the means of driving the enemy from Romney (preventing the reconstruction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and incursions by marauders into the counties of Jefferson, Berkeley, and Morgan) can be supplied to General Jackson, and with them those objects accomplished, we shall have reason to be satisfied, so far as the Valley district is concerned. The wants of other portions of the frontier—Acquia district, for instance—make it inexpedient, in my opinion, to transfer to the Valley district so large a force as that asked for by Major-General Jackson. It seems to me to be now of especial importance to strengthen Major-General Holmes, near Acquia Creek. The force
Evansport (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
enever the enemy chooses to advance, and that he will be ready to take the field before yourself, clearly indicates prompt effort to disencumber yourself of everything which would interfere with your rapid movement when necessary, and such thorough examination of the country in your rear as would give you exact knowledge of its roads and general topography, and enable you to select a line of greater natural advantages than that now occupied by your forces. The heavy guns at Manassas and Evansport, needed elsewhere, and reported to be useless in their present position, would necessarily be abandoned in any hasty retreat. I regret that you find it impossible to move them. The subsistence stores should, when removed, be placed in positions to answer your future wants. Those can not be determined until you have furnished definite information as to your plans, especially the line to which you would remove in the contingency of retiring. The Commissary-General had previously stoppe
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
the War and Navy Departments of the British government made active and extensive provision to enforce it. The haughty temper displayed toward four gentlemen arrested on an unarmed ship subsided in view of a demand to be enforced by the army and navy of Great Britain, and the United States Secretary of State, after a wordy and ingenious reply to the minister of Great Britain at Washington city, wrote: The four persons in question are now held in military custody at Fort Warren, in the State of Massachusetts. They will be cheerfully liberated. Your lordship will please indicate a time and place for receiving them. There was a time when the government and the people of the United States would not have sanctioned such aggression on the right of friendly ships to pass unquestioned on the highway of nations, and the right of a neutral flag to protect everything not contraband of war; that was, however, a time when arrogance and duplicity had not led them into false positions, and when t
Romney (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
e to march against the enemy, who had captured Romney. On November 20, 1861, he wrote to the War Deartment, proposing an expedition to Romney, in western Virginia. It was decided to adopt his propohould be made to capture the Federal forces at Romney. The attack on Romney would probably induce MRomney would probably induce McClellan to believe that the Army of the Potomac had been so weakened as to justify him in making anmy at Manassas, let the troops that marched on Romney return to the Valley and move rapidly westwarhave been for some time slightly fortifying at Romney, and have completed their telegraph from that eason. If the means of driving the enemy from Romney (preventing the reconstruction of the Baltimoe recent activity of the enemy, the capture of Romney, etc., required that he should have for promptnandoah, leaving the balance of his command at Romney. General Loring, the senior officer there pree War Department in relation to the command at Romney, to repair to that place, and, after the needf[4 more...]
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
rs of your command for a month past, and then only to divert the current which threatened by legislation to destroy your army by a wholesale system of furloughs. Those which you inform me are daily received must be spurious. The authority to reenlist and change from infantry to artillery, the Secretary informs me, has been given but in four cases—three on the recommendation of General Beauregard, and specially explained to you some time since; the remaining case was that of a company from Wheeling, which was regarded as an exceptional one. I wish, therefore, that you would send to the Adjutant-General the cases of recent date in which the discipline of your troops has been interfered with in the two methods stated, so that an inquiry may be made into the origin of the papers presented. The law in relation to reenlistment provides for reorganization, and was under the policy of electing the officers. The concession to army opinions was limited to the promotion by seniority after
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
rred only on the President; and I must be able to assume responsibility of the action taken by whomsoever acts for me in that regard. By reference to the law, you will see that, in surrendering the sole power to appoint general officers, it was nevertheless designed, as far as should be found consistent, to keep up the State relation of troops and generals. Kentucky has a brigadier, but not a brigade; she has, however, a regiment—that regiment and brigadier might be associated together. Louisiana had regiments enough to form a brigade, but no brigadier in either corps; all of the regiments were sent to that corps commanded by a Louisiana general. Georgia has regiments now organized into two brigades; she has on duty with that army two brigadiers, but one of them serves with other troops. Mississippi troops were scattered as if the State were unknown. Brigadier-General Clark was sent to remove a growing dissatisfaction, but, though the State had nine regiments there, he (Clark) w
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
will see that, in surrendering the sole power to appoint general officers, it was nevertheless designed, as far as should be found consistent, to keep up the State relation of troops and generals. Kentucky has a brigadier, but not a brigade; she has, however, a regiment—that regiment and brigadier might be associated together. Louisiana had regiments enough to form a brigade, but no brigadier in either corps; all of the regiments were sent to that corps commanded by a Louisiana general. Georgia has regiments now organized into two brigades; she has on duty with that army two brigadiers, but one of them serves with other troops. Mississippi troops were scattered as if the State were unknown. Brigadier-General Clark was sent to remove a growing dissatisfaction, but, though the State had nine regiments there, he (Clark) was put in command of a post and depot of supplies. These nine regiments should form two brigades. Brigadiers Clark and (as a native of Mississippi) Whiting shoul
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
to them which are here appended: Richmond, Virginia, October 10, 1861. Major-General G. W. S men, rather than the internal police. Richmond, Virginia, October 20, 1861. General Beauregard, Mr elsewhere than in his own front. Richmond, Virginia, October 10, 1861. Major-General G. W. S truly, your friend, Jefferson Davis. Richmond, Virginia, November 18, 1861. General J. E. Johnst Inspector-General. November 25, 1861. Richmond, Virginia, November 10, 1861. General J. E. Johnstretary of War, is hereto annexed: Richmond, Virginia, February 14, 1862. General J. E. Johnst copy of which is hereto annexed: Richmond, Virginia, March 4, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, f the letter which was answered: Richmond, Virginia, February 28, 1862. General J. E. Joh respectfully yours, Jefferson Davis. Richmond, Virginia, March 6, 1862. General J. E. Johnsto retreat, and replied as follows: Richmond, Virginia, March 15, 1862. General J. E. Johnston,[3 more...]
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 4.48
ectful regard for the effort we were making to maintain the independence of the states which Great Britain had recognized, and her people knew to be our birthright. On November 8, 1861, an outragen resisting the right of visit and search, and had made it the cause of the War of 1812 with Great Britain. When intelligence of the event was received in England it excited the greatest indignatiEngland it excited the greatest indignation among the people; Her Majesty's government, by naval and other preparations, unmistakably exhibited the purpose to redress the wrong. The commissioners and their secretaries had been transporteested on an unarmed ship subsided in view of a demand to be enforced by the army and navy of Great Britain, and the United States Secretary of State, after a wordy and ingenious reply to the minister of Great Britain at Washington city, wrote: The four persons in question are now held in military custody at Fort Warren, in the State of Massachusetts. They will be cheerfully liberated. Your lor
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4.48
n, it was hoped, would be important in relieving our friends and securing recruits from those who wished to join us. Previously, General Johnston's attention had been called to possibilities in the valley of the Shenandoah, and that these and other like things were not done, was surely due to other causes than the policy of the Administration, as will appear by the letters hereto annexed: Richmond, Virginia, August 1, 1861. General J. E. Johnston: . . . General Lee has gone to western Virginia, and I hope may be able to strike a decisive blow in that quarter, or, failing in that, will be able to organize and post our troops so as to check the enemy, after which he will return to this place. The movement of Banks will require your attention. It may be a ruse, but, if a real movement, when your army has the requisite strength and mobility, you will probably find an opportunity, by a rapid movement through the passes, to strike him in rear or flank, and thus add another to
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