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Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
, which will be ours when we want it. All that is needful is to combine, push, and whip them. We have whipped, and should now push to the wall, all the forces in Mississippi, and capture the rolling stock of tile railroads west of the Alabama & Mobile. Bragg's army alone could repair the damage we have it in our power to do them. But I beseech you to bend every thing to push them while they are broken, weary, hungry, and ill supplied. Draw every thing from Memphis to help move on Holly Spriot start out to follow but a few days, and are much worn out; and I have information, not only that the enemy have reserves that are on their way to join the retreating column, but that they have fortifications to retreat to in case of need. The Mobile road is also open to the enemy to near Rienzi, and Corinth would be exposed by the advance. Although partial success might result from further pursuit, disaster would follow in the end. If you say so, however, it is not too late yet to go on, an
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
he battle at Iuka, he says: In the early part of September the enemy in our front manifested great activity, feeling with cavalry at all points, and on the 13th General Van Dorn threatened Corinth, while General Price seized the town of Iuka, which was promptly abandoned by a small garrison under Colonel Murphy. Price's force was about eight thousand men, and the general impression was that he was en route for Eastport, with the purpose to cross the Tennessee River in the direction of Nashville, in aid of General Bragg, then in full career for Kentucky. General Grant determined to attack him in force, prepared to regain Corinth before Van Dorn could reach it. He had drawn Ord to Corinth, and moved him by Burnsville on Iuka, by the main road twenty-six miles. General Grant accompanied this column as far as Burnsville. At the same time he had dispatched Rosecrans by roads to the south, via Jacinto, with orders to approach Iuka by the two main roads coming into Iuka from the sou
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
the time of the movement, and his full report made later: Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Yesterday the rebels under Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell were repulsed from their attack on Corinth with great sla wounded, are left on our hands. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. General Ord, who followed Hurlbut and took command, met the enemy to-day on the south side of the Hatchie, as I to get them to the right place. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 6, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Generals Ord and Hurlbut came on the enemy's rear yesterday, Hurlbut having driven in small bodies the day befo your army on the country? H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Jackson, October 8, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. An army can not subsist itself on the country except in forage. They did not start out to follow but a few days
Chewalla (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
s with our troops. Ord took two batteries and about two hundred prisoners. A large portion of Rosecrans' forces were at Chewalla. At this distance every thing looks most favorable, and I can not see how the enemy are to escape without losing every General Rosecrans of these fact, and directed him to urge on the good work. The following dispatch just received: Chewalla, October 6, 1862. To Major-General Grant. The enemy are totally routed, throwing every thing away. We are following unds of ammunition, and a large lot of accouterments. The enemy blew up several ammunition wagons between Corinth and Chewalla, and beyond Chewalla many ammunition wagons and carriages were destroyed, and the ground was strewn with tents, officersChewalla many ammunition wagons and carriages were destroyed, and the ground was strewn with tents, officers' mess chests, and small arms. We pursued them forty miles in force and sixty miles with cavalry. Our loss was only three hundred and fifteen killed, and eighteen hundred and twelve wounded, and two hundred and thirty-two prisoners and missing.
Fulton, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
th; but, as usual, Rosecrans had encountered difficulties in the confusion of roads. His head of column did not reach the vicinity of Iuka till 4 P. M. of the 19th, and then his troops were long drawn out on the single Jacinto road, leaving the Fulton road clear for Price's use. Price perceived his advantage, and attacked with vehemence the head of Rosecrans' column, Hamilton's division, beating it back, capturing a battery, and killing and disabling seven hundred and thirty-six men, so that when night closed in Rosecrans was driven to the defensive, and Price, perceiving his danger, deliberately withdrew by the Fulton road, and the next morning was gone. Although General Ord must have been within four or six miles of this battle, he did not hear a sound, and he or General Grant did not know of it till advised the next morning by a courier who had made a wide circuit to reach them. General Grant was much offended with General Rosecrans because of this affair; but in my experience t
Fort Hamilton (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
inity of Iuka till 4 P. M. of the 19th, and then his troops were long drawn out on the single Jacinto road, leaving the Fulton road clear for Price's use. Price perceived his advantage, and attacked with vehemence the head of Rosecrans' column, Hamilton's division, beating it back, capturing a battery, and killing and disabling seven hundred and thirty-six men, so that when night closed in Rosecrans was driven to the defensive, and Price, perceiving his danger, deliberately withdrew by the Fultse for General Rosecrans, and in what degree General Grant was offended, the reports of the last-named officer will show: Iuka, Miss., September 20, 1862. To Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief. General Rosecrans, with Stanley and Hamilton's divisions of Missouri cavalry, attacked General Price south of this village about two hours before dark yesterday, and had a sharp fight until night closed in. General Ord was to the north with an armed force of about five thousand men, and
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
s to Ripley. Troops from Bolivar will occupy Grand Juction to-morrow. With reenforcements rapidly sent in from the new lines, I can take any thing on the Mississippi Central road. I ordered Rosecrans back last night, but he is so adverse to returning that I have directed him to remain still, until you can be heard from. U. S. Grant, Major-General. General Rosecrans' protest against giving up the pursuit, thus referred to by General Grant, was as follows: headquarters, Jonesboro, Miss., October 7, 1862, midnight. Major-General Grant, Jackson, Tenn. Yours, 8:30 P. M., received. I most deeply dissent from your views as to the policy of pursuit. We have defeated, routed, and demoralized the army which held the Lower Mississippi Valley. We have the two railroads leading south to the Gulf, through the most populous parts of this State, into which we can now pursue them by the Mississippi Central or Mobile & Ohio Road. The effect of returning to our old position will
Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
eneral H. W. Halleck, Wasington, D. C. Rosecrans has followed rebels to Ripley. Troops from Bolivar will occupy Grand Juction to-morrow. With reenforcements rapidly sent in from the new lines, Iosecrans, was resisting and repelling the onslaught of the rebel hosts at Corinth, another from Bolivar, under Major-General Hurlbut, was marching upon the enemy's rear, driving in their pickets and railroad all the troops that could possibly be spared (six regiments) to reenforce Corinth and Bolivar, as before stated; four of these were sent under General McPherson to the former place and formed the advance in the pursuit. Two were sent to Bolivar, and gave that much additional force to be spared to operate on the enemy's rear. When I ascertained that the enemy had succeeded in crossiwed so far, and that our forces were very much scattered, I immediately ordered an advance from Bolivar to be made, to cover the return of the Corinth forces. They went as far south as Davis' Mills,
Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
for Eastport, with the purpose to cross the Tennessee River in the direction of Nashville, in aid of General Bragg, then in full career for Kentucky. General Grant determined to attack him in force, prepared to regain Corinth before Van Dorn could reach it. He had drawn Ord to Corinth, and moved him by Burnsville on Iuka, by the main road twenty-six miles. General Grant accompanied this column as far as Burnsville. At the same time he had dispatched Rosecrans by roads to the south, via Jacinto, with orders to approach Iuka by the two main roads coming into Iuka from the south, viz., the Jacinto and Fulton roads. On the 18th General Ord encountered the enemy about four miles out of Iuka. His orders contemplated that he should not make a serious attack until Rosecrans had gained his position on the south; but, as usual, Rosecrans had encountered difficulties in the confusion of roads. His head of column did not reach the vicinity of Iuka till 4 P. M. of the 19th, and then his
Grand Junction (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
aching his fortifications at Holly Springs, and where a garrison of several thousand troops was left that were not engaged in the battle of Corinth. Our own troops would have suffered for food, and suffered greatly from fatigue. Finding that the pursuit had followed so far, and that our forces were very much scattered, I immediately ordered an advance from Bolivar to be made, to cover the return of the Corinth forces. They went as far south as Davis' Mills, about seven miles south of Grand Junction, drove a small rebel garrison from there, and entirely destroyed the railroad bridges at that place. The accompanying reports show fully all the casualties and other results of these battles. I am, Colonel, very respectfully your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, Major-General commanding. The following is the close of General Rosecrans' report of this battle: Thus by noon ended the battle of the 4th of October. After waiting for the enemy's return a short time, our sk
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