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Hazel Run (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
hills for about 800 yards, until it reached the valley of Hazel Run, into which it turned. This sunken road was made part ofdquarters on a hill, since called Lee's Hill, overlooking Hazel Run and the eastern half of the field in front of the town. of two brigades under cover of the bluffs at the mouth of Hazel Run. Burns's division of three brigades on the left connecteenkins's brigade was also advanced down the right bank of Hazel Run, reinforcing a company of sharp-shooters which had been ddivision of the 9th corps, two brigades, from the left on Hazel Run, was ordered to assault, but no steps were taken to have phreys was arranging his attack. Being near the mouth of Hazel Run, they had farther to advance before reaching the field, il it came to marshy ground, through which ran a ditch to Hazel Run. Here they opened fire, and their position was defined tntry and artillery replied from Marye's Hill, from across Hazel Run, and from guns upon Lee's Hill. They crossed the ditch,
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
upied the town. Franklin crossed the 1st and 6th corps by the lower bridges and occupied the plain as far out as the Bowling Green road, a half mile from the river, and the same distance in front of the wooded range of hills occupied by Jackson's cere, of the river in front, practically constituted a fortress, with the plains of the south bank as its glacis. The Bowling Green road, along their middle, running between high banks on each side, made a powerful advanced work, and the low bluffs division, a little in rear on its right flank, and Doubleday's on its left. Some delay ensued in their crossing the Bowling Green road, owing to the hedges and ditches lining it, which had to be made passable for the artillery, and here the Confedtillery across the Massaponax. Birney's and Newton's divisions of the 3d and 6th corps were also sent forward to the Bowling Green road to support the attack, which Meade, at 1 P. M., was about to renew with Gibbon on his right. So the assault had
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
There were constant sharp skirmishes, and the enemy got possession of the two lower gaps in the Blue Ridge, Snicker's and Ashby's, and held the outlet of Manassas Gap. McClellan's headquarters were advanced to Rectortown. His cavalry occupied Warrenton, and it was evident that he would soon cross the Rappahannock. Then, suddenly, his activity ceased, and from Nov. 9 to the 17th, the Federal army laid quietly in its camps. His backdown had come too late. He had been removed from the commanOn the 17th it was learned that gunboats and transports had entered Acquia Creek, on which W. H. F. Lee's brigade of cavalry was despatched in that direction, and Stuart was ordered to force a crossing of the Rappahannock and reconnoitre toward Warrenton. This was done on the 18th, and the enemy's general movement was discovered. A part of Longstreet's corps was put in motion on the 18th, and the remainder followed next day. Sumner's corps arrived at Falmouth on the 17th, and an artillery
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ampaign changed. Burnside's strength. Lee's strength. Sumner at Falmouth. non-arrival of pontoons. surrender demanded. earthworks erecte and the remainder followed next day. Sumner's corps arrived at Falmouth on the 17th, and an artillery duel ensued, across the river, rashlleft Winchester until Nov. 22, five days after Sumner's arrival at Falmouth. His troops had marched 150 miles in 10 days, but Lee and Jacksoning hills and plateaus of the north bank, with its concave bend at Falmouth and unlimited positions for artillery, protected by the wet ditch,urning the Confederate left along the very edge of the river above Falmouth, supported by artillery on the north bank which could enfilade and or portions of it, also believed that the Federal artillery above Falmouth, which kept up a constant long-range fire with their heavy rifles rible. I sent word several times to our artillery on the right of Falmouth that they were firing into us and were tearing our men to pieces.
North Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
buted largely to the repulse of the enemy's assaults upon Marye's Hill. Great sympathy, of course, was felt for the citizens, and Lee, immediately after his arrival, ordered batteries to be erected, from which the enemy's positions, upon the hills commanding the town from the north, could be replied to by our rifled guns, in case of their shelling the town. Lee at first had not intended to give battle at Fredericksburg, but had proposed after delaying the enemy to fall back behind the North Anna River, and to deliver his battle there. Both he and Jackson objected to the position at Fredericksburg that the river, with the commanding positions on the north bank, could always afford a safe retreat to a beaten enemy, as the Antietam had done at Sharpsburg. This was undoubtedly true, as was soon afterward proved when the battle took place. At the North Anna the enemy, if defeated, might be successfully pursued and some fruits of victory be gathered. But the position at Fredericksbur
Sperryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
m's Artillery 5 Batteries, 22 Guns9,146 Pendleton's Reserve ArtilleryBrown's Battalion, 6 Batteries Cutt's Battalion, 3 Batteries Nelson's Battalion, 3 Batteries Total 36 Guns718 Aggregate38 Brigades Infantry, 4 Brigades Cavalry, 63 Batteries, 255 Guns71,472 On Oct. 27 Lee moved with Longstreet's corps and Pendleton's reserve arty. toward the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge. My reserve ordnance train moved on the 29th via Nineveh, Front Royal, Chester Gap, Gaines's Cross-roads and Sperryville, and encamped at Culpeper on Nov. 4. Lee, in person, had already arrived there. A few days after I was placed in command of the battalion of artillery which had been commanded by Col. S. D. Lee, who was now promoted brigadier-general and sent to Vicksburg. My successor as chief of ordnance was Col. Briscoe G. Baldwin, who served with great success until the surrender at Appomattox. Meanwhile, an important event was on foot. We have seen the lack of cordiality between McClellan and
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ton's, Lee F., Lee, W. H. F., Jones's, W. E.; Pelham's Artillery 5 Batteries, 22 Guns9,146 Pendleton's Reserve ArtilleryBrown's Battalion, 6 Batteries Cutt's Battalion, 3 Batteries Nelson's Battalion, 3 Batteries Total 36 Guns718 Aggregate38 Brigades Infantry, 4 Brigades Cavalry, 63 Batteries, 255 Guns71,472 On Oct. 27 Lee moved with Longstreet's corps and Pendleton's reserve arty. toward the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge. My reserve ordnance train moved on the 29th via Nineveh, Front Royal, Chester Gap, Gaines's Cross-roads and Sperryville, and encamped at Culpeper on Nov. 4. Lee, in person, had already arrived there. A few days after I was placed in command of the battalion of artillery which had been commanded by Col. S. D. Lee, who was now promoted brigadier-general and sent to Vicksburg. My successor as chief of ordnance was Col. Briscoe G. Baldwin, who served with great success until the surrender at Appomattox. Meanwhile, an important event was on foot. We have
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
per's Ferry. Pontoon bridges were laid, and the army crossed over rather leisurely, the last of it, Franklin's corps, on Nov. 1 and 2. We will now return to the Confederates, who, since Sharpsburg, have been resting and recuperating between Winchester and Bunker Hill. Our base of supplies was now Staunton, more than 100 miles distant, but over fairly good roads. Our trains were actively at work, bringing ammunition, food, and clothing, and gradually our condition approached the normal. e river was over 1000 feet wide. Lee discovered his preparations, and as Jackson's corps had arrived from the Valley about Nov. 29, it was moved to the right, and observed the river as far as Port Royal, 18 miles below. Jackson had not left Winchester until Nov. 22, five days after Sumner's arrival at Falmouth. His troops had marched 150 miles in 10 days, but Lee and Jackson had both presumed largely on Burnside's want of enterprise in allowing, for even a few days, 150 miles to separate th
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ore dawn brought the music of bands and commands of officers all strangely muffled but clearly audible in the still air. We were now about to measure our strength with the largest and best-equipped army that had ever stood upon a battle-field in America. But our own army was better organized and stronger than ever before, and now, finding itself concentrated at exactly the right moment, it was as confident and elated as if the victory had already been won. About 10 A. M., the gradual cleariPositions for 184 guns had been selected, covering the approaches to the points chosen for crossing, and roads had been found and opened as secretly as possible. But, nevertheless, the Federal activity had been noted, especially at Banks and United States fords, and, on the 19th, Lee sent a brigade to strengthen our pickets there. As the distances were not great from the Federal camps before Fredericksburg to the positions about Banks Ford, most of their guns were able to reach their position
Massaponax Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
the division, Gregg's, was placed in the military road opposite the swamp and gap between Archer and Lane. If we call this disposition of Hill's troops one of two lines, a third line was formed by the divisions of Early and Taliaferro — Early on the right —a short distance in rear, and a fourth one by the division of D. H. Hill in rear of that. Burnside was losing one of the advantages of his superior force by concentrating it upon too short a front. He was hemmed in on the left by Massaponax Creek, and was confined to a front attack. With only a mile and a half to defend and with about 30,000 infantry in hand, covered by the woods from accurate artillery fire, Jackson was very strong. With this understanding of the positions and forces the result might have been predicted. The faulty disposition of A. P. Hill's division, with two gaps in his front line, would surely allow to the enemy a temporary success. But the strong reserves close at hand were enough to restore the battl
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