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Old Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 14
mmand of the 5th corps, and to be succeeded by Hooker. On the same date these formal orders were the four next in line for promotion —Burnside, Hooker, Sumner, and Franklin. The older officers deCarr, Hall, Revere Piatt, Carroll9 Batteries Hooker5th CorpsGriffinBarnes, Sweitzer, Stockton But division numbered about 27,000 on the field. Hooker's grand division had not yet been brought acro came a comparative lull in the conflict. But Hooker was under orders to attack with his whole forc the 5th corps. Even before Griffin's charge, Hooker had looked at the field, and become so convincThe answer came that the attack must be made. Hooker, however, considered it a duty to his troops t the position must be carried before night. Hooker, accordingly, returned and began to prepare foded in their respective fronts. It seems that Hooker's request was refused, for no flag was here shgnation. He made the issue boldly, first with Hooker, and next with Franklin, and his principal off[8 more...]
, when completed, stood as follows, the strength being given from the returns of Nov. 20, 1862. Organization of army of Northern Va., Nov., 1862 1ST corps, Longstreet's DIVISIONBRIGADES and ARTILLERYPRESENT for duty McLaws'sKershaw's, Barksdale's, Cobb's, Semmes's, Cabell's Battalion Artillery, 4 Batteries, 18 Guns7,898 Anderson'sWilcox's, Mahone's, Featherstone's, Wright's, Perry's Unorganized Artillery, 4 Batteries, 18 Guns7,639 Pickett'sGarnett's, Kemper's, Armistead's, Jenkins's, Corse's Unorganized Artillery, 3 Batteries, 14 Guns7,567 Total23,104 1ST corps, Longstreet's (Continued) DIVISIONBRIGADES and ARTILLERYPRESENT for duty Hood'sTotal carried forward Law's, Robertson's, Anderson's, Benning's23,104 Unorganized Artillery, 3 Batteries, 14 Guns7,334 Walker's Ransom's, Cooke's, No Artillery3,855 Reserve ArtilleryAlexander's Battalion. 6 Batteries, 26 Guns623 Washington Artillery. 4 Batteries, 9 Guns Total5 Divisions, 20 Brigades 24 Batteries, 99 Guns29,916
lties. on the Federal right. the Formations. French and Hancock charge. Howard charges. Sturgis charges. sunken road RerpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Right Grand Division2d CorpsHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook CouchHoward FrenchSully, Owen, Hapon the bridge work. This lost 50 killed and wounded, and Hancock reported the loss of 150 in two regiments which had supporhe order— Kimball, Andrews, Palmer. In close support came Hancock with Zook, Meagher, and Caldwell. Howard's division was a kept up fire both at the Confederate guns and infantry. Hancock's division soon followed French's and with a similar exper right of the Plank road, and was preparing to do so, when Hancock called for supports, and Howard was diverted to the same ff the city to the left of the ground over which French and Hancock had fought. He did not have the canal to cross, as it ters quickly spread and reached Couch, who said to Humphreys, Hancock reports the enemy is falling back. Now is the time for yo
Butterfield (search for this): chapter 14
e's organization was as follows:— Grand Divs.corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Right Grand Division2d CorpsHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook CouchHoward FrenchSully, Owen, Hall, Kimball, Palmer, Andrews8 Batteries Sumner9th Corps WillcoxSturgis GettyPoe, Christ, Leasure Nagle, Ferrero Hawkins, Harland6 Batteries Centre Grand Division3d CorpsBirneyRobinson, Ward, Berry StonemanSickles WhippleCarr, Hall, Revere Piatt, Carroll9 Batteries Hooker5th CorpsGriffinBarnes, Sweitzer, Stockton ButterfieldSykesBuchanan, Andrew, Warren8 Batteries HumphreysTyler, Allabach Left Grand Division1st CorpsDoubledayPhelps, Rogers, Gavin, Meredith ReynoldsGibbon MeadeRoot, Lyle, Taylor Sinclair, Magilton, Jackson11 Batteries Franklin6th CorpsBrooksTorbert, Cake, Russell W. F. SmithHowePratt, Whiting, Vinton11 Batteries NewtonCochrane, Devens, Rowley 6 Corps18 Divisions51 Brigades53 Batteries Burnside began his campaign with a blunder. He adopted Richmond as his objective, instead of Lee's
lans as the moment of execution drew near. Franklin had been informed that Burnside would give the final order which should put his force in motion. About 7 A. M. on the 13th an order came, but it was not at all the order expected. It made no reference to the plans of the day before, but ordered Franklin to keep his whole command in position for a rapid movement down the old Richmond road. Then he was to send out, at once, a division, at least, to seize, if possible, the height near Capt. Hamilton's on this side of the Massaponax, taking care to keep it well supported and its line of retreat open. The order went on to tell Franklin what Sumner was to be doing at the same time. He was also to send a division or more up the Plank road to its intersection with the Telegraph road, where they will divide with the view of seizing the heights on both of these roads. Then the order set forth what he hoped to accomplish. Holding these two heights, he hopes will compel the enemy to ev
B. G. Humphreys (search for this): chapter 14
sunken road Reenforced. Griffin's charge. Humphreys's first charge. Humphreys's second charge. Humphreys's second charge. Humphreys's report. Tyler's report. Getty's charge. Hawkins's account. a Federal conference. ple of the 3d corps, and Griffin, Sykes, and Humphreys of the 5th) were held near the upper bridges with his whole force, and he had yet intact Humphreys's and Sykes's divisions of the 5th corps. Ehought to be the beginning of a retreat. Humphreys's division was composed of two brigades, Allh that of Humphreys. Had there been time, Humphreys, from his experience with Allabach, would hae. With all its officers in front, led by Humphreys and Tyler, and with a loud hurrah, which wasderal ranks. Couch writes of this charge of Humphreys's division, as follows, in the Century magazd in reserve on the edge of the town, behind Humphreys, and at 11 P. M. was sent across the canal, who had now come at the request of Willcox, Humphreys, Meade, Getty, and others to protest against[12 more...]
Nagle, Ferrero Hawkins, Harland6 Batteries Centre Grand Division3d CorpsBirneyRobinson, Ward, Berry StonemanSickles WhippleCarr, Hall, Revere Piatt, Carroll9 Batteries Hooker5th CorpsGriffinBarnes, Sweitzer, Stockton ButterfieldSykesBuchanan, Andrew, Warren8 Batteries HumphreysTyler, Allabach Left Grand Division1st CorpsDoubledayPhelps, Rogers, Gavin, Meredith ReynoldsGibbon MeadeRoot, Lyle, Taylor Sinclair, Magilton, Jackson11 Batteries Franklin6th CorpsBrooksTorbert, Cake, Russell W. dvanced over the crest of the plateau, it met the Confederate fire. Kimball's brigade led, and no brigade during the day advanced farther, and but few as far. But he was wounded, and his brigade repulsed with a loss of 520 men within 20 minutes. Andrew's brigade followed, and was likewise driven back with the loss of 342. Palmer, who came next, lost 291. The whole loss of the division (including its artillery which fired from the edge of the town) was 1160. About this time Ransom, seeing pre
position upon the Federal flank should fail to prevent their advance. Burnside's organization was as follows:— Grand Divs.corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Right Grand Division2d CorpsHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook CouchHoward FrenchSully, Owen, Hall, Kimball, Palmer, Andrews8 Batteries Sumner9th Corps WillcoxSturgis GettyPoe, Christ, Leasure Nagle, Ferrero Hawkins, Harland6 Batteries Centre Grand Division3d CorpsBirneyRobinson, Ward, Berry StonemanSickles WhippleCarr, Hall, Revere Pids. The turn of Howard's division came next. He had been at first directed to attack upon his right of the Plank road, and was preparing to do so, when Hancock called for supports, and Howard was diverted to the same field. His leading brigade, Owen's, did not push its assault so far as to be broken by the Confederate fire, but lay down where it could find a little cover. It was able here to hold its position until relieved after nightfall. His losses were 258. Howard's second brigade was
MeadeRoot, Lyle, Taylor Sinclair, Magilton, Jackson11 Batteries Franklin6th CorpsBrooksTorbert, Cake, Russell W. F. SmithHowePratt, Whiting, Vinton11 Batteries NewtonCochrane, Devens, Rowley 6 Corps18 Divisions51 Brigades53 Batteries Burnside began his campaign with a blunder. He adopted Richmond as his objective, insteade support. Doubleday's division was moved up nearer behind Meade's left, and engaged with Stuart's skirmishers and artillery across the Massaponax. Birney's and Newton's divisions of the 3d and 6th corps were also sent forward to the Bowling Green road to support the attack, which Meade, at 1 P. M., was about to renew with Gibbo He made the issue boldly, first with Hooker, and next with Franklin, and his principal officers. The proposed order dismissed from the Army Hooker, Brooks, and Newton, commanding divisions, and Cochrane, commanding a brigade in the 6th corps; and it relieved from further duty with the army, Franklin, Smith, commanding the 6th c
TILLERYPRESENT for duty McLaws'sKershaw's, Barksdale's, Cobb's, Semmes's, Cabell's Battalion Artillery, 4 Batteries, 18 Guns7,898 Anderson'sWilcox's, Mahone's, Featherstone's, Wright's, Perry's Unorganized Artillery, 4 Batteries, 18 Guns7,639 Pickett'sGarnett's, Kemper's, Armistead's, Jenkins's, Corse's Unorganized Artillery, 3 Batteries, 14 Guns7,567 Total23,104 1ST corps, Longstreet's (Continued) DIVISIONBRIGADES and ARTILLERYPRESENT for duty Hood'sTotal carried forward Law's, Robert for duty, by divisions, as follows:— 1ST corps, LongstreetSTRENGTH2D corps, JacksonSTRENGTH Anderson's Division7,639Ewell's Division7,716 Hood's Division7,334A. P. Hill's Division11,554 McLaws's Division 7,898D. H. Hill's Division8,944 Pickett's Division7,567Jackson's Division5,005 Ransom's Division3,855Reserve Artillery473 Reserve Artillery623 Total 2d Corps33,692 Total 1st Corps34,886Total two Corps68,578 Adding Pendleton's reserve artillery, 718, Stuart's cavalry, 9146, and 41
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