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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
. Meade strikes Gregg. the counter-stroke. Jackson's proposed attack. casualties. on the Federades 24 Batteries, 99 Guns29,916 2D corps, Jackson's Ewell'sLawton's, Early's, Trimble's, Hays' such a position. From Longstreet's corps to Jackson's was over 40 miles by the roads across the m This had been Lee's plan, if the threat of Jackson's position upon the Federal flank should fail Hill's Division8,944 Pickett's Division7,567Jackson's Division5,005 Ransom's Division3,855Reservded to give battle at Fredericksburg, against Jackson's protest. Burnside's pontoons arrived on e. Lee discovered his preparations, and as Jackson's corps had arrived from the Valley about Nov the country about Skinker's Neck, discovered Jackson's camps, and Burnside knew that his designs wront of the wooded range of hills occupied by Jackson's corps. Much has been said of the strength he long warning it had had. The fact was that Jackson's troops had been in observation of the river
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
d McClellan to decide whether his advance should be up the Shenandoah Valley, or east of the Blue Ridge, but expressed a preference for the latter route. McClellan, however, had decided to take the Valley route, for fear of Lee's advancing into Md. and Pa. if it was left uncovered. Both Lincoln and Halleck thought his fears groundless and his caution excessive. Neither of them believed the Confederate army to be as immense as McClellan reported, and both knew that if the Federals needed suong as his presence embarrassed the enemy, but to keep in view that the two corps must be united in order to give battle. The Federal army was supplied with balloons. McClellan had used them on the Peninsula, but during Pope's campaign, and in Md., they had not been seen, although the open character of the country would have often exposed and embarrassed the most important movements of the Confederates, had balloonists been on the lookout. Now, the balloons reconnoitring the country about
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
y every channel, McClellan on Oct. 7 received instructions to cross the Potomac and give battle to the enemy, or drive him south. The army must move now while the roads are good. On receipt of this, McClellan conferred with his chief quartermaster, who thought that sufficient supplies would be on hand within three days. Meanwhile, on Oct. 10 a fresh trouble arose. Stuart with 1800 cavalry and Pelham's battery had been sent by Lee upon a raid. Fording the Potomac, some 15 miles above Williamsport, at dawn on the 10th, by dark Stuart reached Chambersburg, where he burned a machine-shop, many loaded cars, and a supply depot, paroled 285 sick and wounded Federals, and gathered about 500 horses. Next morning he moved to Emmitsburg, and thence below the mouth of the Monocacy, where he recrossed the Potomac, on the forenoon of the 12th. The distance travelled had been 126 miles, of which the last 80 from Chambersburg were accomplished without a halt. An epidemic of foot-and-mouth d
Chester Gap (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
, Lee, W. H. F., Jones's, W. E.; Pelham's Artillery 5 Batteries, 22 Guns9,146 Pendleton's Reserve ArtilleryBrown's Battalion, 6 Batteries Cutt's Battalion, 3 Batteries Nelson's Battalion, 3 Batteries Total 36 Guns718 Aggregate38 Brigades Infantry, 4 Brigades Cavalry, 63 Batteries, 255 Guns71,472 On Oct. 27 Lee moved with Longstreet's corps and Pendleton's reserve arty. toward the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge. My reserve ordnance train moved on the 29th via Nineveh, Front Royal, Chester Gap, Gaines's Cross-roads and Sperryville, and encamped at Culpeper on Nov. 4. Lee, in person, had already arrived there. A few days after I was placed in command of the battalion of artillery which had been commanded by Col. S. D. Lee, who was now promoted brigadier-general and sent to Vicksburg. My successor as chief of ordnance was Col. Briscoe G. Baldwin, who served with great success until the surrender at Appomattox. Meanwhile, an important event was on foot. We have seen the lac
Berlin, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ent to the Peninsula; and in determining to march to Fredericksburg he cherished the hope of being able to winter there upon an easy base of supplies, and in the spring embarking his army for the James River. The three weeks delay between his arrival and his crossing the river suggests the lack of definite plans. At first the delay was attributed to the non-arrival of pontoon trains. These trains had been ordered on Nov. 6 from Rectortown to Washington City. This order failed to reach Berlin until the 12th. Sumner was anxious to cross, and asked Burnside if he might do so without waiting for pontoons, if he could find a ford. He had found the ford before he made the request, but Burnside's inclinations were adverse to a battle and he could not be beguiled. So the small Confederate force held the town until the 20th, when Longstreet arrived with McLaws's division, and was followed the next day by the remainder of the corps. On the 21st Sumner sent a formal demand for th
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
toward a repetition of McClellan's movement to the Peninsula; and in determining to march to Fredericksburg he cherished the hope of being able to winter there upon an easy base of supplies, and in the spring embarking his army for the James River. The three weeks delay between his arrival and his crossing the river suggests the lack of definite plans. At first the delay was attributed to the non-arrival of pontoon trains. These trains had been ordered on Nov. 6 from Rectortown to Washington City. This order failed to reach Berlin until the 12th. Sumner was anxious to cross, and asked Burnside if he might do so without waiting for pontoons, if he could find a ford. He had found the ford before he made the request, but Burnside's inclinations were adverse to a battle and he could not be beguiled. So the small Confederate force held the town until the 20th, when Longstreet arrived with McLaws's division, and was followed the next day by the remainder of the corps. On th
Port Royal, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
er's Neck, 12 miles below Fredericksburg, where the river was over 1000 feet wide. Lee discovered his preparations, and as Jackson's corps had arrived from the Valley about Nov. 29, it was moved to the right, and observed the river as far as Port Royal, 18 miles below. Jackson had not left Winchester until Nov. 22, five days after Sumner's arrival at Falmouth. His troops had marched 150 miles in 10 days, but Lee and Jackson had both presumed largely on Burnside's want of enterprise in allow bridge-heads during the night. This delay robbed Burnside's strategy of its only merit. It had been his hope to find Lee's army somewhat dispersed, as indeed it had been; D. H. Hill's and Early's divisions having been at Skinker's Neck and Port Royal, 12 to 22 miles away. But they were recalled on the 12th and reached the field on the morning of the 13th after hard marching. The casualties suffered by the Confederates engaged in this defence were 224 killed and wounded and 105 missing. Of
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
y reserve ordnance train moved on the 29th via Nineveh, Front Royal, Chester Gap, Gaines's Cross-roads and Sperryville, and encamped at Culpeper on Nov. 4. Lee, in person, had already arrived there. A few days after I was placed in command of the battalion of artillery which had been commanded by Col. S. D. Lee, who was now promoted brigadier-general and sent to Vicksburg. My successor as chief of ordnance was Col. Briscoe G. Baldwin, who served with great success until the surrender at Appomattox. Meanwhile, an important event was on foot. We have seen the lack of cordiality between McClellan and the President, and the growth of mistrust of the former's intention to prosecute the active offensive campaign desired. On Oct. 27 he had telegraphed the President urging the necessity of filling the old regiments with drafted men before taking them into action again. The tone of his letters had long been unsatisfactory, and this expression kindled into flame the growing suspicion th
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
to a despatch about sore-tongued and fatigued horses, Will you pardon me for asking what the horses of your army have done, since the battle of Antietam, that fatigues anything? On Oct. 26, McClellan put his army in motion, 19 days after his receipt of the President's order. By this time he was willing to adopt the line of advance east of the Blue Ridge, as the stage of water in the Potomac River now made all fords impracticable. The crossing was made at Berlin, about 10 miles below Harper's Ferry. Pontoon bridges were laid, and the army crossed over rather leisurely, the last of it, Franklin's corps, on Nov. 1 and 2. We will now return to the Confederates, who, since Sharpsburg, have been resting and recuperating between Winchester and Bunker Hill. Our base of supplies was now Staunton, more than 100 miles distant, but over fairly good roads. Our trains were actively at work, bringing ammunition, food, and clothing, and gradually our condition approached the normal. But
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ithin three days. Meanwhile, on Oct. 10 a fresh trouble arose. Stuart with 1800 cavalry and Pelham's battery had been sent by Lee upon a raid. Fording the Potomac, some 15 miles above Williamsport, at dawn on the 10th, by dark Stuart reached Chambersburg, where he burned a machine-shop, many loaded cars, and a supply depot, paroled 285 sick and wounded Federals, and gathered about 500 horses. Next morning he moved to Emmitsburg, and thence below the mouth of the Monocacy, where he recrossed the Potomac, on the forenoon of the 12th. The distance travelled had been 126 miles, of which the last 80 from Chambersburg were accomplished without a halt. An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease was prevailing at this time among the enemy's cavalry, The same disease, sore tongue and soft hoof, was complained of by Lee on Nov. 7 to the Sec. of War, as affecting his cavalry. and the desperate efforts to intercept Stuart, made with reduced forces, put much of it out of condition for active s
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