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Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry 5241
mission (q. v.). The corporate names of the two organizations indicate their respective spheres of operation. On the day that President Lincoln issued his call for 75,000 men, the women of Bridgeport, Conn., organized a society for the purpose of affording relief and comfort to the volunteers. This was the first in all the land. On the same day (April 15, 1861) a woman in Charlestown, Mass. (Miss Almena Bates), took steps to form a similar organization, and a few days later the women of Lowell did the same. They proposed to supply nurses for the sick and wounded, and provisions, clothing, and other comforts not furnished by the government; also to send books and newspapers to the camps, and to keep up a constant communication with their friends in the field. On the 19th the women of Cleveland, O., formed an association for the purpose of taking care of the families of the volunteers. Earnest women in New York, at the suggestion of Rev. Henry W. Bellows, D. D. (q. v.) and Dr.
United States (United States) (search for this): entry 5241
Sanitary commission, the United States ; one of two great popular organizations established to promote the relief and comfort of the National soldiers and sailors during the American Civil War, the other body being the United States Christian commission (q. v.). The corporate names of the two organizations indicate their respective spheres of operation. On the day that President Lincoln issued his call for 75,000 men, the women of Bridgeport, Conn., organized a society for the purpose of affording relief and comfort to the volunteers. This was the first in all the land. On the same day (April 15, 1861) a woman in Charlestown, Mass. (Miss Almena Bates), took steps to form a similar organization, and a few days later the women of Lowell did the same. They proposed to supply nurses for the sick and wounded, and provisions, clothing, and other comforts not furnished by the government; also to send books and newspapers to the camps, and to keep up a constant communication with
Charlestown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry 5241
tional soldiers and sailors during the American Civil War, the other body being the United States Christian commission (q. v.). The corporate names of the two organizations indicate their respective spheres of operation. On the day that President Lincoln issued his call for 75,000 men, the women of Bridgeport, Conn., organized a society for the purpose of affording relief and comfort to the volunteers. This was the first in all the land. On the same day (April 15, 1861) a woman in Charlestown, Mass. (Miss Almena Bates), took steps to form a similar organization, and a few days later the women of Lowell did the same. They proposed to supply nurses for the sick and wounded, and provisions, clothing, and other comforts not furnished by the government; also to send books and newspapers to the camps, and to keep up a constant communication with their friends in the field. On the 19th the women of Cleveland, O., formed an association for the purpose of taking care of the families of
Poughkeepsie (New York, United States) (search for this): entry 5241
uds to visit wounded soldiers on the battle-field. The commission was to supplement government deficiencies. An appeal was made to the people, and was met by a most liberal response. Supplies and money flowed in, from all quarters, sufficient to meet every demand. All over the country, men, women, and children were seen working singly and collectively for it. Fairs were held in cities, which turned immense sums of money into the treasury of the commission. One small city alone (Poughkeepsie, N. Y.) contributed $16,000, or $1 for every man, woman, and child of its population. Branches were established; ambulances, army-wagons, and steamboats were employed in the transportation of the sick and wounded. It followed the armies closely in all campaigns, and before the smoke of conflict had been fairly lifted, there was the commission with its tents, vehicles, supplies, and necessaries. When the war was ended, and the work of the sanitary commission was made plain, it was found
Bridgeport (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry 5241
Sanitary commission, the United States ; one of two great popular organizations established to promote the relief and comfort of the National soldiers and sailors during the American Civil War, the other body being the United States Christian commission (q. v.). The corporate names of the two organizations indicate their respective spheres of operation. On the day that President Lincoln issued his call for 75,000 men, the women of Bridgeport, Conn., organized a society for the purpose of affording relief and comfort to the volunteers. This was the first in all the land. On the same day (April 15, 1861) a woman in Charlestown, Mass. (Miss Almena Bates), took steps to form a similar organization, and a few days later the women of Lowell did the same. They proposed to supply nurses for the sick and wounded, and provisions, clothing, and other comforts not furnished by the government; also to send books and newspapers to the camps, and to keep up a constant communication with
Cleveland (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry 5241
e first in all the land. On the same day (April 15, 1861) a woman in Charlestown, Mass. (Miss Almena Bates), took steps to form a similar organization, and a few days later the women of Lowell did the same. They proposed to supply nurses for the sick and wounded, and provisions, clothing, and other comforts not furnished by the government; also to send books and newspapers to the camps, and to keep up a constant communication with their friends in the field. On the 19th the women of Cleveland, O., formed an association for the purpose of taking care of the families of the volunteers. Earnest women in New York, at the suggestion of Rev. Henry W. Bellows, D. D. (q. v.) and Dr. Elisha Harris, met with a few earnest men, and formed the Women's Central Association for Relief. Auxiliary associations were formed. Then an organization on a more extended and efficient plan was formed, which contemplated the co-operation of the medical department of the army, under the sanction of the
R. C. Wood (search for this): entry 5241
all for troops (April 23) the Secretary of War issued a proclamation, announcing the fact of the acceptance of Miss Dix's services, and on May 1, Surgeon-General Wood cheerfully and thankfully recognized the ability and energy of Miss Dix, and requested all women who offered their services as nurses to report to her. On June 9 the Secretary of War issued an order appointing Henry W. Bellows, D. D., Prof. Alexander D. Bache, Prof. Jeffries Wyman, M. D., William H. Van Buren, M. D., Surg.-Gen. R. C. Wood, U. S. A., Gen. George W. Cullum, of General Scott's staff, and Alexander Shiras, of the United States army, in conjunction with such others as might associate with them, a commission of inquiry and advice in respect of the sanitary interests of the United States forces. The surgeon-general issued a circular announcing the creation of this commission. On June 12 a board of managers was organized, with Dr. Bellows at its head. He submitted a plan of organization, which was adopted,
Alexander Shiras (search for this): entry 5241
e fact of the acceptance of Miss Dix's services, and on May 1, Surgeon-General Wood cheerfully and thankfully recognized the ability and energy of Miss Dix, and requested all women who offered their services as nurses to report to her. On June 9 the Secretary of War issued an order appointing Henry W. Bellows, D. D., Prof. Alexander D. Bache, Prof. Jeffries Wyman, M. D., William H. Van Buren, M. D., Surg.-Gen. R. C. Wood, U. S. A., Gen. George W. Cullum, of General Scott's staff, and Alexander Shiras, of the United States army, in conjunction with such others as might associate with them, a commission of inquiry and advice in respect of the sanitary interests of the United States forces. The surgeon-general issued a circular announcing the creation of this commission. On June 12 a board of managers was organized, with Dr. Bellows at its head. He submitted a plan of organization, which was adopted, and it became the constitution of the commission, bearing the signatures of Presid
Simon Cameron (search for this): entry 5241
army, in conjunction with such others as might associate with them, a commission of inquiry and advice in respect of the sanitary interests of the United States forces. The surgeon-general issued a circular announcing the creation of this commission. On June 12 a board of managers was organized, with Dr. Bellows at its head. He submitted a plan of organization, which was adopted, and it became the constitution of the commission, bearing the signatures of President Lincoln and Secretary of War Simon Cameron. The name now assumed was The United States Sanitary commission. Frederick Law Olmsted was chosen resident secretary—a post of great importance, for that officer was really the general manager of the affairs of the commission. Its seal bore the name and date of creation of the commission; also a shield bearing the figure of Mercy, winged, with the symbol of Christianity upon her bosom and a cup of consolation in her hand, coming down from the clouds to visit wounded soldiers o
Almena Bates (search for this): entry 5241
sailors during the American Civil War, the other body being the United States Christian commission (q. v.). The corporate names of the two organizations indicate their respective spheres of operation. On the day that President Lincoln issued his call for 75,000 men, the women of Bridgeport, Conn., organized a society for the purpose of affording relief and comfort to the volunteers. This was the first in all the land. On the same day (April 15, 1861) a woman in Charlestown, Mass. (Miss Almena Bates), took steps to form a similar organization, and a few days later the women of Lowell did the same. They proposed to supply nurses for the sick and wounded, and provisions, clothing, and other comforts not furnished by the government; also to send books and newspapers to the camps, and to keep up a constant communication with their friends in the field. On the 19th the women of Cleveland, O., formed an association for the purpose of taking care of the families of the volunteers. E
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