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ere revealed from heaven that 999 were to perish, and one of 1,000 were to survive and retain his liberty. One such freeman must possess more virtue, and enjoy more happiness. than 1,000 slaves; and let him propagate his like, and transmit to them what he has so nobly preserved. Mr. Adams assisted in drafting the State constitution of Massachusetts (1779), was president of his State Senate (1781), member of his State Convention that ratified the national Constitution. lieutenant-governor (1789-94), and governor (1794-97 ). He sympathized with the French Revolutionists, and was a Jeffersonian Democrat in politics in his latter days. The purity of his life and his inflexible integrity were attested by friends and foes. Hutchinson, in a letter to his government, said he was of such an obstinate and inflexible disposition that no gift nor office would ever conciliate him. His piety was sincere, and he was a thoroughbred Puritan. Without fortune. without a profession, he depended o
olonial governors. He proposed the first Committee of Correspondence in Massachusetts in 1772; and, when General Gage besought him to make his peace with the King, he replied, I trust I have made my peace with the King of kings. No personal considerations shall induce me to abandon the righteous cause of my country. In 1774 he was the chief in maturing the plan for a Continental Congress; was a member of it; and served in that body most efficiently from that time until 1781. As early as 1769 Mr. Adams advocated the independence of the colonies, and was one of the warmest supporters of it in the Congress. When debating on the Declaration of Independence, Adams said: I should advise persisting in our struggle for liberty though it were revealed from heaven that 999 were to perish, and one of 1,000 were to survive and retain his liberty. One such freeman must possess more virtue, and enjoy more happiness. than 1,000 slaves; and let him propagate his like, and transmit to them wha
September 27th, 1722 AD (search for this): entry adams-samuel
Adams, Samuel, 1722-1803 Patriot: born in Boston, Sept. 27, 1722; was graduated at Harvard College in 1742, and was honored with the degree of Ll.D. by it in 1792. The tendency of his mind was shown when, at the age of twenty-one. receiving the degree of A. M., he proposed, and took the affirmative on, the question Whether it be lawful to resist the supreme magistrate if the commonwealth cannot otherwise be preserved? He published a pamphlet at about the same time entitled Englishmen's rights. He became an unsuccessful merchant, but a successful writer: and gained great popularity by his political essays against the administration of Governor Shirley. Stern in morals. a born republican, and with courage equal to his convictions, Samuel Adams was a natural leader of the opposers of the Stamp Act and kindred measures of Parliament, and from that period (1765) until the independence of the colonies was achieved he was a foremost leader of the patriot host. He suggested Samu
October 2nd, 1803 AD (search for this): entry adams-samuel
Hutchinson, in a letter to his government, said he was of such an obstinate and inflexible disposition that no gift nor office would ever conciliate him. His piety was sincere, and he was a thoroughbred Puritan. Without fortune. without a profession, he depended on moderate salaries and emoluments of police; and for almost fifty years a daily maintenance, frugal in the extreme, was eked out by the industry and prudence of his second wife. whom he married in 1757. He died in Boston, Oct. 2, 1803. Samuel Adams and John Hancock were regarded as arch-rebels by General Gage, and he resolved to arrest them and send them to England to be tried for treason. A capital part of his scheme, in sending out the expedition to Lexington and Concord (April 18-19, 1775), was the seizure of these patriots, who, members of the Provincial Congress, had tarried at Lexington on being informed of Gage's intention to arrest them on their return to Boston. They were at the house of Rev. Jonas Clarke
if the commonwealth cannot otherwise be preserved? He published a pamphlet at about the same time entitled Englishmen's rights. He became an unsuccessful merchant, but a successful writer: and gained great popularity by his political essays against the administration of Governor Shirley. Stern in morals. a born republican, and with courage equal to his convictions, Samuel Adams was a natural leader of the opposers of the Stamp Act and kindred measures of Parliament, and from that period (1765) until the independence of the colonies was achieved he was a foremost leader of the patriot host. He suggested Samuel Adams. the Stamp Act Congress, and was a continual object of dread and hatred to the colonial governors. He proposed the first Committee of Correspondence in Massachusetts in 1772; and, when General Gage besought him to make his peace with the King, he replied, I trust I have made my peace with the King of kings. No personal considerations shall induce me to abandon the
t 999 were to perish, and one of 1,000 were to survive and retain his liberty. One such freeman must possess more virtue, and enjoy more happiness. than 1,000 slaves; and let him propagate his like, and transmit to them what he has so nobly preserved. Mr. Adams assisted in drafting the State constitution of Massachusetts (1779), was president of his State Senate (1781), member of his State Convention that ratified the national Constitution. lieutenant-governor (1789-94), and governor (1794-97 ). He sympathized with the French Revolutionists, and was a Jeffersonian Democrat in politics in his latter days. The purity of his life and his inflexible integrity were attested by friends and foes. Hutchinson, in a letter to his government, said he was of such an obstinate and inflexible disposition that no gift nor office would ever conciliate him. His piety was sincere, and he was a thoroughbred Puritan. Without fortune. without a profession, he depended on moderate salaries and emol
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