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Anne Arundel (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
Annapolis, City. county seat of Anne Arundel county, and capital of the State of Maryland: on the Severn River, 20 miles south by east of Baltimore: is the seat of the United States Naval Academy and of St. John's College; population in 1890, 7,604; 1900, 8,402. Puritan refugees from Massachusetts, led by Durand, a ruling elder, settled on the site of Annapolis in 1649, and, in imitation of Roger Williams, called the place Providence. The next year a commissioner of Lord Baltimore organized there the county of Anne Arundel, so named in compliment to Lady Baltimore, and Providence was called Anne Arundel Town. A few years later it again bore the name of Providence, and became the seat of Protestant influence and of a Protestant government, disputing the legislative authority with the Roman Catholic government at the ancient capital, St. Mary's. In 1694 the latter was abandoned as the capital of the province, and the seat of government was established on the Severn. The villag
Perryville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
rouble, and he took counsel with (Gen. Robert Patterson, the commander of the Department of Washington. He also consulted Commodore Dupont, commander of the navy-yard there, and it was agreed that the troops under General Butler should go from Perryville, on the Susquehanna, to Annapolis, by water, and thence across Maryland, seizing and holding Annapolis Junction by the way. Butler laid before his officers a plan which contemplated seizing and holding Annapolis as a means of communication, and to make a forced march with a part of his troops from that port to Washington. He wrote to the governor of Massachusetts to send the Boston Light Artillery to Annapolis, and the next morning he proceeded with his troops to Perryville, embarked in the powerful steam ferry-boat Maryland. and at a little past midnight reached Annapolis. The town and Naval Aeademy were in the hands of the Confederates, and were all lighted up in expectation of the arrival of a body of Confederates, by water, fr
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
n's College; population in 1890, 7,604; 1900, 8,402. Puritan refugees from Massachusetts, led by Durand, a ruling elder, settled on the site of Annapolis in 1649, a14, 1755, General Braddock and Commodore Keppel, with Governors Shirley, of Massachusetts; De Lancey, of New York; Morris, of Pennsylvania; Sharpe. of Maryland, andstinction as to religious belief. The convention fully resolved to sustain Massachusetts, and meet force by force if necessary. Gen. B. F. Butler was in Philadelphia on April 19, 1861, when he first heard of the assault on Massachusetts troop in Baltimore. He had orders to go to Washington through Baltimore. It was evidentrt of his troops from that port to Washington. He wrote to the governor of Massachusetts to send the Boston Light Artillery to Annapolis, and the next morning he prmilitary possession of Annapolis and the railway to Annapolis Junction. Two Massachusetts companies seized the railway station, in which they found a disabled locomo
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
ital of the State of Maryland: on the Severn River, 20 miles south by east of Baltimore: is the seat of the United States Naval Academy and of St. John's College; po and extensive commerce, being a port of entry long before the foundations of Baltimore were laid. On the morning of Oct. 15, 1774, a vessel owned by Anthony Stew April 19, 1861, when he first heard of the assault on Massachusetts troop in Baltimore. He had orders to go to Washington through Baltimore. It was evident that hBaltimore. It was evident that he could not do so without trouble, and he took counsel with (Gen. Robert Patterson, the commander of the Department of Washington. He also consulted Commodore Duponed up in expectation of the arrival of a body of Confederates, by water, from Baltimore, to assist them in seizing the venerable and venerated frigate Constitution, ilway to within 4 miles of the capital. The 7th Regiment were the first troops that reached Washington after the tragedy at Baltimore a week before. See Baltimore.
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
had gathered in large numbers from the surrounding country. Charles Carroll and others, fearing mob violence, advised Stewart to burn the vessel and cargo with his own hands, which he did. The vessel was run ashore and destroyed, when the people cheered and dispersed. This was the last attempt at importation of tea into the English-American colonies. On April 14, 1755, General Braddock and Commodore Keppel, with Governors Shirley, of Massachusetts; De Lancey, of New York; Morris, of Pennsylvania; Sharpe. of Maryland, and Dinwiddie. of Virginia. held a congress at Annapolis. Braddock had lately arrived as commander-in-chief of the British forces in America. Under his instructions, he first of all directed the attention of the government to the necessity of raising a revenue in America. He expressed astonishment that no such fund was already established. The governors told him of their strifes with their respective assemblies, and assured Braddock that no such fund could eve
Severn River (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
Annapolis, City. county seat of Anne Arundel county, and capital of the State of Maryland: on the Severn River, 20 miles south by east of Baltimore: is the seat of the United States Naval Academy and of St. John's College; population in 1890, 7,604; 1900, 8,402. Puritan refugees from Massachusetts, led by Durand, a ruling elder, settled on the site of Annapolis in 1649, and, in imitation of Roger Williams, called the place Providence. The next year a commissioner of Lord Baltimore organized there the county of Anne Arundel, so named in compliment to Lady Baltimore, and Providence was called Anne Arundel Town. A few years later it again bore the name of Providence, and became the seat of Protestant influence and of a Protestant government, disputing the legislative authority with the Roman Catholic government at the ancient capital, St. Mary's. In 1694 the latter was abandoned as the capital of the province, and the seat of government was established on the Severn. The village
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
nnapolis, City. county seat of Anne Arundel county, and capital of the State of Maryland: on the Severn River, 20 miles south by east of Baltimore: is the seat ofs, in honor of Queen Anne. It has remained the permanent political capital of Maryland. It was distinguished for the refinement and wealth of its inhabitants and exof Massachusetts; De Lancey, of New York; Morris, of Pennsylvania; Sharpe. of Maryland, and Dinwiddie. of Virginia. held a congress at Annapolis. Braddock had latfrom Perryville, on the Susquehanna, to Annapolis, by water, and thence across Maryland, seizing and holding Annapolis Junction by the way. Butler laid before his offof Annapolis. To their remonstrances against his landing and marching through Maryland, Butler replied that the orders and demands of his government were imperative, He assured them that peaceable citizens should be unmolested and the laws of Maryland be respected. On the 22d the New York 7th Regiment, Colonel Lefferts, arriv
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry annapolis
mblies, and assured Braddock that no such fund could ever be established in the colonies without the aid of Parliament. The Congress then resolved unanimously that it was the opinion of its members that it should be proposed to his Majesty's \ministers to find out some method of compelling the colonists to establish such a public fund, and for assessing the several governments in proportion to their respective abilities. At once all the crown officers in America sent voluminous letters to England, urging such a measure upon the government. On July 26, 1775, a convention assembled at Annapolis, and formed a temporary government, which, recognizing the Continental Congress as invested with a general supervision of public affairs, managed its own internal affairs through a provincial Committee of Safety and subordinate executive committees, appointed in every county, parish, or hundred. It directed the enrolment of forty companies of minute-men, authorized the emission of over $500
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
Annapolis, City. county seat of Anne Arundel county, and capital of the State of Maryland: on the Severn River, 20 miles south by east of Baltimore: is the seat of the United States Naval Academy and of St. John's College; population in 1890, 7,604; 1900, 8,402. Puritan refugees from Massachusetts, led by Durand, a ruling elder, settled on the site of Annapolis in 1649, and, in imitation of Roger Williams, called the place Providence. The next year a commissioner of Lord Baltimore organized there the county of Anne Arundel, so named in compliment to Lady Baltimore, and Providence was called Anne Arundel Town. A few years later it again bore the name of Providence, and became the seat of Protestant influence and of a Protestant government, disputing the legislative authority with the Roman Catholic government at the ancient capital, St. Mary's. In 1694 the latter was abandoned as the capital of the province, and the seat of government was established on the Severn. The villag
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry annapolis
ettled on the site of Annapolis in 1649, and, in imitation of Roger Williams, called the place Providence. The next year a commissioner of Lord Baltimore organized there the county of Anne Arundel, so named in compliment to Lady Baltimore, and Providence was called Anne Arundel Town. A few years later it again bore the name of Providence, and became the seat of Protestant influence and of a Protestant government, disputing the legislative authority with the Roman Catholic government at the anProvidence, and became the seat of Protestant influence and of a Protestant government, disputing the legislative authority with the Roman Catholic government at the ancient capital, St. Mary's. In 1694 the latter was abandoned as the capital of the province, and the seat of government was established on the Severn. The village was finally incorporated a city, and named Annapolis, in honor of Queen Anne. It has remained the permanent political capital of Maryland. It was distinguished for the refinement and wealth of its inhabitants and extensive commerce, being a port of entry long before the foundations of Baltimore were laid. On the morning of Oct. 15
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