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Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry appomattox-court-house
Appomattox Court-House, The seat of government of Appomattox county, Va., about 25 miles east of Lynchburg; famous as the scene of the surrender of General M'Lean's House, the place of Lee's Scrrender. Lee to General Grant. The Army of Northern Virginia was reduced by famine, disease, death, wounds, and capture to a feeble few. These struggled against enormous odds with almost unexampled fortitude, but were compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and strength. On April 8, a portion of Sheridan's cavalry, under General Custer, supported by Devine, captured four Confederate supply-trains at Appomattox Station, on the Lynchburg Railroad. Lee's vanguard approaching, were pushed back to Appomattox Court-House, 5 miles northward — near which was Lee's main army — losing twenty-five guns and many wagons and prisoners. Sheridan hurried forward the remainder of his command, and on that evening he stood directly across Lee's pathway of retreat. Lee's last avenue of escape was c
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry appomattox-court-house
Appomattox Court-House, The seat of government of Appomattox county, Va., about 25 miles east of Lynchburg; famous as the scene of the surrender of General M'Lean's House, the place of Lee's Scrrender. Lee to General Grant. The Army of Northern Virginia was reduced by famine, disease, death, wounds, and capture to a feeble few. These struggled against enormous odds with almost unexampled fortitude, but were compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and strength. On April 8, a portion of Sheridan's cavalry, under General Custer, supported by Devine, captured four Confederate supply-trains at Appomattox Station, on the Lynchburg Railroad. Lee's vanguard approaching, were pushed back to Appomattox Court-House, 5 miles northward — near which was Lee's main army — losing twenty-five guns and many wagons and prisoners. Sheridan hurried forward the remainder of his command, and on that evening he stood directly across Lee's pathway of retreat. Lee's last avenue of escape was cl
United States (United States) (search for this): entry appomattox-court-house
ded by Colonel Marshall, his adjutant-general. The terms of surrender were discussed and settled, in the form of a written proposition by Grant, and a written acceptance by Lee, and at 3.30 P. M. they were signed. The terms prescribed by Grant were extraordinary, under the circumstances, in their leniency and magnanimity, and Lee was much touched by them. They simply required Lee and his men to give their parole of honor that they would not take up arms against the government of the United States until regularly exchanged: gave to the officers their side-arms, baggage, and private horses; and pledged the faith of the government that they should not be punished for their treason and rebellion so long as they should respect that parole and be obedient to law. Grant, at the suggestion of Lee, agreed to allow such cavalrymen of the Confederate army as owned their own horses to retain them, as they would, he said, need them for tilling their farms. Lee now returned to Richmond, where
George Armstrong Custer (search for this): entry appomattox-court-house
of government of Appomattox county, Va., about 25 miles east of Lynchburg; famous as the scene of the surrender of General M'Lean's House, the place of Lee's Scrrender. Lee to General Grant. The Army of Northern Virginia was reduced by famine, disease, death, wounds, and capture to a feeble few. These struggled against enormous odds with almost unexampled fortitude, but were compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and strength. On April 8, a portion of Sheridan's cavalry, under General Custer, supported by Devine, captured four Confederate supply-trains at Appomattox Station, on the Lynchburg Railroad. Lee's vanguard approaching, were pushed back to Appomattox Court-House, 5 miles northward — near which was Lee's main army — losing twenty-five guns and many wagons and prisoners. Sheridan hurried forward the remainder of his command, and on that evening he stood directly across Lee's pathway of retreat. Lee's last avenue of escape was closed, and on the following day he met
surrender of General M'Lean's House, the place of Lee's Scrrender. Lee to General Grant. The Army of Northern Virginia was reduced by famine, disease, death, wount. Lee's last avenue of escape was closed, and on the following day he met General Grant at the residence of Wilmer McLean, at Appomattox Court-House, to consummatemmanders met, with courteous recognition, at 2 P. M., on Palm Sunday (April 9). Grant was accompanied by his chief of staff, Colonel Parker; Lee was attended by Colof surrender were discussed and settled, in the form of a written proposition by Grant, and a written acceptance by Lee, and at 3.30 P. M. they were signed. The terms prescribed by Grant were extraordinary, under the circumstances, in their leniency and magnanimity, and Lee was much touched by them. They simply required Lee andnd rebellion so long as they should respect that parole and be obedient to law. Grant, at the suggestion of Lee, agreed to allow such cavalrymen of the Confederate a
enty-five guns and many wagons and prisoners. Sheridan hurried forward the remainder of his command, and on that evening he stood directly across Lee's pathway of retreat. Lee's last avenue of escape was closed, and on the following day he met General Grant at the residence of Wilmer McLean, at Appomattox Court-House, to consummate an act of surrender. The two commanders met, with courteous recognition, at 2 P. M., on Palm Sunday (April 9). Grant was accompanied by his chief of staff, Colonel Parker; Lee was attended by Colonel Marshall, his adjutant-general. The terms of surrender were discussed and settled, in the form of a written proposition by Grant, and a written acceptance by Lee, and at 3.30 P. M. they were signed. The terms prescribed by Grant were extraordinary, under the circumstances, in their leniency and magnanimity, and Lee was much touched by them. They simply required Lee and his men to give their parole of honor that they would not take up arms against the gov
tox county, Va., about 25 miles east of Lynchburg; famous as the scene of the surrender of General M'Lean's House, the place of Lee's Scrrender. Lee to General Grant. The Army of Northern Virginia was reduced by famine, disease, death, wounds, and capture to a feeble few. These struggled against enormous odds with almost unexampled fortitude, but were compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and strength. On April 8, a portion of Sheridan's cavalry, under General Custer, supported by Devine, captured four Confederate supply-trains at Appomattox Station, on the Lynchburg Railroad. Lee's vanguard approaching, were pushed back to Appomattox Court-House, 5 miles northward — near which was Lee's main army — losing twenty-five guns and many wagons and prisoners. Sheridan hurried forward the remainder of his command, and on that evening he stood directly across Lee's pathway of retreat. Lee's last avenue of escape was closed, and on the following day he met General Grant at the res
isoners. Sheridan hurried forward the remainder of his command, and on that evening he stood directly across Lee's pathway of retreat. Lee's last avenue of escape was closed, and on the following day he met General Grant at the residence of Wilmer McLean, at Appomattox Court-House, to consummate an act of surrender. The two commanders met, with courteous recognition, at 2 P. M., on Palm Sunday (April 9). Grant was accompanied by his chief of staff, Colonel Parker; Lee was attended by Colonel Marshall, his adjutant-general. The terms of surrender were discussed and settled, in the form of a written proposition by Grant, and a written acceptance by Lee, and at 3.30 P. M. they were signed. The terms prescribed by Grant were extraordinary, under the circumstances, in their leniency and magnanimity, and Lee was much touched by them. They simply required Lee and his men to give their parole of honor that they would not take up arms against the government of the United States until re
ender of General M'Lean's House, the place of Lee's Scrrender. Lee to General Grant. The Army ofLee to General Grant. The Army of Northern Virginia was reduced by famine, disease, death, wounds, and capture to a feeble few. ThesAppomattox Station, on the Lynchburg Railroad. Lee's vanguard approaching, were pushed back to AppCourt-House, 5 miles northward — near which was Lee's main army — losing twenty-five guns and many d, and on that evening he stood directly across Lee's pathway of retreat. Lee's last avenue of escLee's last avenue of escape was closed, and on the following day he met General Grant at the residence of Wilmer McLean, atompanied by his chief of staff, Colonel Parker; Lee was attended by Colonel Marshall, his adjutant-stances, in their leniency and magnanimity, and Lee was much touched by them. They simply required Lee and his men to give their parole of honor that they would not take up arms against the governmbe obedient to law. Grant, at the suggestion of Lee, agreed to allow such cavalrymen of the Confede[3 more...]<
inia was reduced by famine, disease, death, wounds, and capture to a feeble few. These struggled against enormous odds with almost unexampled fortitude, but were compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and strength. On April 8, a portion of Sheridan's cavalry, under General Custer, supported by Devine, captured four Confederate supply-trains at Appomattox Station, on the Lynchburg Railroad. Lee's vanguard approaching, were pushed back to Appomattox Court-House, 5 miles northward — near which was Lee's main army — losing twenty-five guns and many wagons and prisoners. Sheridan hurried forward the remainder of his command, and on that evening he stood directly across Lee's pathway of retreat. Lee's last avenue of escape was closed, and on the following day he met General Grant at the residence of Wilmer McLean, at Appomattox Court-House, to consummate an act of surrender. The two commanders met, with courteous recognition, at 2 P. M., on Palm Sunday (April 9). Grant was accompan
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