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Lancaster Sound (Canada) (search for this): entry arctic-exploration
over a northwest passage, he found Hudson Bay, and perished (1610) on its bosom. In 1616 Baffin explored the bay called by his name, and entered the mouth of Lancaster Sound. After that, for fifty years, no navigator went so far north in that direction. In 1720 the Hudson Bay Company sent Captains Knight and Barlow to search f explorations was scientific, and not commercial. Buchan and Franklin went by way of Spitzbergen; but they only penetrated to 80° 34′. Ross and Parry entered Lancaster Sound, explored its coasts, and Ross returned with the impression that it was a bay. Parry did not agree with him in this opinion, and he sailed on a further explorrror--each fitted with a small steam-engine and screw-propeller, he sailed from England May 19, 1845. They were seen by a whale-ship, in July, about to enter Lancaster Sound, and were never heard of afterwards. The British government despatched three expeditions in search of them in 1848. One of them was an overland expedition un
America (Netherlands) (search for this): entry arctic-exploration
Sir John Franklin yet believed a northwest passage possible. With two vessels — the Erebus and Terror--each fitted with a small steam-engine and screw-propeller, he sailed from England May 19, 1845. They were seen by a whale-ship, in July, about to enter Lancaster Sound, and were never heard of afterwards. The British government despatched three expeditions in search of them in 1848. One of them was an overland expedition under Sir John Richardson, who traversed the northern coast of America 800 miles, in 1848, without finding Franklin. The sea expedition was equally unfortunate. Dr. Rae failed in an overland search in 1850. Three more expeditions were sent out by the British government in search in 1850; and from Great Britain five others were fitted out by private means. One was also sent by the United States government, chiefly at the cost of Henry Grinnell, a New York merchant. It was commanded by Lieutenant De Haven, of the navy. There were two ships, the Advance and
o far north in that direction. In 1720 the Hudson Bay Company sent Captains Knight and Barlow to search for a northwest passage to India. They sailed with a ship and sloop, and were never heard of afterwards. In 1741 Vitus Bering discovered the strait that bears his name, having set sail from a port in Kamtchatka. In that region Bering perished. Russian navigators tried in vain to solve the problem. Between 1769 and 1772 Samuel Hearne made three overland journeys in America to the Arctic Ocean. The British government having, in 1743, offered $100,000 to the crew who should accomplish a northwest passage, stimulated efforts in that direction. Captain Phipps (Lord Mulgrave) attempted to reach the north pole in 1773; and before setting out on his last voyage (1776), Captain Cook was instructed to attempt to penetrate the polar sea by Bering Strait. He went only as far as 70° 45′. In 1817 Captain Ross and Lieutenant Parry sailed for the polar sea from England; and the same year
Arctic exploration. During almost four hundred years efforts have been made by European navigators to discover a passage for vessels through the Arctic seas to India. The stories of Marco Polo of the magnificent countries in Eastern Asia and ae three voyages in that direction in 1594-96, and perished on his third voyage. Henry Hudson tried to round the north of Europe and Asia in 1607-08, but failed, and, pushing for the lower latitudes of the American coast, discovered the river that be the polar waters. The same year. and for some time afterwards, several expeditions were sent out from the continent of Europe. Finally, by the help of Congress, Captain Hall was enabled to sail, with a well-furnished company, in the ship Polaris,rn he suddenly sickened and died, and the Polaris returned without accomplishing much. The passage from the coast of western Europe, around the north of that continent and of Asia, into the Pacific Ocean, was first accomplished in the summer of 1879
much. The passage from the coast of western Europe, around the north of that continent and of Asia, into the Pacific Ocean, was first accomplished in the summer of 1879, by Professor Nordenskjold, an accomplished Swedish explorer, in the steamship Vega. She passed through Bering Strait into the Pacific Ocean, and reached Japan in the first week in September. Thus the great problem has been solved. the Jeannette, Lieutenant De Long, an American exploring vessel, was lost on the coast of Siberia, in 1881. The most important of the recent expeditions into Arctic legions by Americans are those of Lieut. (now Brig.-Gen.) Adolphus W. Greely and of Lieut. Robert E. Peary (qq. v.), who has made several voyages into northern waters, and in 1900 was still there. Lieutenant Greely was sent from the United States in 1881, by the government, charged with establishing a series of stations about the pole for the purpose of observation. Lieutenants Lockwood and Brainard, of his force, succ
made by European navigators to discover a passage for vessels through the Arctic seas to India. The stories of Marco Polo of the magnificent countries in Eastern Asia and adjacent islands — Cathay and Zipangi, China and Japan--stimulated desires to accomplish such a passage. The Cabots [John Cabot; Sebastian Cabot (q. v.)] went in the direction of the pole, northwestward, at or near the close of the fifteenth century, and penetrated as far north as 67° 30′, or half-way up to (present) Davis Strait. The next explorers were the brothers Cortereal, who made three voyages in that direction, 1500-02. In 1553 Sir Hugh Willoughby set out to find a northwest passage to India, but was driven back from Nova Zembla, and perished on the shore of Lapland. In 1576-78 Martin Frobisher made three voyages to find a northwest passage into the Pacific Ocean, and discovered the entrance to Hudson Bay. Between 1585 and 1587 John Davis discovered the strait that bears his name. The Dutch made stren
United States (United States) (search for this): entry arctic-exploration
vain to solve the problem. Between 1769 and 1772 Samuel Hearne made three overland journeys in America to the Arctic Ocean. The British government having, in 1743, offered $100,000 to the crew who en given up as lost. Another party had started in search of Ross, explored the north coast of America, and discovered Victoria Land. Other land expeditions followed; and one, under Dr. John Rae, c. Hayes, a member of Kane's expedition, and Capt. Chas. F. Hall. The latter returned to the United States in 1860, and Dr. Haves in 1861. Hall sailed again in 1864, and returned in 1869. The Germaages into northern waters, and in 1900 was still there. Lieutenant Greely was sent from the United States in 1881, by the government, charged with establishing a series of stations about the pole fo were dying of hunger, by Lieutenant Peary, in charge of two government vessels, sent by the United States to the relief of Greely in 1882. Lieutenant Peary made other voyages to the Arctic waters in
complish such a passage. The Cabots [John Cabot; Sebastian Cabot (q. v.)] went in the direction of the pole, northwestward, at or near the close of the fifteenth century, and penetrated as far north as 67° 30′, or half-way up to (present) Davis Strait. The next explorers were the brothers Cortereal, who made three voyages in that direction, 1500-02. In 1553 Sir Hugh Willoughby set out to find a northwest passage to India, but was driven back from Nova Zembla, and perished on the shore of Lapland. In 1576-78 Martin Frobisher made three voyages to find a northwest passage into the Pacific Ocean, and discovered the entrance to Hudson Bay. Between 1585 and 1587 John Davis discovered the strait that bears his name. The Dutch made strenuous efforts to discover a northeast passage. Willem Barentz (q. v.) made three voyages in that direction in 1594-96, and perished on his third voyage. Henry Hudson tried to round the north of Europe and Asia in 1607-08, but failed, and, pushing for t
Cathay (North Dakota, United States) (search for this): entry arctic-exploration
Arctic exploration. During almost four hundred years efforts have been made by European navigators to discover a passage for vessels through the Arctic seas to India. The stories of Marco Polo of the magnificent countries in Eastern Asia and adjacent islands — Cathay and Zipangi, China and Japan--stimulated desires to accomplish such a passage. The Cabots [John Cabot; Sebastian Cabot (q. v.)] went in the direction of the pole, northwestward, at or near the close of the fifteenth century, and penetrated as far north as 67° 30′, or half-way up to (present) Davis Strait. The next explorers were the brothers Cortereal, who made three voyages in that direction, 1500-02. In 1553 Sir Hugh Willoughby set out to find a northwest passage to India, but was driven back from Nova Zembla, and perished on the shore of Lapland. In 1576-78 Martin Frobisher made three voyages to find a northwest passage into the Pacific Ocean, and discovered the entrance to Hudson Bay. Between 1585 and 1587
Nova Zembla (Russia) (search for this): entry arctic-exploration
hina and Japan--stimulated desires to accomplish such a passage. The Cabots [John Cabot; Sebastian Cabot (q. v.)] went in the direction of the pole, northwestward, at or near the close of the fifteenth century, and penetrated as far north as 67° 30′, or half-way up to (present) Davis Strait. The next explorers were the brothers Cortereal, who made three voyages in that direction, 1500-02. In 1553 Sir Hugh Willoughby set out to find a northwest passage to India, but was driven back from Nova Zembla, and perished on the shore of Lapland. In 1576-78 Martin Frobisher made three voyages to find a northwest passage into the Pacific Ocean, and discovered the entrance to Hudson Bay. Between 1585 and 1587 John Davis discovered the strait that bears his name. The Dutch made strenuous efforts to discover a northeast passage. Willem Barentz (q. v.) made three voyages in that direction in 1594-96, and perished on his third voyage. Henry Hudson tried to round the north of Europe and Asia in
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