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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): entry arthur-chester-alan
1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Res the right of voluntary emigration to the United States for the purposes of curiosity or trade, orve to the voluntary emigrant coming to the United States the right to travel there or reside there,odify it so far that the government of the United States might regulate, limit, or suspend the coming of Chinese laborers to the United States, or their residence therein, but that it should not abs United States. In its first article, the United States is empowered to decide whether the coming on upon Chinese subjects proceeding to the United States as teachers, students, merchants, or from n number they meant, for example, that the United States, having, as they supposed, a record of theect explicitly recognized the right of the United States to use some discretion, and have proposed citizens and subjects to reside within the United States and carry on business under the same laws [33 more...]
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): entry arthur-chester-alan
n; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the Senate: To the Senate,--After a careful consideration of Senate Bill No. 71, entitled An act to execute certain treaty stipu
ecute certain treaty stipulations relating to Chinese. I herewith return it to the Senate, in whicviolates the faith of the nation as pledged to China, it will concur with me in rejecting this partiprocal as to citizens of the United States in China. It gave to the voluntary emigrant coming to eral, not reciprocal. It is a concession from China to the United States in limitation of the righ artisans shall be excluded from the class of Chinese laborers, for it is this very competition of we night prohibit the coming or residence of Chinese laborers, there was inserted in the treaty ann be modified to advantage. The classes of Chinese who still enjoy the protection of the Burlingnational wealth and influence. The opening of China to the commerce of the whole world has benefitty. The shoe merchants and cigar merchants of China manufacture the goods they sell at their plac becomes a law it will leave the impression in China that its government strangely misunderstood th[41 more...]
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): entry arthur-chester-alan
antages from this source. Blessed with an exceptional climate, enjoying an unrivalled harbor, with the riches of a great agricultural and mining State in its rear, and the wealth of the whole Union pouring into it over its lines of railroad, San Francisco has before it an incalculable future if our friendly and amicable relations with Asia remain undisturbed. It needs no argument to show that the policy which we now propose to adopt must have a direct tendency to repel Oriental nations from uansit across the United States of Chinese subjects now residing in foreign countries. Large numbers of Chinese live in Cuba, Peru, and other countries, who cannot return home without crossing the territory of the United States or touching at San Francisco. To deny this privilege, it seems to me, is in violation of international law and the comity of nations. and if the bill becomes a law it will in this respect result in great hardship to many thousands of innocent Chinese in foreign countri
te of registration, Chinese residents entitled to remain may be forcibly expelled from the country. 4. If the bill becomes a law it will leave the impression in China that its government strangely misunderstood the character of the treaty, or that the Congress has violated some of its provisions, and this will tend to prejudice the intelligent classes against the United States government and people, whom they now greatly admire and respect. 5. There is no provision in the bill for the transit across the United States of Chinese subjects now residing in foreign countries. Large numbers of Chinese live in Cuba, Peru, and other countries, who cannot return home without crossing the territory of the United States or touching at San Francisco. To deny this privilege, it seems to me, is in violation of international law and the comity of nations. and if the bill becomes a law it will in this respect result in great hardship to many thousands of innocent Chinese in foreign countries.
ives can be required of Chinese. Without expressing an opinion on that point, I may invite the attention of Congress to the fact that the system of personal registration and passports is undemocratic and hostile to the spirit of our institutions. I doubt the wisdom of putting an entering wedge of this kind into our laws. A nation like the United States, jealous of the liberties of its citizens, may well hesitate before it incorporates into its polity a system which is fast disappearing in Europe before the progress of liberal institutions. A wide experience has shown how futile such precautions are, and how easily passports may be borrowed, exchanged, or even forged by persons interested to do so. If it is, nevertheless, thought that a passport is the most convenient way for identifying the Chinese entitled to the protection of the Burlingame treaty, it may still be doubted whether they ought to be required to register. It is certainly our duty, under the Burlingame treaty, to
reaped enormous advantages from this source. Blessed with an exceptional climate, enjoying an unrivalled harbor, with the riches of a great agricultural and mining State in its rear, and the wealth of the whole Union pouring into it over its lines of railroad, San Francisco has before it an incalculable future if our friendly and amicable relations with Asia remain undisturbed. It needs no argument to show that the policy which we now propose to adopt must have a direct tendency to repel Oriental nations from us, and to drive their trade and commerce into more friendly hands. It may be that the great and paramount interest of protecting our labor from Asiatic competition may justify us in a permanent adoption of this policy; but it is wiser in the first place to make a shorter experiment with a view hereafter of maintaining permanently only such features as time and experience may commend. I transmit herewith copies of the papers relating to the recent treaty with China which ac
te of registration, Chinese residents entitled to remain may be forcibly expelled from the country. 4. If the bill becomes a law it will leave the impression in China that its government strangely misunderstood the character of the treaty, or that the Congress has violated some of its provisions, and this will tend to prejudice the intelligent classes against the United States government and people, whom they now greatly admire and respect. 5. There is no provision in the bill for the transit across the United States of Chinese subjects now residing in foreign countries. Large numbers of Chinese live in Cuba, Peru, and other countries, who cannot return home without crossing the territory of the United States or touching at San Francisco. To deny this privilege, it seems to me, is in violation of international law and the comity of nations. and if the bill becomes a law it will in this respect result in great hardship to many thousands of innocent Chinese in foreign countries.
California (California, United States) (search for this): entry arthur-chester-alan
tes under this power would be adapted to such circumstances. For example, there might be a demand for Chinese labor in the South and a surplus of such labor in California, and Congress might legislate in accordance with these facts. In general, the legislation would be in view of and depend upon circumstances of the situation at the same direction. Our intercourse with China is of recent date. Our first treaty with that power is not yet forty years old. It is only since we acquired California and established a great seat of commerce on the Pacific that we may be said to have broken down the barriers which fenced in that ancient monarchy. The Burlingh and influence. The opening of China to the commerce of the whole world has benefited no section of it more than the States of our own Pacific slope. The State of California and its great maritime ports especially have reaped enormous advantages from this source. Blessed with an exceptional climate, enjoying an unrivalled harbo
Fairfield, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): entry arthur-chester-alan
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Republican; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the
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