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Cape Breton Island (Canada) (search for this): entry atlantic-telegraph
ce to Europe. These gentlemen were Peter Cooper, Moses Taylor, Marshall O. Roberts. Chandler White, and Cyrus W. Field. Twenty-five years afterwards. all but one (Mr. White) were living, and again met in the same room, and around the same table whereon that association was signed, with the same attorney of the association then engaged, David Dudley Field. Mr. Cooper was chosen president of the company. Mr. Field procured a cable in England to span the waters between Cape Ray and Cape Breton Island. It was sent out in 1855. and was lost in an attempt to lay it. It was recovered, and was suceessfully laid in 1856. The same year Mr. Field organized in London the Atlantic Telegraph Company to carry the line across the ocean. Mr. Field subscribed for one-fourth of the stock of the company. The American and British governments gave them aid in ships. and during 1857 and 1858 expeditions were at sea, laying a cable across the ocean to Valentia on the western coast of Ireland. Tw
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry atlantic-telegraph
in met in the same room, and around the same table whereon that association was signed, with the same attorney of the association then engaged, David Dudley Field. Mr. Cooper was chosen president of the company. Mr. Field procured a cable in England to span the waters between Cape Ray and Cape Breton Island. It was sent out in 1855. and was lost in an attempt to lay it. It was recovered, and was suceessfully laid in 1856. The same year Mr. Field organized in London the Atlantic Telegraphs labor, during which time Mr. Field crossed the ocean nearly fifty times, he saw the great work accomplished. He had been nobly aided by men in Europe and America. Congress voted him the thanks of the nation and a gold medal, while the Prime Minister of England declared that it was only the fact that he was a citizen of another country that prevented his receiving high honors from the British government. The glory of his achievement transcends all that man could bestow. See cables, Ocean.
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): entry atlantic-telegraph
applied to for aid in completing a land line of telegraph on the Morse plan, then in the course of construction across Newfoundland--about 400 miles. The question occurred to him, Why not carry the line across the ocean? and with his usual pluck andat the house of Mr. Field, on Gramercy Park, New York, and signed an agreement for an association called The New York, Newfoundland. and London Telegraph Company. They obtained from the legislature of Newfoundland a charter guaranteeing an exclusivNewfoundland a charter guaranteeing an exclusive right, for fifty years, to establish a telegraph from the American continent to that island. and thence to Europe. These gentlemen were Peter Cooper, Moses Taylor, Marshall O. Roberts. Chandler White, and Cyrus W. Field. Twenty-five years afterwportions of the cable. met in mid-ocean. July 28, 1858. The portions were spliced. and they sailed for Ireland and Newfoundland respectively. and succeeded in laying a continuous line across the Atlantic. It was 1,950 miles in length, and trave
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry atlantic-telegraph
White) were living, and again met in the same room, and around the same table whereon that association was signed, with the same attorney of the association then engaged, David Dudley Field. Mr. Cooper was chosen president of the company. Mr. Field procured a cable in England to span the waters between Cape Ray and Cape Breton Island. It was sent out in 1855. and was lost in an attempt to lay it. It was recovered, and was suceessfully laid in 1856. The same year Mr. Field organized in London the Atlantic Telegraph Company to carry the line across the ocean. Mr. Field subscribed for one-fourth of the stock of the company. The American and British governments gave them aid in ships. and during 1857 and 1858 expeditions were at sea, laying a cable across the ocean to Valentia on the western coast of Ireland. Twice, in 1857, the attempt failed, but was successful the following year. Two vessels, with portions of the cable. met in mid-ocean. July 28, 1858. The portions were s
island. and thence to Europe. These gentlemen were Peter Cooper, Moses Taylor, Marshall O. Roberts. Chandler White, and Cyrus W. Field. Twenty-five years afterwards. all but one (Mr. White) were living, and again met in the same room, and around the same table whereon that association was signed, with the same attorney of the association then engaged, David Dudley Field. Mr. Cooper was chosen president of the company. Mr. Field procured a cable in England to span the waters between Cape Ray and Cape Breton Island. It was sent out in 1855. and was lost in an attempt to lay it. It was recovered, and was suceessfully laid in 1856. The same year Mr. Field organized in London the Atlantic Telegraph Company to carry the line across the ocean. Mr. Field subscribed for one-fourth of the stock of the company. The American and British governments gave them aid in ships. and during 1857 and 1858 expeditions were at sea, laying a cable across the ocean to Valentia on the western coa
America (Netherlands) (search for this): entry atlantic-telegraph
the Telegraph construction and maintenance Company joined in forming a new association known as the Anglo-American Telegraph Company. with a capital of $3.000,000. Another cable was laid, and permanent electric communication between Europe and America was established July 27. 1866. After twelve years of hard and anxious labor, during which time Mr. Field crossed the ocean nearly fifty times, he saw the great work accomplished. He had been nobly aided by men in Europe and America. Congresss labor, during which time Mr. Field crossed the ocean nearly fifty times, he saw the great work accomplished. He had been nobly aided by men in Europe and America. Congress voted him the thanks of the nation and a gold medal, while the Prime Minister of England declared that it was only the fact that he was a citizen of another country that prevented his receiving high honors from the British government. The glory of his achievement transcends all that man could bestow. See cables, Ocean.
the waters between Cape Ray and Cape Breton Island. It was sent out in 1855. and was lost in an attempt to lay it. It was recovered, and was suceessfully laid in 1856. The same year Mr. Field organized in London the Atlantic Telegraph Company to carry the line across the ocean. Mr. Field subscribed for one-fourth of the stock of the company. The American and British governments gave them aid in ships. and during 1857 and 1858 expeditions were at sea, laying a cable across the ocean to Valentia on the western coast of Ireland. Twice, in 1857, the attempt failed, but was successful the following year. Two vessels, with portions of the cable. met in mid-ocean. July 28, 1858. The portions were spliced. and they sailed for Ireland and Newfoundland respectively. and succeeded in laying a continuous line across the Atlantic. It was 1,950 miles in length, and traversed water two-thirds of the distance over 2 miles in depth. These wonderful facts were communicated by Mr. Field, b
realized. Almost eleven years afterwards an attempt was made to establish telegraphic communication between America and Europe by means of an insulated metallic cable under the sea. Cyrus W. Field, a New York merchant, was applied to for aid in com an exclusive right, for fifty years, to establish a telegraph from the American continent to that island. and thence to Europe. These gentlemen were Peter Cooper, Moses Taylor, Marshall O. Roberts. Chandler White, and Cyrus W. Field. Twenty-five an Telegraph Company. with a capital of $3.000,000. Another cable was laid, and permanent electric communication between Europe and America was established July 27. 1866. After twelve years of hard and anxious labor, during which time Mr. Field crossed the ocean nearly fifty times, he saw the great work accomplished. He had been nobly aided by men in Europe and America. Congress voted him the thanks of the nation and a gold medal, while the Prime Minister of England declared that it was onl
Trinity Bay (Canada) (search for this): entry atlantic-telegraph
reland. Twice, in 1857, the attempt failed, but was successful the following year. Two vessels, with portions of the cable. met in mid-ocean. July 28, 1858. The portions were spliced. and they sailed for Ireland and Newfoundland respectively. and succeeded in laying a continuous line across the Atlantic. It was 1,950 miles in length, and traversed water two-thirds of the distance over 2 miles in depth. These wonderful facts were communicated by Mr. Field, by telegram, from Trinity Bay, Newfoundland, on Aug. 5, 1858, and created intense interest all over the country. The first public messages across the Atlantic were transmitted, Aug. 16, 1858. by Queen Victoria to President Buchanan, and by him in an immediate reply. in which they congratulated each other on the success of the enterprise by which the two countries were connected by such a mysterious tie. The Queen hoped that it would prove an additional link between the nations, whose friendship is founded upon their com
United States (United States) (search for this): entry atlantic-telegraph
Atlantic Telegraph. In 1843 (Aug. 10), Prof. Samuel F. B. Morse, who had endowed the electro-magnetic telegraph with intellectual power. in a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, remarked. after alluding to recent experiments. The practical inference from this law is, that a telegraphic communication on my plan may, with certainty, be established across the Atlantic. Startling as this may now seem, the time will come when this project will be realized. Almost eleven years afterwards an attempt was made to establish telegraphic communication between America and Europe by means of an insulated metallic cable under the sea. Cyrus W. Field, a New York merchant, was applied to for aid in completing a land line of telegraph on the Morse plan, then in the course of construction across Newfoundland--about 400 miles. The question occurred to him, Why not carry the line across the ocean? and with his usual pluck and energy he proceeded to the accomplishment
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