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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry bache-alexander-dallas
and was graduated at the United States Military Academy with high honor in 1825, receiving the appointment of lieutenant of engineers, and remaining in the academy a while as assistant professor. Two years he was under Colonel Totten in the construction of military works in Newport, where he married Miss Fowler, who, as his wife, was his great assistant in astronomical observations. He resigned from the army in 1827, and from that time until 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to scientific pursuits, he made important discoveries. In 1836 he was chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 1841 he became the first principal of the Philadelphia High School; and in 1843 he was appointed superintendent of the United Stat
he construction of military works in Newport, where he married Miss Fowler, who, as his wife, was his great assistant in astronomical observations. He resigned from the army in 1827, and from that time until 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to scientific pursuits, he made important discoveries. In 1836 he was chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 1841 he became the first principal of the Philadelphia High School; and in 1843 he was appointed superintendent of the United States Coast Survey. His services in this field were of the highest importance. Various universities conferred Alexander Dallas Bache. upon him the honorary degree of Ll.D. He published several scientific essays; was a member of the Light-h
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry bache-alexander-dallas
d States Military Academy with high honor in 1825, receiving the appointment of lieutenant of engineers, and remaining in the academy a while as assistant professor. Two years he was under Colonel Totten in the construction of military works in Newport, where he married Miss Fowler, who, as his wife, was his great assistant in astronomical observations. He resigned from the army in 1827, and from that time until 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to sities conferred Alexander Dallas Bache. upon him the honorary degree of Ll.D. He published several scientific essays; was a member of the Light-house Board; a regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and active in various public labors. Dr. Bache bequeathed $42,000 to the Academy of Natural Science in Philadelphia, for the promotion of researches in physical and natural science, by assisting experimenters and observers. He died in Newport, R. I., Feb. 17, 1867. See coast and Geodetic survey.
Philadelphia (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry bache-alexander-dallas
Bache, Alexander Dallas, 1806- Physicist; born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 19. 1806; was a great-grandson of Dr. Franklin, and was graduated at the United States Military Academy with high honor in 1825, receiving the appointment of lieutenant of engineers, and remaining in the academy a while as assistant professor. Two years he was under Colonel Totten in the construction of military works in Newport, where he married Miss Fowler, who, as his wife, was his great assistant in astronomical observations. He resigned from the army in 1827, and from that time until 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to scientific pursuits, he made important discoveries. In 1836 he was chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 184
Bache, Alexander Dallas, 1806- Physicist; born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 19. 1806; was a great-grandson of Dr. Franklin, and was graduated at the United States Military Academy with high honor in 1825, receiving the appointment of lieutenant of engineers, and remaining in the academy a while as assistant professor. Two years he was under Colonel Totten in the construction of military works in Newport, where he married Miss Fowler, who, as his wife, was his great assistant in astronomical observations. He resigned from the army in 1827, and from that time until 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to scientific pursuits, he made important discoveries. In 1836 he was chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 1841
William Chauncey Fowler (search for this): entry bache-alexander-dallas
Bache, Alexander Dallas, 1806- Physicist; born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 19. 1806; was a great-grandson of Dr. Franklin, and was graduated at the United States Military Academy with high honor in 1825, receiving the appointment of lieutenant of engineers, and remaining in the academy a while as assistant professor. Two years he was under Colonel Totten in the construction of military works in Newport, where he married Miss Fowler, who, as his wife, was his great assistant in astronomical observations. He resigned from the army in 1827, and from that time until 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to scientific pursuits, he made important discoveries. In 1836 he was chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 184
Bache, Alexander Dallas, 1806- Physicist; born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 19. 1806; was a great-grandson of Dr. Franklin, and was graduated at the United States Military Academy with high honor in 1825, receiving the appointment of lieutenant of engineers, and remaining in the academy a while as assistant professor. Two years he was under Colonel Totten in the construction of military works in Newport, where he married Miss Fowler, who, as his wife, was his great assistant in astronomical observations. He resigned from the army in 1827, and from that time until 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to scientific pursuits, he made important discoveries. In 1836 he was chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 1841
Alexander Dallas Bache (search for this): entry bache-alexander-dallas
Bache, Alexander Dallas, 1806- Physicist; born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 19. 1806; was a great-grandson of Dr. Franklin, and was graduated at the United States Military Academy with high honor in 1825, receiving the appointment of lieutenant of engineers, and remaining in the academy a while as assistant professor. Two years appointed superintendent of the United States Coast Survey. His services in this field were of the highest importance. Various universities conferred Alexander Dallas Bache. upon him the honorary degree of Ll.D. He published several scientific essays; was a member of the Light-house Board; a regent of the Smithsonian Institut of the Smithsonian Institution, and active in various public labors. Dr. Bache bequeathed $42,000 to the Academy of Natural Science in Philadelphia, for the promotion of researches in physical and natural science, by assisting experimenters and observers. He died in Newport, R. I., Feb. 17, 1867. See coast and Geodetic survey.
February 17th, 1867 AD (search for this): entry bache-alexander-dallas
as chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 1841 he became the first principal of the Philadelphia High School; and in 1843 he was appointed superintendent of the United States Coast Survey. His services in this field were of the highest importance. Various universities conferred Alexander Dallas Bache. upon him the honorary degree of Ll.D. He published several scientific essays; was a member of the Light-house Board; a regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and active in various public labors. Dr. Bache bequeathed $42,000 to the Academy of Natural Science in Philadelphia, for the promotion of researches in physical and natural science, by assisting experimenters and observers. He died in Newport, R. I., Feb. 17, 1867. See coast and Geodetic survey.
l 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to scientific pursuits, he made important discoveries. In 1836 he was chosen president of the board of trustees of Girard College, and he was very efficient in the organization of that institution. He visited Europe to study various institutions of learning there; and in 1839 he published a Report on the European system of Edducationi. In 1841 he became the first principal of the Philadelphia High School; and in 1843 he was appointed superintendent of the United States Coast Survey. His services in this field were of the highest importance. Various universities conferred Alexander Dallas Bache. upon him the honorary degree of Ll.D. He published several scientific essays; was a member of the Light-house Board; a regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and active in various public labors. Dr. Bache bequeathed $42,000 to the Academy of Natural Science in Philadelphia, for the promotion of researches in p
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