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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 18 total hits in 15 results.

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New York (New York, United States) (search for this): entry bard-samuel
cian; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent physician. He died May 24. 1821.
James Robertson (search for this): entry bard-samuel
Bard, Samuel, 1742- Physician; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent ph
John Washington (search for this): entry bard-samuel
cian; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent physician. He died May 24. 1821.
Bard, Samuel, 1742- Physician; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent phy
Bard, Samuel, 1742- Physician; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent phy
Bard, Samuel, 1742- Physician; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 hes. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent physician. He died May 24. 1821.
cian; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent physician. He died May 24. 1821.
cian; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent physician. He died May 24. 1821.
May 24th, 1821 AD (search for this): entry bard-samuel
cian; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent physician. He died May 24. 1821.
Bard, Samuel, 1742- Physician; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent phy
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