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New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): entry barlow-francis-channing
6 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896.
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry barlow-francis-channing
96 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896.
Brooklyn (New York, United States) (search for this): entry barlow-francis-channing
Barlow, Francis Channing, 1834-1896 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He d
6 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896.
Francis Channing Barlow (search for this): entry barlow-francis-channing
Barlow, Francis Channing, 1834-1896 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He di
Barlow, Francis Channing, 1834-1896 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He d
96 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896.
96 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896.
4-1896 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11,
96 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896.
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