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United States (United States) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
voys. (See Directory, the French.) Having made a large fortune by speculations in France, Mr. Barlow returned to the United States in 1805, and built himself an elegant mansion in the vicinity of Washington, and called his seat there Kalorama. In rt Fulton. and published in a quarto volume in a style more sumptuous than any book that had then been issued in the United States. It was an enlargement of his Vision of Columbus. In 1811 he commenced the preparation of a History of the United SUnited States, when President Madison appointed him minister plenipotentiary to the French Court. The next year he was invited to a conference with Napoleon at Wilna, for the nominal object of completing a commercial treaty with the United States. It was United States. It was believed by the war party that some arrangements would be made by which French ships, manned by Americans, might be employed against Great Britain. But such hopes were soon extinguished. Barlow set out from Paris immediately, and, as the call was
Westford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
1754; was graduated at Yale College in 1778; studied theology and was licensed a Congregational minister; and from 1778 to 1783 was a chaplain in the army, writing patriotic songs and addresses to keep up the spirits of the soldiers. When the army was disbanded (1783) he settled at Hartford, where he began to study law, and was admitted to the bar in 1785. He had tried book-selling; Joel Barlow. and, in 1792, he established a weekly newspaper, entitled the American mercury, published at Westford. His poetic talents becoming widely known, he was requested by several Congregational ministers to revise the phraseology of Watts's hymns. He also attempted to revise the Bible in the same way. A cousin of Benedict Arnold, who would talk in doggerel rhyme, was asked by Barlow to give him a specimen of his poetic talent. Arnold looked the poet sharply in the face, and said, instantly: You've proved yourself a sinful cretur, You've murdered Watts and spiled the metre, You've tried th
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
t had then been issued in the United States. It was an enlargement of his Vision of Columbus. In 1811 he commenced the preparation of a History of the United States, when President Madison appointed him minister plenipotentiary to the French Court. The next year he was invited to a conference with Napoleon at Wilna, for the nominal object of completing a commercial treaty with the United States. It was believed by the war party that some arrangements would be made by which French ships, manned by Americans, might be employed against Great Britain. But such hopes were soon extinguished. Barlow set out from Paris immediately, and, as the call was urgent, he travelled day and night, without rest. The fatigue and exposure brought on a disease of the lungs, and, in the cottage of a Polish Jew at Zarnowice, near Cracow, he suddenly expired, Dec. 24, 1812, from the effects of a violent congestion of the pulmonary organs. What the real object of Napoleon's call was may never be known.
Savoy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
of Columbus, a poem which obtained great popularity. Visiting Europe in 1788 as agent for the Scioto Land Company, he published, in aid of the French Revolution, Advice to the privileged orders. To this he added, in 1791, a Letter to the National convention, and the Conspiracy of Kings. As deputy of the London Constitutional Society, he presented an address to the French National Convention, and took up his abode in Paris, where he became a French citizen. Barlow was given employment in Savoy, where he wrote his mock-heroic poem, Hasty pudding. He was United States consul at Algiers in 1795-97, where he negotiated treaties with the ruler of that state, and also with the Bey of Tunis. He took sides with the French Directory in their controversy with the American envoys. (See Directory, the French.) Having made a large fortune by speculations in France, Mr. Barlow returned to the United States in 1805, and built himself an elegant mansion in the vicinity of Washington, and calle
Algiers (Algeria) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
the Scioto Land Company, he published, in aid of the French Revolution, Advice to the privileged orders. To this he added, in 1791, a Letter to the National convention, and the Conspiracy of Kings. As deputy of the London Constitutional Society, he presented an address to the French National Convention, and took up his abode in Paris, where he became a French citizen. Barlow was given employment in Savoy, where he wrote his mock-heroic poem, Hasty pudding. He was United States consul at Algiers in 1795-97, where he negotiated treaties with the ruler of that state, and also with the Bey of Tunis. He took sides with the French Directory in their controversy with the American envoys. (See Directory, the French.) Having made a large fortune by speculations in France, Mr. Barlow returned to the United States in 1805, and built himself an elegant mansion in the vicinity of Washington, and called his seat there Kalorama. In 1807 he published the Columbiad, an epic poem. It was illust
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
Barlow, Joel, 1754- Poet; born in Reading, Conn., March 24, 1754; was graduated at Yale College in 1778; studied theology and was licensed a Congregational minister; and from 1778 to 1783 was a chaplain in the army, writing patriotic songs and addresses to keep up the spirits of the soldiers. When the army was disbanded (1783) he settled at Hartford, where he began to study law, and was admitted to the bar in 1785. He had tried book-selling; Joel Barlow. and, in 1792, he established a weekly newspaper, entitled the American mercury, published at Westford. His poetic talents becoming widely known, he was requested by several Congregational ministers to revise the phraseology of Watts's hymns. He also attempted to revise the Bible in the same way. A cousin of Benedict Arnold, who would talk in doggerel rhyme, was asked by Barlow to give him a specimen of his poetic talent. Arnold looked the poet sharply in the face, and said, instantly: You've proved yourself a sinful cr
Kalorama (Victoria, Australia) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
is mock-heroic poem, Hasty pudding. He was United States consul at Algiers in 1795-97, where he negotiated treaties with the ruler of that state, and also with the Bey of Tunis. He took sides with the French Directory in their controversy with the American envoys. (See Directory, the French.) Having made a large fortune by speculations in France, Mr. Barlow returned to the United States in 1805, and built himself an elegant mansion in the vicinity of Washington, and called his seat there Kalorama. In 1807 he published the Columbiad, an epic poem. It was illustrated with engravings, some of them from designs by Robert Fulton. and published in a quarto volume in a style more sumptuous than any book that had then been issued in the United States. It was an enlargement of his Vision of Columbus. In 1811 he commenced the preparation of a History of the United States, when President Madison appointed him minister plenipotentiary to the French Court. The next year he was invited to a
as asked by Barlow to give him a specimen of his poetic talent. Arnold looked the poet sharply in the face, and said, instantly: You've proved yourself a sinful cretur, You've murdered Watts and spiled the metre, You've tried the Word of God to alter, And for your pains deserve a halter. With Trumbull, Dwight, Humphreys, and others, Barlow published a satirical poem entitled The Anarchiad. In 1787 he published his Vision of Columbus, a poem which obtained great popularity. Visiting Europe in 1788 as agent for the Scioto Land Company, he published, in aid of the French Revolution, Advice to the privileged orders. To this he added, in 1791, a Letter to the National convention, and the Conspiracy of Kings. As deputy of the London Constitutional Society, he presented an address to the French National Convention, and took up his abode in Paris, where he became a French citizen. Barlow was given employment in Savoy, where he wrote his mock-heroic poem, Hasty pudding. He was Uni
France (France) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
the French National Convention, and took up his abode in Paris, where he became a French citizen. Barlow was given employment in Savoy, where he wrote his mock-heroic poem, Hasty pudding. He was United States consul at Algiers in 1795-97, where he negotiated treaties with the ruler of that state, and also with the Bey of Tunis. He took sides with the French Directory in their controversy with the American envoys. (See Directory, the French.) Having made a large fortune by speculations in France, Mr. Barlow returned to the United States in 1805, and built himself an elegant mansion in the vicinity of Washington, and called his seat there Kalorama. In 1807 he published the Columbiad, an epic poem. It was illustrated with engravings, some of them from designs by Robert Fulton. and published in a quarto volume in a style more sumptuous than any book that had then been issued in the United States. It was an enlargement of his Vision of Columbus. In 1811 he commenced the preparation
Wilna (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry barlow-joel
Columbiad, an epic poem. It was illustrated with engravings, some of them from designs by Robert Fulton. and published in a quarto volume in a style more sumptuous than any book that had then been issued in the United States. It was an enlargement of his Vision of Columbus. In 1811 he commenced the preparation of a History of the United States, when President Madison appointed him minister plenipotentiary to the French Court. The next year he was invited to a conference with Napoleon at Wilna, for the nominal object of completing a commercial treaty with the United States. It was believed by the war party that some arrangements would be made by which French ships, manned by Americans, might be employed against Great Britain. But such hopes were soon extinguished. Barlow set out from Paris immediately, and, as the call was urgent, he travelled day and night, without rest. The fatigue and exposure brought on a disease of the lungs, and, in the cottage of a Polish Jew at Zarnowi
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