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Ontario (Canada) (search for this): entry canada
the Imperial Parliament, which received the royal assent March 28, 1867, the provinces of Upper and Lower Canada, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia were connected and made one nation, under the general title of The Dominion. Upper Canada was named Ontario, and Lower Canada Quebec. Provision was made for the future admission of Prince Edward Island, the Hudson Bay Territory, British Columbia, and Newfoundland, with its dependency, Labrador. In the new government the executive authority is vestedinistry, who must be sustained by a Parliamentary majority. There is a Parliament composed of two chambers, the Senate and the House of Commons. According to the census of 1891 the population of the Dominion, by provinces, was as follows: Ontario2,114,321 Quebec1,488,535 Nova Scotia450,396 New Brunswick321.263 Manitoba152,506 British Columbia98,173 Prince Edward Island109,078 Northwest Territories98,967 ———— Total4,833,239 Official statistics for the fiscal year ending June
Amherstburg (Canada) (search for this): entry canada
. The wives of three of his officers, with thirty soldiers to protect the schooner, also embarked in her. In a smaller vessel the invalids of the army were conveyed. Both vessels arrived at the site of Toledo on the evening of July 1. The next day, when near Frenchtown (afterwards Monroe), Hull received a note from the postmaster at Cleveland announcing the declaration of war. It was the first intimation he had received of that important event. In fact, the British at Fort Malden (now Amherstburg) heard of the declaration before Hull did, and captured his schooner, with all its precious freight. The commander at Malden had been informed of it, by express, as early as June 30—two days before it reached Hull. The latter pressed forward, and encamped near Detroit on July 5. The British were then casting up intrenchments at Sandwich on the opposite side of the Detroit River. There Hull awaited further orders from his government. His troops, impatient to invade Canada, had evinced
Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): entry canada
s. They welcomed invasion, but had not the courage to join the invaders. At the same time, the French peasantry did not obey the order of the Roman Catholic bishop, which was sent to the several parishes, and read by the local clergy, to come out in defence of the British government. It was known that the bishop was a stipendiary of the crown. There was a decided war spirit visible in the second Continental Congress, yet it was cautious and prudent. Immediately after the seizure of Ticonderoga and Crown Point (May 10-12, 1775), the Congress was urged to authorize the invasion and seizure of Canada. That body hoped to gain a greater victory by making the Canadians their friends and allies. To this end they sent a loving address to them, and resolved, on June 1, that no expedition or incursion ought to be undertaken or made by any colony or body of colonists against or into Canada. The Provincial Congress of New York had expressly disclaimed any intention to make war on Canada
Michigan Valley (Kansas, United States) (search for this): entry canada
. To enter the province from the States, a water-barrier had to be crossed, while the American frontier was destitute of roads, infected with summer fevers, and sparsely settled. William Hull, a soldier of the Revolution, then governor of Michigan Territory, was consulted about an invasion of Canada, while on a visit at Washington. He insisted that before such an enterprise should be undertaken a naval control of Lake Erie should be acquired, and not less than 3,000 troops should be provided ade upon the fort at Detroit. On Sunday morning, the 16th, the British crossed the river to a point below Detroit, and moved upon the fort. Very little effort was made to defend it, and, on that day, Hull surrendered the fort, army, and Territory of Michigan into the hands of the British. See Detroit; Hull, William. On Oct. 17, 1813, General Harrison, of the United States army, and Commodore Perry, commander of the fleet on Lake Erie, issued a proclamation, stating that, by the combined o
Lake Ontario (search for this): entry canada
struggle. Three armies were soon in motion towards Montreal, where Vaudreuil had gathered all his forces. Amherst, with 10,000 English and provincial troops, and 1,000 Indians of the Six Nations, led by Johnson, embarked at Oswego, went down Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence to Montreal, where he met Murray (Sept. 6), who had come up from Quebec with 4,000 men. The next day, Colonel Haviland arrived with 3,000 troops from Crown Point, having taken possession of Isle aux Noix on the way. Resistipal military forces in Upper Canada were under Lieutenant-General Drummond. When the Army of the North, commanded by Major-General Brown, reached the Niagara frontier, Drummond's headquarters were at Burlington Heights, at the western end of Lake Ontario. General Riall was on the Niagara River, at Fort George and Queenston; but when lie heard of the arrival of the Americans at Buffalo, under General Scott, he advanced to Chippewa and established a fortified camp. At the close of June, General
Niagara River (New York, United States) (search for this): entry canada
e under Lieutenant-General Drummond. When the Army of the North, commanded by Major-General Brown, reached the Niagara frontier, Drummond's headquarters were at Burlington Heights, at the western end of Lake Ontario. General Riall was on the Niagara River, at Fort George and Queenston; but when lie heard of the arrival of the Americans at Buffalo, under General Scott, he advanced to Chippewa and established a fortified camp. At the close of June, General Brown arrived at Buffalo, and assumed on the design, and warning them to beware of the penalties that must assuredly follow such infringement of international laws. In December, 1837, a party of sympathizing Americans took possession of Navy Island, belonging to Canada, in the Niagara River, about 2 miles above the falls. They mustered about 700 men, well provisioned, and provided with twenty pieces of cannon. They had a small steamboat named the Caroline to ply between the island and Schlosser, on the American side. On a dar
Vistula (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry canada
he navigable waters of the Maumee, his beasts of burden were so worn down by fatigue that he despatched for Detroit, in a schooner, his own baggage and that of most of his officers; also all of his hospital stores, intrenching tools, and a trunk containing, his most valuable military papers. The wives of three of his officers, with thirty soldiers to protect the schooner, also embarked in her. In a smaller vessel the invalids of the army were conveyed. Both vessels arrived at the site of Toledo on the evening of July 1. The next day, when near Frenchtown (afterwards Monroe), Hull received a note from the postmaster at Cleveland announcing the declaration of war. It was the first intimation he had received of that important event. In fact, the British at Fort Malden (now Amherstburg) heard of the declaration before Hull did, and captured his schooner, with all its precious freight. The commander at Malden had been informed of it, by express, as early as June 30—two days before it
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry canada
all of present British America, and more. At that time Hudson Bay and vicinity was restored to England by Louis XIV. Newfoundland and Acadia (Nova Scotia) were ceded to the English, and all right tolonel Allen had attempted to take Montreal, without orders, and was made a prisoner and sent to England. A detachment of Schuyler's army captured Fort Chambly, 12 miles from St. Johns, on the Sorel open insurrection in 1837-38. A movement for a separation of the Canadas from the crown of Great Britain, and their political independence, was begun simultaneously in Upper and Lower Canada in 183ive sympathy on the northern frontier, that peaceful relations between the United States and Great Britain were endangered. President Van Buren issued a proclamation, calling upon all persons engageCanada were united for purposes of government, the system professedly modified after that of Great Britain. In 1857 Ottawa was selected as the permanent seat of government for Canada, and costly pub
Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) (search for this): entry canada
uenot refugee, received a royal commission from King Charles I. to seize the French forts in Acadia (q. v.), and on the river St. Lawrence. With a dozen ships he overcame the small French force at Port Royal, and took possession of Acadia in 1629. Later in the summer he entered the St. Lawrence, burned the hamlet of Tadousac, at the mouth of the Saguenay, and sent a summons for the surrender of Quebec. It was refused, and Kirk resolved to starve out the garrison. He cruised in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and captured the transports conveying winter provisions for Quebec. The sufferings there were intense, but they endured them until August the next year, when, English ships-of-war, under a brother of Admiral Kirk, appearing before Quebec, instead of the expected supply-ships, the place was surrendered, and the inhabitants, not more than 100 in all, were saved from starvation. By a treaty, Canada was restored to the French in 1632. In the early history of the colony, the governor
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry canada
of conquest, and become too independent; so they authorized an expedition for the purpose after the old plan of attacking that province by land and sea. An English fleet was prepared to go against Quebec; a land force, composed of troops from Connecticut, New York, and colonies farther south, gathered at Albany, to march against Montreal. Governor Clinton assumed the chief command of the land expedition. His unpopularity thwarted his plans. The corporation of Albany refused to furnish quarteointed to the command of the Northern Department, which included the whole province of New York. Gen. Richard Montgomery was his chief lieutenant. The regiments raised by the province of New York were put in motion, and General Wooster, with Connecticut troops, who were stationed at Harlem, was ordered to Albany. The New-Yorkers were joined by Green Mountain boys. Schuyler sent into Canada an address to the inhabitants, in the French language, informing them that the only views of Congress
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