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Linden, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry chicago
an around his neck aid endeavored to get hold of his scalping-knife. While thus struggling, she was dragged from her antagonist by another Indian, who bore her to the shore of the lake and plunged her in, at the same time saving her from drowning. It was a friendly hand that held her —the Pottawatomie chief Black Partridge, who would have saved the white people if he could. He gave Captain Heald such warning as he dared. On the night before the evacuation of the fort he had said to him, Linden birds have been singing in my ears to-day; be careful on the march you are going to take. On that bloody field, now in the suburbs of the great city of Chicago, other women performed acts of heroism. Meanwhile, Captain Heald had made terms for surrender, and the massacre was stayed. The prisoners were distributed among the captors, and were finally reunited or restored to their friends and families. In this affair, twelve children, who were in a wagon, all the masculine civilians excep
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry chicago
Chicago, City, port of entry, commercial metropolis of Illinois, and second city in the United States in point of population according to the census of 1900.. It is not only the largest city on the Great Lakes, but is also the largest interior Chicago art Institute. city in the country. In 1900 it had an estimated area of 190 1/2 square miles. The equalized valuation of all taxable property in 1899 was $345,196,419, and the net debt was $14,529,042. The city owned real estate and buildings valued at $67,230,742, including a waterworks plant that cost $28,216,399. In the calendar year 1900, the foreign trade of the city was: Imports, $15,272,178; exports, $8,843,603. The population in 1890 was 1,099,850; in 1900 it had reached 1,698,575. Early history.—The site of Chicago was a favorite rendezvous for several tribes of Indians in summer. Its name signifies, in the Pottawatomie tongue, wild onion, or a polecat, both of which abounded in that region. Of the skin of the pole
Pottawatomie (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): entry chicago
g wives of both officers were in the fort. The garrison and the family of Mr. Kinzie, living near by, were on friendly terms with the surrounding Indians, until the spring of 1812, when the hostile feelings created by British emissaries first became slightly manifest. A scalping party of Winnebagoes made a raid on a settlement near Chicago in April, and during the early part of the ensuing summer the inhabitants saw, with alarm, the continual gathering of Indians. On Aug. 7, a friendly Pottawatomie chief arrived with a letter from General Hull, notifying Heald of the declaration of war and fall of Mackinaw, and advising him, if expe- Kinzie mansion and Fort Dearborn. dient, to evacuate the fort and distribute all the United States property there among the neighboring Indians. Heald was advised by this chief and by Kinzie to leave the fort and let the Indians distribute the property themselves. While they are doing this, they said, you and the white people may reach Fort Wayne i
Fort Wayne (Indiana, United States) (search for this): entry chicago
nd by Kinzie to leave the fort and let the Indians distribute the property themselves. While they are doing this, they said, you and the white people may reach Fort Wayne in safety. Heald, soldier-like, resolved to obey his orders. He called them to a council the next day (Aug. 12), told them to come and receive the property, and accepted their offer to escort the white people through the wilderness to Fort Wayne. It was a fatal mistake, soon perceived. Black Partridge, a friendly chief, unable to control his warriors, came quietly to the commander, and said, Father, I come to deliver to you the medal I wear. It was given me by the Americans, and private soldiers were murdered. On the following day the fort was burned by the Indians. Among the slain was Captain Wells, Mrs. Heald's uncle, who came from Fort Wayne with some mounted Miamis who were friendly. He knew the danger, and had hastened to attempt to divert it. He was too late, for the fort was abandoned when he
United States (United States) (search for this): entry chicago
Chicago, City, port of entry, commercial metropolis of Illinois, and second city in the United States in point of population according to the census of 1900.. It is not only the largest city on the Great Lakes, but is also the largest interior Chicago art Institute. city in the country. In 1900 it had an estimated area of 190 1/2 square miles. The equalized valuation of all taxable property in 1899 was $345,196,419, and the net debt was $14,529,042. The city owned real estate and builddly Pottawatomie chief arrived with a letter from General Hull, notifying Heald of the declaration of war and fall of Mackinaw, and advising him, if expe- Kinzie mansion and Fort Dearborn. dient, to evacuate the fort and distribute all the United States property there among the neighboring Indians. Heald was advised by this chief and by Kinzie to leave the fort and let the Indians distribute the property themselves. While they are doing this, they said, you and the white people may reach F
Canada (Canada) (search for this): entry chicago
5. Early history.—The site of Chicago was a favorite rendezvous for several tribes of Indians in summer. Its name signifies, in the Pottawatomie tongue, wild onion, or a polecat, both of which abounded in that region. Of the skin of the polecat the Indians made tobacco-pouches. The spot was first visited by Marquette, a French Jesuit missionary, in 1673, who encamped there in the winter of 1674-75. The French built a fort there, which is marked on a map, in 1683, Fort Checagou. When Canada was ceded to Great Britain this fort was abandoned. The United States government built a fort there in 1804, and named it Dearborn, in honor of the Secretary of War. It was on the south side of the Chicago River, near its mouth. In the War of 1812-15. This fort was evacuated by its garrison in 1812, when the troops and other white inhabitants there were fallen upon by hostile Indians and many people murdered—Aug. 15. The garrison of the fort was commanded by Capt. N. Heald, assisted
Chicago River (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry chicago
hat region. Of the skin of the polecat the Indians made tobacco-pouches. The spot was first visited by Marquette, a French Jesuit missionary, in 1673, who encamped there in the winter of 1674-75. The French built a fort there, which is marked on a map, in 1683, Fort Checagou. When Canada was ceded to Great Britain this fort was abandoned. The United States government built a fort there in 1804, and named it Dearborn, in honor of the Secretary of War. It was on the south side of the Chicago River, near its mouth. In the War of 1812-15. This fort was evacuated by its garrison in 1812, when the troops and other white inhabitants there were fallen upon by hostile Indians and many people murdered—Aug. 15. The garrison of the fort was commanded by Capt. N. Heald, assisted by Lieutenant Helm. The young wives of both officers were in the fort. The garrison and the family of Mr. Kinzie, living near by, were on friendly terms with the surrounding Indians, until the spring of 1812
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry chicago
Chicago, City, port of entry, commercial metropolis of Illinois, and second city in the United States in point of popula00 it had reached 1,698,575. Early history.—The site of Chicago was a favorite rendezvous for several tribes of Indians inping party of Winnebagoes made a raid on a settlement near Chicago in April, and during the early part of the ensuing summer kinaw, and advising him, if expe- Kinzie mansion and Fort Dearborn. dient, to evacuate the fort and distribute all the Uniy. This warning was strangely unheeded. Massacre at Fort Dearborn. The less honorable Indians promised good conduct, bept her saddle; and when a fierce The last vestige of Fort Dearborn. savage raised his tomahawk to slay her, she said, in athat bloody field, now in the suburbs of the great city of Chicago, other women performed acts of heroism. Meanwhile, Captaimprised twelve families, besides the little garrison of Fort Dearborn. The town was organized in 1833, with five trustees, w
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry chicago
site of Chicago was a favorite rendezvous for several tribes of Indians in summer. Its name signifies, in the Pottawatomie tongue, wild onion, or a polecat, both of which abounded in that region. Of the skin of the polecat the Indians made tobacco-pouches. The spot was first visited by Marquette, a French Jesuit missionary, in 1673, who encamped there in the winter of 1674-75. The French built a fort there, which is marked on a map, in 1683, Fort Checagou. When Canada was ceded to Great Britain this fort was abandoned. The United States government built a fort there in 1804, and named it Dearborn, in honor of the Secretary of War. It was on the south side of the Chicago River, near its mouth. In the War of 1812-15. This fort was evacuated by its garrison in 1812, when the troops and other white inhabitants there were fallen upon by hostile Indians and many people murdered—Aug. 15. The garrison of the fort was commanded by Capt. N. Heald, assisted by Lieutenant Helm. T
Dearborn (Michigan, United States) (search for this): entry chicago
the Pottawatomie tongue, wild onion, or a polecat, both of which abounded in that region. Of the skin of the polecat the Indians made tobacco-pouches. The spot was first visited by Marquette, a French Jesuit missionary, in 1673, who encamped there in the winter of 1674-75. The French built a fort there, which is marked on a map, in 1683, Fort Checagou. When Canada was ceded to Great Britain this fort was abandoned. The United States government built a fort there in 1804, and named it Dearborn, in honor of the Secretary of War. It was on the south side of the Chicago River, near its mouth. In the War of 1812-15. This fort was evacuated by its garrison in 1812, when the troops and other white inhabitants there were fallen upon by hostile Indians and many people murdered—Aug. 15. The garrison of the fort was commanded by Capt. N. Heald, assisted by Lieutenant Helm. The young wives of both officers were in the fort. The garrison and the family of Mr. Kinzie, living near by
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