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Ohio (United States) (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
Chickasaw Indians, A tribe of the Creek confederacy that formerly inhabited the country along the Mississippi from the borders of the Choctaw domain to the Ohio River, and eastward beyond the Tennessee to the lands of the Cherokees Battle of Chickasaw Bayou. and Shawnees. They were warlike, and were the early friends of the English and the inveterate foes of the French, who twice (1736 and 1740) invaded their country under Bienville and De Noailles. The Chickasaws said they came from west of the Mississippi, under the guardianship of a great dog, with a pole for a guide. At night they stuck the pole in the ground, and went the way it leaned every morning. Their dog was drowned in crossing the Mississippi, and after a while their pole, in the interior of Alabama, remained upright, and there they settled. De Soto passed a winter among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with the
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with the new-comers and surrounding tribes occurred until the middle of the eighteenth century. They favored the English in the Revolution, when they had about 1,000 warriors. They joined the white people against the Creeks in 1795, and always remained the friends of the pale faces; and, in 1818, they had ceded all their lands north of the State of Mississippi. Some of the tribe had already emigrated to Arkansas. In 1834 they ceded all their lands to the United States, amounting to over 6,400,000 acres, for which they received $3,646,000. Then they joined the Choctaws, who spoke the same language, and became a part of that nation. During their emigration the small-pox destroyed a large number of their tribe. They did not advance in civilization as rapidly as the Choctaws, and had no schools until 1851. They were politically separated from the Choctaws in 1855, and have since been recognized a
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
They were warlike, and were the early friends of the English and the inveterate foes of the French, who twice (1736 and 1740) invaded their country under Bienville and De Noailles. The Chickasaws said they came from west of the Mississippi, under the guardianship of a great dog, with a pole for a guide. At night they stuck the pole in the ground, and went the way it leaned every morning. Their dog was drowned in crossing the Mississippi, and after a while their pole, in the interior of Alabama, remained upright, and there they settled. De Soto passed a winter among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with the new-comers and surrounding tribes occurred until the middle of the eighteenth century. They favored the English in the Revolution, when they had about 1,000 warriors. They joined the white people against the Creeks in 1795, and always remained the friends of the pale faces
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
said they came from west of the Mississippi, under the guardianship of a great dog, with a pole for a guide. At night they stuck the pole in the ground, and went the way it leaned every morning. Their dog was drowned in crossing the Mississippi, and after a while their pole, in the interior of Alabama, remained upright, and there they settled. De Soto passed a winter among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with the new-comers and surrounding tribes occurred until the middle of the eighteenth century. They favored the English in the Revolution, when they had about 1,000 warriors. They joined the white people against the Creeks in 1795, and always remained the friends of the pale faces; and, in 1818, they had ceded all their lands north of the State of Mississippi. Some of the tribe had already emigrated to Arkansas. In 1834 they ceded all their lands to the United States, amoun
Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
l their lands to the United States, amounting to over 6,400,000 acres, for which they received $3,646,000. Then they joined the Choctaws, who spoke the same language, and became a part of that nation. During their emigration the small-pox destroyed a large number of their tribe. They did not advance in civilization as rapidly as the Choctaws, and had no schools until 1851. They were politically separated from the Choctaws in 1855, and have since been recognized as a distinct tribe. Led by their agents, who were Southern men, they joined the Confederates, and lost nearly one-fourth of their population, much stock, and all their slaves. They gave up 7,000,000 acres of land for 4 1/2 cents an acre, and the money was to go to the freedmen, unless within two years they allowed the negroes to become a part of the tribe. The latter alternative was adopted, Jan. 10, 1873. In 1899 there were 8,730 still bearing their old name at the Union agency, Indian Territory. See Choctaw Indians.
United States (United States) (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
elves in Louisiana. Wars with the new-comers and surrounding tribes occurred until the middle of the eighteenth century. They favored the English in the Revolution, when they had about 1,000 warriors. They joined the white people against the Creeks in 1795, and always remained the friends of the pale faces; and, in 1818, they had ceded all their lands north of the State of Mississippi. Some of the tribe had already emigrated to Arkansas. In 1834 they ceded all their lands to the United States, amounting to over 6,400,000 acres, for which they received $3,646,000. Then they joined the Choctaws, who spoke the same language, and became a part of that nation. During their emigration the small-pox destroyed a large number of their tribe. They did not advance in civilization as rapidly as the Choctaws, and had no schools until 1851. They were politically separated from the Choctaws in 1855, and have since been recognized as a distinct tribe. Led by their agents, who were Sout
De Soto, Jefferson County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
he English and the inveterate foes of the French, who twice (1736 and 1740) invaded their country under Bienville and De Noailles. The Chickasaws said they came from west of the Mississippi, under the guardianship of a great dog, with a pole for a guide. At night they stuck the pole in the ground, and went the way it leaned every morning. Their dog was drowned in crossing the Mississippi, and after a while their pole, in the interior of Alabama, remained upright, and there they settled. De Soto passed a winter among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with the new-comers and surrounding tribes occurred until the middle of the eighteenth century. They favored the English in the Revolution, when they had about 1,000 warriors. They joined the white people against the Creeks in 1795, and always remained the friends of the pale faces; and, in 1818, they had ceded all their lands north
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
er among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with the new-comers and surrounding tribes occurred until the middle of the eighteenth century. They favored the English in the Revolution, when they had about 1,000 warriors. They joined the white people against the Creeks in 1795, and always remained the friends of the pale faces; and, in 1818, they had ceded all their lands north of the State of Mississippi. Some of the tribe had already emigrated to Arkansas. In 1834 they ceded all their lands to the United States, amounting to over 6,400,000 acres, for which they received $3,646,000. Then they joined the Choctaws, who spoke the same language, and became a part of that nation. During their emigration the small-pox destroyed a large number of their tribe. They did not advance in civilization as rapidly as the Choctaws, and had no schools until 1851. They were politically separated
Chickasaw Indians, A tribe of the Creek confederacy that formerly inhabited the country along the Mississippi from the borders of the Choctaw domain to the Ohio River, and eastward beyond the Tennessee to the lands of the Cherokees Battle of Chickasaw Bayou. and Shawnees. They were warlike, and were the early friends of the English and the inveterate foes of the French, who twice (1736 and 1740) invaded their country under Bienville and De Noailles. The Chickasaws said they came from west of the Mississippi, under the guardianship of a great dog, with a pole for a guide. At night they stuck the pole in the ground, and went the way it leaned every morning. Their dog was drowned in crossing the Mississippi, and after a while their pole, in the interior of Alabama, remained upright, and there they settled. De Soto passed a winter among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with th
Jean Baptiste le moyne Bienville (search for this): entry chickasaw-indians
Chickasaw Indians, A tribe of the Creek confederacy that formerly inhabited the country along the Mississippi from the borders of the Choctaw domain to the Ohio River, and eastward beyond the Tennessee to the lands of the Cherokees Battle of Chickasaw Bayou. and Shawnees. They were warlike, and were the early friends of the English and the inveterate foes of the French, who twice (1736 and 1740) invaded their country under Bienville and De Noailles. The Chickasaws said they came from west of the Mississippi, under the guardianship of a great dog, with a pole for a guide. At night they stuck the pole in the ground, and went the way it leaned every morning. Their dog was drowned in crossing the Mississippi, and after a while their pole, in the interior of Alabama, remained upright, and there they settled. De Soto passed a winter among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with th
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