hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 19 total hits in 14 results.

1 2
ns. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the prairies; The village blacksmith; The unwilling laborer, and The repose. He illustrated several of Dickens's works, and during the Civil War delineated many characteristic scenes. Some of the more elaborate pictures on the United States government bonds were made by him; and also the beautiful design of the certificate of stock given as evidence of subscription for the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Among his later works in book illustrations were 500 beautiful designs for Lossing's Our country. Mr. Darley went to Europe near the close of the war, studied models in Rome, and returned with a portfolio full of personal sketches. He died in Claymont, Del., March 27, 1888.
Claymont, Del. (Delaware, United States) (search for this): entry darley-felix-octavius-carr
ns. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the prairies; The village blacksmith; The unwilling laborer, and The repose. He illustrated several of Dickens's works, and during the Civil War delineated many characteristic scenes. Some of the more elaborate pictures on the United States government bonds were made by him; and also the beautiful design of the certificate of stock given as evidence of subscription for the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Among his later works in book illustrations were 500 beautiful designs for Lossing's Our country. Mr. Darley went to Europe near the close of the war, studied models in Rome, and returned with a portfolio full of personal sketches. He died in Claymont, Del., March 27, 1888.
ter; born in Philadelphia June 23, 1822; evinced a taste for drawing at an early age, and while a lad in a mercantile house spent his leisure time in sketching. For some of these he was offered a handsome sum, and this induced him to choose art as a life pursuit. He spent several years in Philadelphia, always living by his pencil, and in 1848 he went to New York, where he made admirable illustrations for some of Irving's humorous works. Among these were The legend of Sleepy hollow and Rip Van Winkle. These works procured for him the reputation, at home and abroad, as a leader in the art of outline illustrations. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the prairies; The village blacksmith; The unwilling laborer, and Th
Felix Octavius Carr Darley (search for this): entry darley-felix-octavius-carr
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888 Designer and painter; born in Philadelphia June 23, 1822; evinced a taste for drawing at an early age, and while a lad in a mercantile house spent his leisure time in sketching. For some of these he was offered a handsome sum, and this induced him to choose art as a life pursuit. He spent several years in Philadelphia, always living by his pencil, and in 1848 he went to New York, where he made admirable illustrations for some of Irving's humorous worome of the more elaborate pictures on the United States government bonds were made by him; and also the beautiful design of the certificate of stock given as evidence of subscription for the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Among his later works in book illustrations were 500 beautiful designs for Lossing's Our country. Mr. Darley went to Europe near the close of the war, studied models in Rome, and returned with a portfolio full of personal sketches. He died in Claymont, Del., March 27, 1888.
induced him to choose art as a life pursuit. He spent several years in Philadelphia, always living by his pencil, and in 1848 he went to New York, where he made admirable illustrations for some of Irving's humorous works. Among these were The legend of Sleepy hollow and Rip Van Winkle. These works procured for him the reputation, at home and abroad, as a leader in the art of outline illustrations. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the prairies; The village blacksmith; The unwilling laborer, and The repose. He illustrated several of Dickens's works, and during the Civil War delineated many characteristic scenes. Some of the more elaborate pictures on the United States government bonds were made by him; and al
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888 Designer and painter; born in Philadelphia June 23, 1822; evinced a taste for drawing at an early age, and while a lad in a mercantile house spent his leisure time in sketching. For some of these he was offered a handsome sum, and this induced him to choose art as a life pursuit. He spent several years in Philadelphia, always living by his pencil, and in 1848 he went to New York, where he made admirable illustrations for some of Irving's humorous works. Among these were The legend of Sleepy hollow and Rip Van Winkle. These works procured for him the reputation, at home and abroad, as a leader in the art of outline illustrations. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the pr
e reputation, at home and abroad, as a leader in the art of outline illustrations. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the prairies; The village blacksmith; The unwilling laborer, and The repose. He illustrated several of Dickens's works, and during the Civil War delineated many characteristic scenes. Some of the more elaborate pictures on the United States government bonds were made by him; and also the beautiful design of the certificate of stock given as evidence of subscription for the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Among his later works in book illustrations were 500 beautiful designs for Lossing's Our country. Mr. Darley went to Europe near the close of the war, studied models in Rome, and returned with a
s. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the prairies; The village blacksmith; The unwilling laborer, and The repose. He illustrated several of Dickens's works, and during the Civil War delineated many characteristic scenes. Some of the more elaborate pictures on the United States government bonds were made by him; and also the beautiful design of the certificate of stock given as evidence of subscription for the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Among his later works in book illustrations were 500 beautiful designs for Lossing's Our country. Mr. Darley went to Europe near the close of the war, studied models in Rome, and returned with a portfolio full of personal sketches. He died in Claymont, Del., March 27, 1888.
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888 Designer and painter; born in Philadelphia June 23, 1822; evinced a taste for drawing at an early age, and while a lad in a mercantile house spent his leisure time in sketching. For some of these he was offered a handsome sum, and this induced him to choose art as a life pursuit. He spent several years in Philadelphia, always living by his pencil, and in 1848 he went to New York, where he made admirable illustrations for some of Irving's humorous works. Among these were The legend of Sleepy hollow and Rip Van Winkle. These works procured for him the reputation, at home and abroad, as a leader in the art of outline illustrations. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the pr
ns. He illustrated a great many books and made numerous admirable designs for bank-notes. For Cooper's works he made 500 illustrations. More than sixty of them were engraved on steel. He executed four large works ordered by Prince Napoleon while in this country. These were: Emigrants attacked by Indians on the prairies; The village blacksmith; The unwilling laborer, and The repose. He illustrated several of Dickens's works, and during the Civil War delineated many characteristic scenes. Some of the more elaborate pictures on the United States government bonds were made by him; and also the beautiful design of the certificate of stock given as evidence of subscription for the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Among his later works in book illustrations were 500 beautiful designs for Lossing's Our country. Mr. Darley went to Europe near the close of the war, studied models in Rome, and returned with a portfolio full of personal sketches. He died in Claymont, Del., March 27, 1888.
1 2