hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 96 total hits in 21 results.

1 2 3
on for the space of six weeks at the expense of the inhabitants, and obliging them (to be free from Spanish violence) to furnish the sum of four hundred thousand florins for the payment of the troops. After which the said troops, made more insolent by the connivance of their commanders, proceeded to open violence, endeavoring first to surprise the city of Brussels, the prince's usual residence, to be the magazine of their plunder; but, not succeeding in that, they took by force the town of Alost, and after that surprised and forced Maestricht, and soon after the said city of Antwerp, which they plundered and burnt, and massacred the inhabitants in a most barbarous manner, to the irreparable loss not only of the citizens, but to all nations who had any effects there. And notwithstanding the said Spaniards had been, by the council of state (upon which the King, after the decease of the great commander, had conferred the government of the country) in the presence of Jeronimo de Rhoda,
Declaration of Independence, Dutch. The following is the text of the declaration of the States General of the United Provinces, settingspoused the liberty of their country. Soon after the provinces of Holland and Zealand for the most part revolted, putting themselves under te aforesaid Prince of Orange, in conjunction with the provinces of Holland and Zealand, which agreement was approved by the said council of saining them over to his party, he might by their assistance reduce Holland and Zealand, after which the other provinces would be easily subdum in making war against the Prince of Orange, and the provinces of Holland and Zealand, more cruel and bloody than any war before. But, as nd act in that capacity, they shall act in our name, except that in Holland and Zealand where they shall use the name of the Prince of Orange, county of Zutphen, to the president and members of the council of Holland, to the receivers of great officers of Beoosterscheldt and Beweste
rds, under pretence of mutiny, to enter the city of Antwerp forcibly, in the sight of the great commander, and to live there at discretion for the space of six weeks at the expense of the inhabitants, and obliging them (to be free from Spanish violence) to furnish the sum of four hundred thousand florins for the payment of the troops. After which the said troops, made more insolent by the connivance of their commanders, proceeded to open violence, endeavoring first to surprise the city of Brussels, the prince's usual residence, to be the magazine of their plunder; but, not succeeding in that, they took by force the town of Alost, and after that surprised and forced Maestricht, and soon after the said city of Antwerp, which they plundered and burnt, and massacred the inhabitants in a most barbarous manner, to the irreparable loss not only of the citizens, but to all nations who had any effects there. And notwithstanding the said Spaniards had been, by the council of state (upon which
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry declaration-of-independence-dutch
by all of them united, which he had effected, had it not been for the Prince of Orange with diverse gentlemen and other inhabitants, who had followed this prince in hhe most part revolted, putting themselves under the protection of the Prince of Orange, against which provinces the said duke during his government, and the great come occasion to the States at the same time to agree with the aforesaid Prince of Orange, in conjunction with the provinces of Holland and Zealand, which agreement was to force those who would not join with him in making war against the Prince of Orange, and the provinces of Holland and Zealand, more cruel and bloody than any war bus to despair, offering a great sum to any that would assassinate the Prince of Orange. So, having no hope of reconciliation, and finding no other remedy, we have, acept that in Holland and Zealand where they shall use the name of the Prince of Orange, and of the States of the said provinces till the aforesaid council shall legal
Antwerp, Paulding County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry declaration-of-independence-dutch
reduced under the Spanish yoke, both with their lives and fortunes to conquer them, shewing no more mercy to those they employ to assist them than if they had been enemies, permitting the Spaniards, under pretence of mutiny, to enter the city of Antwerp forcibly, in the sight of the great commander, and to live there at discretion for the space of six weeks at the expense of the inhabitants, and obliging them (to be free from Spanish violence) to furnish the sum of four hundred thousand florins surprise the city of Brussels, the prince's usual residence, to be the magazine of their plunder; but, not succeeding in that, they took by force the town of Alost, and after that surprised and forced Maestricht, and soon after the said city of Antwerp, which they plundered and burnt, and massacred the inhabitants in a most barbarous manner, to the irreparable loss not only of the citizens, but to all nations who had any effects there. And notwithstanding the said Spaniards had been, by the c
Declaration of Independence, Dutch. The following is the text of the declaration of the States General of the United Provinces, setting forth that Philip II. had forfeited his right of sovereignty over the said provinces, promulgated at The Hague, July 26, 1581: The States General of the United Provinces of the Low Countries, to all whom it may concern, do by these Presents send greeting: As 'tis apparent to all that a prince is constituted by God to be ruler of a people, to defend thour said ordinance to be observed inviolably, punishing the offenders impartially and without delay; for so 'tis found expedient for the public good. And, for better maintaining all and every article hereof, we give to all and every of you, by express command, full power and authority. In witness wherof we have hereunto set our hands and seals, dated in our assembly at the Hague, the six and twentieth day of July, 1581, indorsed by the orders of the States General, and signed J. De Asseliers.
nces. And, although the said disturbances, which in the year 1566 happened on the fore-mentioned occasion, were now appeased by the governess and her ministers, and many friends to liberty were either banished or subdued, in so much that the King had not any shew of reason to use arms and violences, and further oppress this country, yet for these causes and reasons, long time before sought by the council of Spain (as appears by intercepted letters from the Spanish ambassador, Alana, then in France, writ to the Duchess of Parma), to annul all the privileges of this country, and govern it tyrannically at pleasure as in the Indies; and in their new conquests he has, at the instigation of the council of Spain (shewing the little regard he had for his people, so contrary to the duty which a good prince owes to his subjects), sent the Duke of Alva with a powerful army to oppress this land, who for his inhumane cruelties is looked upon as one of its greatest enemies, accompanied with counse
e many remonstrances made to the King both by the provinces and particular towns, in writing as well as by some principal lords by word of mouth; and, namely, by the Baron of Montigny and Earl of Egmont, who with the approbation of the Duchess of Parma, then governess of the Low Countries, by the advice of the council of State were sent several times to Spain upon this affair. And, although the King had by fair words given them grounds to hope that their request should be complied with, yet by arms and violences, and further oppress this country, yet for these causes and reasons, long time before sought by the council of Spain (as appears by intercepted letters from the Spanish ambassador, Alana, then in France, writ to the Duchess of Parma), to annul all the privileges of this country, and govern it tyrannically at pleasure as in the Indies; and in their new conquests he has, at the instigation of the council of Spain (shewing the little regard he had for his people, so contrary to
leges of this country or of other the like maladministration. We further command the president and members of the privy council, chancellor of the Duchy of Brabant, also the chancellor of the Duchy of Gueldres, and county of Zutphen, to the president and members of the council of Holland, to the receivers of great officers of Beoosterscheldt and Bewesterscheldt in Zealand, to the president and council of Frise, and to the Escoulet of Mechelen, to the president and members of the council of Utrecht, and to all other justiciaries and officers whom it may concern, to the lieutenants all and every of them, to cause this our ordinance to be published and proclaimed throughout their respective jurisdictions, in the usual places appointed for that purpose, that none may plead ignorance. And to cause our said ordinance to be observed inviolably, punishing the offenders impartially and without delay; for so 'tis found expedient for the public good. And, for better maintaining all and every
ind his subjects, he sent at the same time Don John, his natural brother, as of his blood, to govern these countries, who under pretence of approving the treaty of Ghent confirming the promise made to the States of driving out the Spaniards, of punishing the authors of the disturbances, of settling the public peace, and of re-establd be easily subdued. Whereupon Don John, notwithstanding his solemn promise and oath, in the presence of all the aforesaid States, to observe the pacification of Ghent, and other articles stipulated between him and the States of all the provinces, on the contrary sought, by all possible promises made to the colonels already at hibly by their own governors. Having also, after the decease of Don John, sufficiently declared by the Baron de Selles that he would not allow the pacification of Ghent, the which Don John had in his majesty's name sworn to maintain, but daily proposing new terms of agreement less advantageous. Notwithstanding these discouragemen
1 2 3