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Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry dudley-joseph
Dudley, Joseph, 1647- Colonial governor; born in Roxbury, Mass., July 23, 1647; graduated at Harvard in 1665; prepared for the ministry, but, preferring politics, became a representative in the general court and a magistrate. From 1677 to 1681 he was one of the commissioners for the united colonies of New England. He was in the battle with the Narragansets in 1675, and was one of the commissioners who dictated the terms of a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commisief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal governors and the people, which continued about seventy years, were begun in Massachusetts with Dudley. In his first speech he demanded a fit and convenient house for the governor
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry dudley-joseph
with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal governors and the people, which continued about seventy years, were begun in Massachusetts with Dudley. In his first speech he deMassachusetts with Dudley. In his first speech he demanded a fit and convenient house for the governor, and a settled and stated salary for him. The House, in their answer the next day, observed that they would proceed to the consideration of these propositions with all convenient speed. They resolved to present, out of the public treasury, the sum of £500, and said, as to settling a salary for the governor, it is altogether new to us, nor can we think it agreeable to our present constitution, but we shall be ready to do, according to our abili
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry dudley-joseph
1675, and was one of the commissioners who dictated the terms of a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commissioned him president of New England, and in 1687 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court. Dudley was sent to England with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of MaEngland in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal governors and the people, which continued about seventy years, were begun in Massachusetts with Dudley. In his first speech he demanded a fit and convenient house for the governor, and a settled and stated salary for him. The House, in their answer the next day, observed that they would proceed to the consideration of these propositions with all convenient speed. They re
New England (United States) (search for this): entry dudley-joseph
., July 23, 1647; graduated at Harvard in 1665; prepared for the ministry, but, preferring politics, became a representative in the general court and a magistrate. From 1677 to 1681 he was one of the commissioners for the united colonies of New England. He was in the battle with the Narragansets in 1675, and was one of the commissioners who dictated the terms of a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commissioned him president of New England, and in 1687 he was made chiefNew England, and in 1687 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court. Dudley was sent to England with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal governors and the people, which continued about seventy years, were beg
inistry, but, preferring politics, became a representative in the general court and a magistrate. From 1677 to 1681 he was one of the commissioners for the united colonies of New England. He was in the battle with the Narragansets in 1675, and was one of the commissioners who dictated the terms of a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commissioned him president of New England, and in 1687 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court. Dudley was sent to England with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal governors and the people, which continued about seventy years, were begun in Massachusetts with Dudley. In his first speech he demanded a
Dudley, Joseph, 1647- Colonial governor; born in Roxbury, Mass., July 23, 1647; graduated at Harvard in 1665; prepared for the ministry, but, preferring politics, became a representative in the general court and a magistrate. From 1677 to 1681 he was one of the commissioners for the united colonies of New England. He was in the battle with the Narragansets in 1675, and was one of the commissioners who dictated the terms of a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commissioned him president of New England, and in 1687 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court. Dudley was sent to England with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal govern
Dudley, Joseph, 1647- Colonial governor; born in Roxbury, Mass., July 23, 1647; graduated at Harvard in 1665; prepared for the ministry, but, preferring politics, became a representative in the general court and a magistrate. From 1677 to 1681 he was one of the commissioners for the united colonies of New England. He was i a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commissioned him president of New England, and in 1687 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court. Dudley was sent to England with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle ofy, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal governors and the people, which continued about seventy years, were begun in Massachusetts with Dudley. In his first speech he demanded a fit and convenient house for the governor, and a settled and stated salary for him. The House, in their answer the next day, o
Dudley, Joseph, 1647- Colonial governor; born in Roxbury, Mass., July 23, 1647; graduated at Harvard in 1665; prepared for the ministry, but, preferring politics, became a representative in the general court and a magistrate. From 1677 to 1681 he was one of the commissioners for the united colonies of New England. He was in the battle with the Narragansets in 1675, and was one of the commissioners who dictated the terms of a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commissioned him president of New England, and in 1687 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court. Dudley was sent to England with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal govern
Dudley, Joseph, 1647- Colonial governor; born in Roxbury, Mass., July 23, 1647; graduated at Harvard in 1665; prepared for the ministry, but, preferring politics, became a representative in the general court and a magistrate. From 1677 to 1681 he was one of the commissioners for the united colonies of New England. He was in the battle with the Narragansets in 1675, and was one of the commissioners who dictated the terms of a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commissioned him president of New England, and in 1687 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court. Dudley was sent to England with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal govern
Dudley, Joseph, 1647- Colonial governor; born in Roxbury, Mass., July 23, 1647; graduated at Harvard in 1665; prepared for the ministry, but, preferring politics, became a representative in the general court and a magistrate. From 1677 to 1681 he was one of the commissioners for the united colonies of New England. He was in the battle with the Narragansets in 1675, and was one of the commissioners who dictated the terms of a treaty with that tribe. In September, 1685, King James commissioned him president of New England, and in 1687 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court. Dudley was sent to England with Andros in 1689, and the next year was made chief-justice of New York. He went to England in 1693, and was deputy governor of the Isle of Wight. He entered Parliament in 1701, and from 1702 to 1715 he was captain-general and governor of Massachusetts. Then he retired to his quiet home at Roxbury, where he died, April 2, 1720. The disputes between the royal govern
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