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South River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
incoln therefore issued a special order, Sept. 11, 1861, declaring that the emancipation clause of General Fremont's proclamation be so modified, held, and construed as to conform with and not to transcend the provisions on the same subject contained in the act of Congress approved Aug. 6, preceding. Another instance of the kind occurred at the hands of General Hunter, the following year. That officer, being in command at Hilton Head, N. C., proclaimed the States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, in his department, under martial law, and May 9, 1862, issued an order in which occurred these words: Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these States—Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina—heretofore held as slaves are therefore declared forever free. Though President Lincoln had been bitterly censured by extremists for his action towards General Fremont, and though he knew that to interfere with General Hunter would only bring u
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
s and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Maras111,104 Alabama435,132 Florida61,753 Georgia462,232 Mississippi436,696 North Carolina275,081 South Carolina402,541 Texas180,682 Virginia (part)450,437 Louisiana (part)247,734 The pen with which President Lincoln wrote his emancipation proclamation. The institution was not disturbed by the proclamation in eight States, which contained 831,780 slaves, distributed as follows: Delaware1,798 Kentucky225,490 Maryland87,188 Missouri114,465 Tennessee275,784 Louisiana (part)85,281 West Virginia12,761 Virginia (part)29,013 The remainder were emancipated by the Thirteenth Amendment to the national Constitution, making the whole number set free
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
gton, in a common cedar holder—all as plain and unostentatious as was the President himself. By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State. By the Emancipation Proclamation 3,063,392 slaves were set free, as follows: Arkansas111,104 Alabama435,132 Florida61,753 Georgia462,232 Mississippi436,696 North Carolina275,081 South Carolina402,541 Texas180,682 Virginia (part)450,437 Louisiana (part)247,734 The pen with which President Lincoln wrote his emancipation proclamation. The institution was not disturbed by the proclamation in eight States, which contained 831,780 slaves, distributed as follows: Delaware1,798 Kentucky225,490 Maryland87,188 Missouri114,465 Tennessee275,784 Louisiana (part)85,281 West Virginia12,761 Virginia (part)29,013 The remainder were emancipated by the Thirteenth Amendment to the national Constitution, making the whole number set free 3,895,172. On the preceding pages is given a facsimile of the Proclamation of Emancipatio
Saint Martin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
n proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the power and for t
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
f the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabamam H. Seward, Secretary of State. By the Emancipation Proclamation 3,063,392 slaves were set free, as follows: Arkansas111,104 Alabama435,132 Florida61,753 Georgia462,232 Mississippi436,696 North Carolina275,081 South Carolina402,541 Texas180,682 Virginia (part)450,437 Louisiana (part)247,734 The pen with which President Lincoln wrote his emancipation proclamation. The institution was not disturbed by the proclamation in eight States, which contained 831,780 slaves, distribut
Orleans, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the power and for the purpose afo
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
-simile of the emancipation proclamation Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi,d The Washington, in a common cedar holder—all as plain and unostentatious as was the President himself. By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State. By the Emancipation Proclamation 3,063,392 slaves were set free, as follows: Arkansas111,104 Alabama435,132 Florida61,753 Georgia462,232 Mississippi436,696 North Carolina275,081 South Carolina402,541 Texas180,682 Virginia (part)450,437 Louisiana (part)247,734 The pen with which President Lincoln wrote his emancipation
Portsmouth (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
he parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are, and henceforward shall be, free; and that the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. And I hereby en
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
s of General Hunter, the following year. That officer, being in command at Hilton Head, N. C., proclaimed the States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, in his department, under martial law, and May 9, 1862, issued an order in which occurred these words: Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these States—Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina—heretofore held as slaves are therefore declared forever free. Though President Lincoln had been onne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also theEmancipation Proclamation 3,063,392 slaves were set free, as follows: Arkansas111,104 Alabama435,132 Florida61,753 Georgia462,232 Mississippi436,696 North Carolina275,081 South Carolina402,541 Texas180,682 Virginia (part)450,437 Louisian
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry emancipation-proclamations
himself would make the necessary modifications. President Lincoln therefore issued a special order, Sept. 11, 1861, declaring that the emancipation clause of General Fremont's proclamation be so modified, held, and construed as to conform with and not to transcend the provisions on the same subject contained in the act of Congress approved Aug. 6, preceding. Another instance of the kind occurred at the hands of General Hunter, the following year. That officer, being in command at Hilton Head, N. C., proclaimed the States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, in his department, under martial law, and May 9, 1862, issued an order in which occurred these words: Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these States—Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina—heretofore held as slaves are therefore declared forever free. Though President Lincoln had been bitterly censured by extremists for his action towards General Fremont, and though he k
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