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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 51 total hits in 29 results.

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Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): entry foote-andrew-hull
emand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and mounting 176 guns, with a less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and commanded the naval expedition against Fort Henry (q. v.) and Fort Donelson (q. v.) on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, early in 1862, in co-operation with General Grant. In the attack on the latter he was severely wounded in the ankle by a fragment of a shell. Though suffering, he commanded the naval attack on Island number ten (q. v.). After its reduction he returned to his home at New Haven. He was promoted to rear-admiral in July, 1862; and in May, 1863, was ordered to take command of the South Atlantic squadron, but died while preparing in New York to leave for Charleston, June 26.
Sumatra (Indonesia) (search for this): entry foote-andrew-hull
Foote, Andrew Hull 1806- Naval officer; born in New Haven, Conn., Sept. 12, 1806; entered the navy as midshipman in 1822; was flag-lieutenant of the Mediterranean Andrew Hull Foote. squadron in 1833; and in 1838, as first lieutenant of the ship John Adams, under Commodore Read, he circumnavigated the globe, and took part in an attack on the pirates of Sumatra. He was one of the first to introduce (1841) the principle of total abstinence from intoxicating drinks into the United States navy; and on the Cumberland (1843-45) he delivered, on Sundays, extemporary sermons to his crew. He successfully engaged in the suppression of the slave-trade on the coast of Africa in 1849-52. In command of the China station in 1856, when the Chinese and English were at war, Foote exerted himself to protect American property, and was fired upon by the Celestials. His demand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and
re at war, Foote exerted himself to protect American property, and was fired upon by the Celestials. His demand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and mounting 176 guns, with a less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and commanded the naval expedition against Fort Henry (q. v.) and Fort Donelson (q. v.) on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, early in 1862, in co-operation with General Grant. In the attack on the latter he was severely wounded in the ankle by a fragment of a shell. Though suffering, he commanded the naval attack on Island number ten (q. v.). After its reduction he returned to his home at New Haven. He was promoted to rear-admiral in July, 1862; and in May, 1863, was ordered to take c
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry foote-andrew-hull
an property, and was fired upon by the Celestials. His demand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and mounting 176 guns, with a less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and commanded the naval expedition against Fort Henry (q. v.) and Fort Donelson (q. v.) on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, early in 1862, in co-operation with General Grant. In the attack on the latter he was severely wounded in the ankle by a fragment of a shell. Though suffering, he commanded the naval attack on Island number ten (q. v.). After its reduction he returned to his home at New Haven. He was promoted to rear-admiral in July, 1862; and in May, 1863, was ordered to take command of the South Atlantic squadron, but died while
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry foote-andrew-hull
d upon by the Celestials. His demand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and mounting 176 guns, with a less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and commanded the naval expedition against Fort Henry (q. v.) and Fort Donelson (q. v.) on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, early in 1862, in co-operation with General Grant. In the attack on the latter he was severely wounded in the ankle by a fragment of a shell. Though suffering, he commanded the naval attack on Island number ten (q. v.). After its reduction he returned to his home at New Haven. He was promoted to rear-admiral in July, 1862; and in May, 1863, was ordered to take command of the South Atlantic squadron, but died while preparing in New York t
New Haven (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry foote-andrew-hull
Foote, Andrew Hull 1806- Naval officer; born in New Haven, Conn., Sept. 12, 1806; entered the navy as midshipman in 1822; was flag-lieutenant of the Mediterranean Andrew Hull Foote. squadron in 1833; and in 1838, as first lieutenant of the ship John Adams, under Commodore Read, he circumnavigated the globe, and took part in an attack on the pirates of Sumatra. He was one of the first to introduce (1841) the principle of total abstinence from intoxicating drinks into the United States navy; and on the Cumberland (1843-45) he delivered, on Sundays, extemporary sermons to his crew. He successfully engaged in the suppression of the slave-trade on the coast of Africa in 1849-52. In command of the China station in 1856, when the Chinese and English were at war, Foote exerted himself to protect American property, and was fired upon by the Celestials. His demand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and m
command of the China station in 1856, when the Chinese and English were at war, Foote exerted himself to protect American property, and was fired upon by the Celestials. His demand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and mounting 176 guns, with a less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appChinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and commanded the naval expedition against Fort Henry (q. v.) and Fort Donelson (q. v.) on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, early in 1862, in co-operation with General Grant. In the attack on the latter he was severely wounded in the ankle by a fragment of a shell. Though suffering, he commanded the naval attack on Island number ten (q. v.). After its reduction he returned to his home at New Haven. He was promoted
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): entry foote-andrew-hull
His demand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and mounting 176 guns, with a less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and commanded the naval expedition against Fort Henry (q. v.) and Fort Donelson (q. v.) on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, early in 1862, in co-operation with General Grant. In the attack on the latter he was severely wounded in the ankle by a fragment of a shell. Though suffering, he commanded the naval attack on Island number ten (q. v.). After its reduction he returned to his home at New Haven. He was promoted to rear-admiral in July, 1862; and in May, 1863, was ordered to take command of the South Atlantic squadron, but died while preparing in New York to leave for Charleston, Jun
emand for an apology was refused, and he stormed and captured four Chinese forts, composed of granite walls 7 feet thick and mounting 176 guns, with a less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and commanded the naval expedition against Fort Henry (q. v.) and Fort Donelson (q. v.) on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, early in 1862, in co-operation with General Grant. In the attack on the latter he was severely wounded in the ankle by a fragment of a shell. Though suffering, he commanded the naval attack on Island number ten (q. v.). After its reduction he returned to his home at New Haven. He was promoted to rear-admiral in July, 1862; and in May, 1863, was ordered to take command of the South Atlantic squadron, but died while preparing in New York to leave for Charleston, June 26.
Foote, Andrew Hull 1806- Naval officer; born in New Haven, Conn., Sept. 12, 1806; entered the navy as midshipman in 1822; was flag-lieutenant of the Mediterranean Andrew Hull Foote. squadron in 1833; and in 1838, as first lieutenant of the shiAndrew Hull Foote. squadron in 1833; and in 1838, as first lieutenant of the ship John Adams, under Commodore Read, he circumnavigated the globe, and took part in an attack on the pirates of Sumatra. He was one of the first to introduce (1841) the principle of total abstinence from intoxicating drinks into the United States nade on the coast of Africa in 1849-52. In command of the China station in 1856, when the Chinese and English were at war, Foote exerted himself to protect American property, and was fired upon by the Celestials. His demand for an apology was refu less of forty men. The Chinese garrison of 5,000 men lost 400 of their number killed and wounded. In the summer of 1861 Foote was made captain, and in September was appointed flag-officer of a flotilla of gunboats fitted out chiefly at Cairo, and
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