hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 31 total hits in 9 results.

Dauphin Island (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry forts-morgan-and-gaines-seizure-of
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry forts-morgan-and-gaines-seizure-of
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fothat of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry forts-morgan-and-gaines-seizure-of
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. TFort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fi ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry forts-morgan-and-gaines-seizure-of
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.