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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 19 total hits in 12 results.

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Manchester, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): entry french-mansfield
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry french-mansfield
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taFeb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
February 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): entry french-mansfield
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
February 21st, 1810 AD (search for this): entry french-mansfield
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
March 15th, 1876 AD (search for this): entry french-mansfield
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
French, Mansfield 1810-1876 Clergyman; born in Manchester, Vt., Feb. 21, 1810; settled in New York City in 1858, where he became an earnest abolitionist. In 1862 he examined the conditions of the negroes at Port Royal, and on his return to New York held a great meeting at Cooper Institute, Feb. 10, 1862, which resulted in the establishment of the National Freedman's Relief Association with himself as general agent. In March, 1863, with a corps of teachers, he returned to Port Royal and taught the negroes methods of farming. He rendered important service to the government by organizing an expedition which during one period of the Civil War intercepted telegraphic messages from the Confederate armies and forwarded them to Washington. He died at Pearsall's, L. I., March 15, 1876.
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