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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 14 total hits in 7 results.

Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry great-bridge-battle-at-the
Great Bridge, battle at the. On the invasion of the Elizabeth River by Lord Dunmore (November, 1775), Colonel Woodford called the militia to arms. Dunmore fortified a passage of the Elizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, neElizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, negroes, and vagrants, in number about 600. Woodford constructed a small fortification at the opposite end of the bridge. On Saturday morning, Dec. 9, Captains Leslie and Fordyce, sent by Dunmore, attacked the Virginians. After considerable manoelig;uvring and skirmishing, a sharp battle ensued, lasting about twenty-five minutes, when the assailants were repulsed and fled, leaving two spiked field-pieces behind them. The loss of the assailants was fifty-five killed and wounded. Not a Virginia
th River by Lord Dunmore (November, 1775), Colonel Woodford called the militia to arms. Dunmore fortified a passage of the Elizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, negroes, and vagrants, in number about 600. Woodford constructed a small fortification at the opposite end of the bridge. On Saturday morning, Dec. 9, Captains Leslie and Fordyce, sent by Dunmore, attacked the Virginians. After considerable manoelig;uvring and skirmishing, a sharp battle ensued, lasting about twenty-five minutes, when the assailants were repulsed and fled, leaving two spiked field-pieces behind them. The loss of the assailants was fifty-five killed and wounded. Not a Virginian was killed, and only one man was slightly wounded in the battle.
th River by Lord Dunmore (November, 1775), Colonel Woodford called the militia to arms. Dunmore fortified a passage of the Elizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, negroes, and vagrants, in number about 600. Woodford constructed a small fortification at the opposite end of the bridge. On Saturday morning, Dec. 9, Captains Leslie and Fordyce, sent by Dunmore, attacked the Virginians. After considerable manoelig;uvring and skirmishing, a sharp battle ensued, lasting about twenty-five minutes, when the assailants were repulsed and fled, leaving two spiked field-pieces behind them. The loss of the assailants was fifty-five killed and wounded. Not a Virginian was killed, and only one man was slightly wounded in the battle.
Great Bridge, battle at the. On the invasion of the Elizabeth River by Lord Dunmore (November, 1775), Colonel Woodford called the militia to arms. Dunmore fortified a passage of the Elizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, negroes, and vagrants, in number about 600. Woodford constructed a small fortification at the opposite end of the bridge. On Saturday morning, Dec. 9, Captains Leslie and Fordyce, sent by Dunmore, attacked the Virginians. After considerable manoelig;uvring and skirmishing, a sharp battle ensued, lasting about twenty-five minutes, when the assailants were repulsed and fled, leaving two spiked field-pieces behind them. The loss of the assailants was fifty-five killed and wounded. Not a Virginia
Great Bridge, battle at the. On the invasion of the Elizabeth River by Lord Dunmore (November, 1775), Colonel Woodford called the militia to arms. Dunmore fortified a passage of the Elizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, negroes, and vagrants, in number about 600. Woodford constructed a small fortification at the opposite end of the bridge. On Saturday morning, Dec. 9, Captains Leslie and Fordyce, sent by Dunmore, attacked the Virginians. After considerable manoelig;uvring and skirmishing, a sharp battle ensued, lasting about twenty-five minutes, when the assailants were repulsed and fled, leaving two spiked field-pieces behind them. The loss of the assailants was fifty-five killed and wounded. Not a Virginian
eth River by Lord Dunmore (November, 1775), Colonel Woodford called the militia to arms. Dunmore fortified a passage of the Elizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, negroes, and vagrants, in number about 600. Woodford constructed a small fortification at the opposite end of the bridge. On Saturday morning, Dec. 9, Captains Leslie and Fordyce, sent by Dunmore, attacked the Virginians. After considerable manoelig;uvring and skirmishing, a sharp battle ensued, lasting about twenty-five minutes, when the assailants were repulsed and fled, leaving two spiked field-pieces behind them. The loss of the assailants was fifty-five killed and wounded. Not a Virginian was killed, and only one man was slightly wounded in the battle.
Great Bridge, battle at the. On the invasion of the Elizabeth River by Lord Dunmore (November, 1775), Colonel Woodford called the militia to arms. Dunmore fortified a passage of the Elizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, negroes, and vagrants, in number about 600. Woodford constructed a small fortification at the opposite end of the bridge. On Saturday morning, Dec. 9, Captains Leslie and Fordyce, sent by Dunmore, attacked the Virginians. After considerable manoelig;uvring and skirmishing, a sharp battle ensued, lasting about twenty-five minutes, when the assailants were repulsed and fled, leaving two spiked field-pieces behind them. The loss of the assailants was fifty-five killed and wounded. Not a Virginian