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Hatcher's Run (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry hatcher-s-run-battle-of
Hatcher's Run, battle of. On Sun- Hatcher's Run. day morning, Feb. 5, 1865, a strong flanking column of Nationals moved on the rightHatcher's Run. day morning, Feb. 5, 1865, a strong flanking column of Nationals moved on the right of the lines of the Confederates at Petersburg, beyond Hatcher's Run, to strike the South-side Railway. The entire National army in front oHatcher's Run, to strike the South-side Railway. The entire National army in front of Petersburg had received marching orders to meet whatever might be developed by the movement. This flanking movement was led by Warren's aninstructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, while Warren should move around to the flank and strike the reA division of Humphrey's corps carried the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, making the passage of it safe for the Nationals. The latter cd stood firm, and made a permanent extension of Grant's line to Hatcher's Run. The City Point Railroad was extended to that stream. In the nded to that stream. In the battle at Hatcher's Run the Nationals lost nearly 2,000 men; the Confederates, 1,000. General Pegram was killed.
Wade Hampton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry hatcher-s-run-battle-of
n the Jerusalem Plank-road to Reams' Station. The divisions of Ayres, Griffin, and Crawford, of Warren's corps, moved along another road, while portions of Humphrey's corps (Mott's and Smyth's divisions) moved along still another road, with instructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, while Warren should move around to the flank and strike the rear of their adversaries. The cavalry had pushed on from Reams's Station to Dinwiddie Courthouse, encountering Wade Hampton's cavalry, dismounted and intrenched. A division of Humphrey's corps carried the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, making the passage of it safe for the Nationals. The latter cast up temporary earthworks, which were assailed in the afternoon, the Confederates pressing through a tangled swamp. They were repulsed. The Nationals lost about 300 men; their antagonists a few more. Warren's corps took position on the left of Humphrey's during the night, and the cavalry were recalled. Two
onfederates at Petersburg, beyond Hatcher's Run, to strike the South-side Railway. The entire National army in front of Petersburg had received marching orders to meet whatever might be developed by the movement. This flanking movement was led by Warren's and Humphrey's corps, and Gregg's cavalry. The cavalry moved down the Jerusalem Plank-road to Reams' Station. The divisions of Ayres, Griffin, and Crawford, of Warren's corps, moved along another road, while portions of Humphrey's corps (Mott's and Smyth's divisions) moved along still another road, with instructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, while Warren should move around to the flank and strike the rear of their adversaries. The cavalry had pushed on from Reams's Station to Dinwiddie Courthouse, encountering Wade Hampton's cavalry, dismounted and intrenched. A division of Humphrey's corps carried the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, making the passage of it safe for the Nationals. Th
e of it safe for the Nationals. The latter cast up temporary earthworks, which were assailed in the afternoon, the Confederates pressing through a tangled swamp. They were repulsed. The Nationals lost about 300 men; their antagonists a few more. Warren's corps took position on the left of Humphrey's during the night, and the cavalry were recalled. Two other corps were disposed so as to assist, if necessary. Towards noon (Feb. 6), Crawford, moving towards Dabney's Mills, met and fought the Confederates under Pegram. The latter were repulsed, but finally the Nationals were pushed back with heavy loss. Then the Confederates attacked Humphrey's corps, and were repulsed in disorder. The Nationals were rallied behind intrenchments and stood firm, and made a permanent extension of Grant's line to Hatcher's Run. The City Point Railroad was extended to that stream. In the battle at Hatcher's Run the Nationals lost nearly 2,000 men; the Confederates, 1,000. General Pegram was killed.
sition on the left of Humphrey's during the night, and the cavalry were recalled. Two other corps were disposed so as to assist, if necessary. Towards noon (Feb. 6), Crawford, moving towards Dabney's Mills, met and fought the Confederates under Pegram. The latter were repulsed, but finally the Nationals were pushed back with heavy loss. Then the Confederates attacked Humphrey's corps, and were repulsed in disorder. The Nationals were rallied behind intrenchments and stood firm, and made a p Confederates under Pegram. The latter were repulsed, but finally the Nationals were pushed back with heavy loss. Then the Confederates attacked Humphrey's corps, and were repulsed in disorder. The Nationals were rallied behind intrenchments and stood firm, and made a permanent extension of Grant's line to Hatcher's Run. The City Point Railroad was extended to that stream. In the battle at Hatcher's Run the Nationals lost nearly 2,000 men; the Confederates, 1,000. General Pegram was killed.
to meet whatever might be developed by the movement. This flanking movement was led by Warren's and Humphrey's corps, and Gregg's cavalry. The cavalry moved down the Jerusalem Plank-road to Reams' Station. The divisions of Ayres, Griffin, and Crawford, of Warren's corps, moved along another road, while portions of Humphrey's corps (Mott's and Smyth's divisions) moved along still another road, with instructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, while Warren shounals lost about 300 men; their antagonists a few more. Warren's corps took position on the left of Humphrey's during the night, and the cavalry were recalled. Two other corps were disposed so as to assist, if necessary. Towards noon (Feb. 6), Crawford, moving towards Dabney's Mills, met and fought the Confederates under Pegram. The latter were repulsed, but finally the Nationals were pushed back with heavy loss. Then the Confederates attacked Humphrey's corps, and were repulsed in disorder.
Hatcher's Run, battle of. On Sun- Hatcher's Run. day morning, Feb. 5, 1865, a strong flanking column of Nationals moved on the right of the lines of the Confederates at Petersburg, beyond Hatcher's Run, to strike the South-side Railway. The entire National army in front of Petersburg had received marching orders to meet whatever might be developed by the movement. This flanking movement was led by Warren's and Humphrey's corps, and Gregg's cavalry. The cavalry moved down the Jerusalem Plank-road to Reams' Station. The divisions of Ayres, Griffin, and Crawford, of Warren's corps, moved along another road, while portions of Humphrey's corps (Mott's and Smyth's divisions) moved along still another road, with instructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, while Warren should move around to the flank and strike the rear of their adversaries. The cavalry had pushed on from Reams's Station to Dinwiddie Courthouse, encountering Wade Hampton's cava
burg had received marching orders to meet whatever might be developed by the movement. This flanking movement was led by Warren's and Humphrey's corps, and Gregg's cavalry. The cavalry moved down the Jerusalem Plank-road to Reams' Station. The divisions of Ayres, Griffin, and Crawford, of Warren's corps, moved along another road, while portions of Humphrey's corps (Mott's and Smyth's divisions) moved along still another road, with instructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, while Warren should move around to the flank and strike the rear of their adversaries. The cavalry had pushed on from Reams's Station to Dinwiddie Courthouse, encountering Wade Hampton's cavalry, dismounted and intrenched. A divisi pressing through a tangled swamp. They were repulsed. The Nationals lost about 300 men; their antagonists a few more. Warren's corps took position on the left of Humphrey's during the night, and the cavalry were recalled. Two other corps were di
morning, Feb. 5, 1865, a strong flanking column of Nationals moved on the right of the lines of the Confederates at Petersburg, beyond Hatcher's Run, to strike the South-side Railway. The entire National army in front of Petersburg had received marching orders to meet whatever might be developed by the movement. This flanking movement was led by Warren's and Humphrey's corps, and Gregg's cavalry. The cavalry moved down the Jerusalem Plank-road to Reams' Station. The divisions of Ayres, Griffin, and Crawford, of Warren's corps, moved along another road, while portions of Humphrey's corps (Mott's and Smyth's divisions) moved along still another road, with instructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, while Warren should move around to the flank and strike the rear of their adversaries. The cavalry had pushed on from Reams's Station to Dinwiddie Courthouse, encountering Wade Hampton's cavalry, dismounted and intrenched. A division of Humphrey's cor
at Petersburg, beyond Hatcher's Run, to strike the South-side Railway. The entire National army in front of Petersburg had received marching orders to meet whatever might be developed by the movement. This flanking movement was led by Warren's and Humphrey's corps, and Gregg's cavalry. The cavalry moved down the Jerusalem Plank-road to Reams' Station. The divisions of Ayres, Griffin, and Crawford, of Warren's corps, moved along another road, while portions of Humphrey's corps (Mott's and Smyth's divisions) moved along still another road, with instructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, while Warren should move around to the flank and strike the rear of their adversaries. The cavalry had pushed on from Reams's Station to Dinwiddie Courthouse, encountering Wade Hampton's cavalry, dismounted and intrenched. A division of Humphrey's corps carried the Confederate works on Hatcher's Run, making the passage of it safe for the Nationals. The latter ca
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