hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 27 total hits in 15 results.

1 2
Post, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): entry hindman-fort
Hindman, Fort A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977 m
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): entry hindman-fort
Hindman, Fort A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977 m
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): entry hindman-fort
Hindman, Fort A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): entry hindman-fort
Hindman, Fort A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977 m
ort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the armythe army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977 men, of whom 129 were killed. The spoils were about 5,000 prisoners, seven cannon, 3,000 small-arms, and a large quantity of stores. The fort was blown up, and property which could not be carried away was destroyed.
Fitz-John Porter (search for this): entry hindman-fort
Hindman, Fort A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977 m
Peter Joseph Osterhaus (search for this): entry hindman-fort
A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977 men, of whom 129 we
John A. McClernand (search for this): entry hindman-fort
Hindman, Fort A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. JGenerals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977
Andrew Jackson Smith (search for this): entry hindman-fort
Hindman, Fort A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977 me
Hindman, Fort A Confederate fortification at Arkansas Post, Ark., on the Arkansas River, 73 miles southeast of Little Rock. In the winter of 1862-63, General Sherman and Commodore Porter planned an attack upon the fort. General McClernand, who had arrived and taken the chief command, accompanied the expedition from near Vicksburg. The troops landed, about 25,000 strong, 3 miles below the fort, on Jan. 9, 1863, and were led by Generals McClernand, Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. Sherman, Morgan, Steele, Stewart, A. J. Smith, and Osterhaus. Porter had a strong flotilla of Plan of the attack on Fort Hindman. armored and unarmored gunboats. The latter, moving on, shelled the Confederates out of their rifle-pits; and on the 11th the army moved against Fort Hindman. When the gunboats opened fire upon it, Morgan's artillery covered the advance. After a fight for about two hours, the Confederates raised a white flag, while troops, which had stormed the works, were swarming over them. The Nationals lost 977
1 2