hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 43 total hits in 21 results.

1 2 3
United States (United States) (search for this): entry impeachment
Impeachment. The Constitution of the United States gives the House of Representatives sole power to impeach the President, Vice-President, and all civil officers of the United States by a numerical majority only. It also gives the Senate solUnited States by a numerical majority only. It also gives the Senate sole power to try all impeachments. The Senate then sits as a court, organizing anew, Senators taking a special oath or affirmation applicable to the proceeding. From their decision there is no appeal. A vote of two-thirds of the Senate is necessaryoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for watrict judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War, impeached
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry impeachment
d enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War, impeached for receiving money of posttraders among the Indians, March 2, 1876; resigned at the same time; acquitted for want of jurisdi
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry impeachment
ding. From their decision there is no appeal. A vote of two-thirds of the Senate is necessary to convict. When the President is tried the chief-justice presides. The punishment is limited by the Constitution (1) to removal from office; (2) to disqualification from holding and enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson,<
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry impeachment
limited by the Constitution (1) to removal from office; (2) to disqualification from holding and enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War, impeached for receiving money of posttraders<
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): entry impeachment
When the President is tried the chief-justice presides. The punishment is limited by the Constitution (1) to removal from office; (2) to disqualification from holding and enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W<
d enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War, impeached for receiving money of posttraders among the Indians, March 2, 1876; resigned at the same time; acquitted for want of jurisdi
West H. Humphreys (search for this): entry impeachment
enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War, impeached for receiving money of posttraders among the Indians, March 2, 1876; resigned at the same time; acquitted for want of jurisdi
en sits as a court, organizing anew, Senators taking a special oath or affirmation applicable to the proceeding. From their decision there is no appeal. A vote of two-thirds of the Senate is necessary to convict. When the President is tried the chief-justice presides. The punishment is limited by the Constitution (1) to removal from office; (2) to disqualification from holding and enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphrey
Constitution (1) to removal from office; (2) to disqualification from holding and enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War, impeached for receiving money of posttraders among the India<
William W. Belknap (search for this): entry impeachment
enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors, Feb. 22, 1868; acquitted. (7) W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War, impeached for receiving money of posttraders among the Indians, March 2, 1876; resigned at the same time; acquitted for want of jurisdi
1 2 3