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Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry jonesboro-battle-of
Jonesboro, battle of. Sherman began his flanking when he raised the siege of Atlanta (q. v.), on the night of Aug. 25, 1864. General Slocum, with the 20th Corps, proceeded to the protection of the sick, wounded, and stores near the Chattahoochady Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was by Howard. Hardee recoiled, and in his hasty retreat left 400 of his dead on the field and 300 of his badly wounded at Jonesboro. His loss was estimated at 2,500 men. Howard's loss was about 500. Meanwhile Sherman had sent relief to Howard. Kilp soon touched Howard's left. At four o'clock in the afternoon Davis charged and carried the Confederate works covering Jonesboro on the north, and captured General Govan and a greater part of his brigade. In the morning Hardee had fled, pursued by
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry jonesboro-battle-of
of Aug. 25, 1864. General Slocum, with the 20th Corps, proceeded to the protection of the sick, wounded, and stores near the Chattahoochee, and Howard and the rest of the army moved for the West Point Railway. General Stanley's corps was on the extreme left, and the armies of Howard, Thomas, and Schofield pressed forward so secretly that Hood was not informed of the movement until the Nationals were destroying that road. This was done, Aug. 28, for 12 miles, and the next day they struck the Macon road. Schofield reached the road at Rough-and-Ready Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was holding the defences of Atlanta, but he was too weak to attempt to strike Schofield. There was a severe fight at the passage of the Flint River, on the morning of Aug. 31, between the forces of How
Flint (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry jonesboro-battle-of
ere destroying that road. This was done, Aug. 28, for 12 miles, and the next day they struck the Macon road. Schofield reached the road at Rough-and-Ready Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was holding the defences of Atlanta, but he was too weak to attempt to strike Schofield. There was a severe fight at the passage of the Flint River, on the morning of Aug. 31, between the forces of Howard and Hardee. Howard's army was disposed with Blair's corps in the centre, and rude breastworks were cast up. The contest was renewed very soon, when Hardee attempted to crush Howard before he could receive reinforcements. He failed. The Nationals thus attacked were veterans. For two hours there was a desperate strife for victory, which was won by Howard. Hardee recoiled, and in his hasty
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry jonesboro-battle-of
y that Hood was not informed of the movement until the Nationals were destroying that road. This was done, Aug. 28, for 12 miles, and the next day they struck the Macon road. Schofield reached the road at Rough-and-Ready Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was holding the defences of AtlantaAtlanta, but he was too weak to attempt to strike Schofield. There was a severe fight at the passage of the Flint River, on the morning of Aug. 31, between the forces of Howard and Hardee. Howard's army was disposed with Blair's corps in the centre, and rude breastworks were cast up. The contest was renewed very soon, when Hardee attempted to crush Howard before he could receive reinforcements. He failed. The Nationals thus attacked were veterans. For two hours there was a desperate strife for vi
River, on the morning of Aug. 31, between the forces of Howard and Hardee. Howard's army was disposed with Blair's corps in the centre, and rude breastworks were cast up. The contest was renewed very soon, when Hardee attempted to crush Howard before he could receive reinforcements. He failed. The Nationals thus attacked were veterans. For two hours there was a desperate strife for victory, which was won by Howard. Hardee recoiled, and in his hasty retreat left 400 of his dead on the field and 300 of his badly wounded at Jonesboro. His loss was estimated at 2,500 men. Howard's loss was about 500. Meanwhile Sherman had sent relief to Howard. Kilpatrick and Garrard were very active, and General Davis's corps soon touched Howard's left. At four o'clock in the afternoon Davis charged and carried the Confederate works covering Jonesboro on the north, and captured General Govan and a greater part of his brigade. In the morning Hardee had fled, pursued by the Nationals to Lovejoy's.
William Joseph Hardee (search for this): entry jonesboro-battle-of
Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was holding the defences of Atlanta, but he was too weak to attempt to strike Schofield. There was a severe fight at the passage of the Flint River, on the morning of Aug. 31, between the forces of Howard and Hardee. Howard's army was disposed with Blair's corps in the centre, and rude breastworks were cast up. The contest was renewed very soon, when Hardee attempted to crush Howard before he could receive reinforcements. He failed. The Nationals thus attacked were veterans. For two hours there was a desperate strife for victory, which was won by Howard. Hardee recoiled, and in his Hardee recoiled, and in his hasty retreat left 400 of his dead on the field and 300 of his badly wounded at Jonesboro. His loss was estimated at 2,500 men. Howard's loss was about 500. Meanwhile Sherman had sent relief to Howard. Kilpatrick and Garrard were very active, and
Jonesboro, battle of. Sherman began his flanking when he raised the siege of Atlanta (q. v.), on the night of Aug. 25, 1864. General Slocum, with the 20th Corps, proceeded to the protection of the sick, wounded, and stores near the Chattahoochee, and Howard and the rest of the army moved for the West Point Railway. General Stanley's corps was on the extreme left, and the armies of Howard, Thomas, and Schofield pressed forward so secretly that Hood was not informed of the movement until the Nationals were destroying that road. This was done, Aug. 28, for 12 miles, and the next day they struck the Macon road. Schofield reached the road at Rough-and-Ready Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was holding the defences of Atlanta, but he was too weak to attempt to strike Schofield.
Jonesboro, battle of. Sherman began his flanking when he raised the siege of Atlanta (q. v.), on the night of Aug. 25, 1864. General Slocum, with the 20th Corps, proceeded to the protection of the sick, wounded, and stores near the Chattahoochee, and Howard and the rest of the army moved for the West Point Railway. General Stanley's corps was on the extreme left, and the armies of Howard, Thomas, and Schofield pressed forward so secretly that Hood was not informed of the movement until the Nationals were destroying that road. This was done, Aug. 28, for 12 miles, and the next day they struck the Macon road. Schofield reached the road at Rough-and-Ready Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was holding the defences of Atlanta, but he was too weak to attempt to strike Schofield.
eady Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was holding the defences of Atlanta, but he was too weak to attempt to strike Schofield. There was a severe fight at the passage of the Flint River, on the morning of Aug. 31, between the forces of Howard and Hardee. Howard's army was disposed with Blair's corps in the centre, and rude breastworks were cast up. The contest was renewed very soon, when Hardee attempted to crush Howard before he could receive reinforcements. He failed. The Nationals thus attacked were veterans. For two hours there was a desperate strife for victory, which was won by Howard. Hardee recoiled, and in his hasty retreat left 400 of his dead on the field and 300 of his badly wounded at Jonesboro. His loss was estimated at 2,500 men. Howard's loss was about 500.
res near the Chattahoochee, and Howard and the rest of the army moved for the West Point Railway. General Stanley's corps was on the extreme left, and the armies of Howard, Thomas, and Schofield pressed forward so secretly that Hood was not informed of the movement until the Nationals were destroying that road. This was done, Aug. 28, for 12 miles, and the next day they struck the Macon road. Schofield reached the road at Rough-and-Ready Station, 10 miles from Atlanta. Thomas struck it at Couch's; and Howard, crossing the Flint River half a mile from Jonesboro, approached it at that point. There he was met by one-half of Hood's army, under Hardee. With the remainder Hood was holding the defences of Atlanta, but he was too weak to attempt to strike Schofield. There was a severe fight at the passage of the Flint River, on the morning of Aug. 31, between the forces of Howard and Hardee. Howard's army was disposed with Blair's corps in the centre, and rude breastworks were cast up.
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