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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 50 total hits in 26 results.

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United States (United States) (search for this): entry lee-ann
Lee, Ann 1736-1784 Founder of the American Society of Shakers; born in Manchester, England, Feb. 29, 1736; was a cook in a public institution when she married a blacksmith named Stanley. In 1758 she joined the Shakers in England. The society had just been formed by James and Jane Wardley, Quakers. About 1770 she began to prophesy against the wickedness of marriage as the root of all human depravity, and resumed her maiden name of Lee. She came to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted
Columbia county (New York, United States) (search for this): entry lee-ann
came to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted to the doctrines of Ann Lee, and the now flourishing Society of Shakers of New Lebanon was founded. She and some of her followers made missionary tours into New England with considerable success from 1781 to 1783, and so greatly were her spiritual gifts manifested that she was acknowledged a mother in Christ —the incarnation of the feminine essence of God. She was called Mother Ann and Ann the word. She died in Watervliet, N. Y., Sept. 8, 178
Poughkeepsie (New York, United States) (search for this): entry lee-ann
een formed by James and Jane Wardley, Quakers. About 1770 she began to prophesy against the wickedness of marriage as the root of all human depravity, and resumed her maiden name of Lee. She came to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted to the doctrines of Ann Lee, and the now flourishing Society of Shakers of New Lebanon was founded. She and some of her followers made missionary tours into New England with considerable success from 1781 to 1783, and so greatly were her spiritual gifts man
Manchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry lee-ann
Lee, Ann 1736-1784 Founder of the American Society of Shakers; born in Manchester, England, Feb. 29, 1736; was a cook in a public institution when she married a blacksmith named Stanley. In 1758 she joined the Shakers in England. The society had just been formed by James and Jane Wardley, Quakers. About 1770 she began to prophesy against the wickedness of marriage as the root of all human depravity, and resumed her maiden name of Lee. She came to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted
Niskayuna (New York, United States) (search for this): entry lee-ann
can Society of Shakers; born in Manchester, England, Feb. 29, 1736; was a cook in a public institution when she married a blacksmith named Stanley. In 1758 she joined the Shakers in England. The society had just been formed by James and Jane Wardley, Quakers. About 1770 she began to prophesy against the wickedness of marriage as the root of all human depravity, and resumed her maiden name of Lee. She came to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted to the doctrines of Ann Lee, and the now flo
Watervliet (New York, United States) (search for this): entry lee-ann
human depravity, and resumed her maiden name of Lee. She came to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted to the doctrines of Ann Lee, and the now flourishing Societ followers made missionary tours into New England with considerable success from 1781 to 1783, and so greatly were her spiritual gifts manifested that she was acknowledged a mother in Christ —the incarnation of the feminine essence of God. She was called Mother Ann and Ann the word. She died in Watervliet, N. Y., Sept. 8, 178
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry lee-ann
Lee, Ann 1736-1784 Founder of the American Society of Shakers; born in Manchester, England, Feb. 29, 1736; was a cook in a public institution when she married a blacksmith named Stanley. In 1758 she joined the Shakers in England. The society had just been formed by James and Jane Wardley, Quakers. About 1770 she began to prophesy against the wickedness of marriage as the root of all human depravity, and resumed her maiden name of Lee. She came to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted
New England (United States) (search for this): entry lee-ann
me to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted to the doctrines of Ann Lee, and the now flourishing Society of Shakers of New Lebanon was founded. She and some of her followers made missionary tours into New England with considerable success from 1781 to 1783, and so greatly were her spiritual gifts manifested that she was acknowledged a mother in Christ —the incarnation of the feminine essence of God. She was called Mother Ann and Ann the word. She died in Watervliet, N. Y., Sept. 8, 178
Jesus Christ (search for this): entry lee-ann
ame to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted to the doctrines of Ann Lee, and the now flourishing Society of Shakers of New Lebanon was founded. She and some of her followers made missionary tours into New England with considerable success from 1781 to 1783, and so greatly were her spiritual gifts manifested that she was acknowledged a mother in Christ —the incarnation of the feminine essence of God. She was called Mother Ann and Ann the word. She died in Watervliet, N. Y., Sept. 8, 178
William E. Stanley (search for this): entry lee-ann
Lee, Ann 1736-1784 Founder of the American Society of Shakers; born in Manchester, England, Feb. 29, 1736; was a cook in a public institution when she married a blacksmith named Stanley. In 1758 she joined the Shakers in England. The society had just been formed by James and Jane Wardley, Quakers. About 1770 she began to prophesy against the wickedness of marriage as the root of all human depravity, and resumed her maiden name of Lee. She came to America with some followers in 1774, and in 1776 they established themselves at Niskayuna, near Watervliet, where she was the recognized leader of the sect. Being opposed to war, she was suspected of being a British emissary, and, being charged with high treason, was imprisoned at Albany and Poughkeepsie until released by Governor Clinton in 1777, when she returned to Watervliet, and there her followers greatly increased. During a religious revival in New Lebanon (since in Columbia county, N. Y.) in 1780 many persons were converted
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