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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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Montpelier (Vermont, United States) (search for this): entry madison-james
member of the executive council in 1778, and was sent to Congress in 1779. In that body he continually opposed the issue of paper money by the States. He was active until the peace in 1783, when he retired to private life, but was drawn out Montpelier, the home of Madison. again as a delegate to the convention that framed the national Constitution. In that body he took a prominent part in the debates, and wrote some of the papers in The Federalist, which advocated the adoption of that instrnt of Great Britain, and, in 1812, was compelled to declare war against that nation (see below). He was enabled to proclaim a treaty of peace in February, 1815. Retiring from office in 1817, he passed the remainder of his days on his estate at Montpelier. His accomplished wife, Dorothy (commonly called Dolly ), shared his joys and sorrows from the time of their marriage in Philadelphia in 1794 until his death, June 28, 1836, and survived him until July 2, 1849. She was a long time among the l
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry madison-james
retensions advanced by the French government for which the United States are so far from having made themselves responsible that, in official explanations which have been published to the world, and in a correspondence of the American minister at London with the British minister for foreign affairs, such a responsibility was explicitly and emphatically disclaimed. It has become, indeed, sufficiently certain that the commerce of the United States is to be sacrificed, not as interfering with thole plea for them, received no attention. If no other proof existed of a predetermination of the British government against a repeal of its orders, it might be found in the correspondence of the minister plenipotentiary of the United States at London and the British secretary for foreign affairs in 1810, on the question whether the blockade of May, 1806, was considered as in force or as not in force. It had been ascertained that the French government, which urged this blockade as the ground
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry madison-james
s about impressment with the government of Great Britain, and, in 1812, was compelled to declare wang relations between the United States and Great Britain: Washington, June 1, 1812. To the Senre them on the subject of our affairs with Great Britain. Without going back beyond the renewal in 1803 of the war in which Great Britain is engaged, and omitting unrepaired wrongs of inferior maepeal of his prohibition of our trade with Great Britain, her cabinet, instead of a corresponding rinterfering with the belligerent rights of Great Britain; not as supplying the wants of her enemies be no sufficient objection on the part of Great Britain to a formal revocation of it, and no imagiver. We behold, in fine, on the side of Great Britain a state of war against the United States, the United States a state of peace towards Great Britain. Whether the United States shall contint war exists between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the dependencies thereof a[6 more...]
Berlin (Berlin, Germany) (search for this): entry madison-james
or them, received no attention. If no other proof existed of a predetermination of the British government against a repeal of its orders, it might be found in the correspondence of the minister plenipotentiary of the United States at London and the British secretary for foreign affairs in 1810, on the question whether the blockade of May, 1806, was considered as in force or as not in force. It had been ascertained that the French government, which urged this blockade as the ground of its Berlin decree, was willing in the event of its removal to repeal that decree, which, being followed by alternate repeals of the other offensive edicts, might abolish the whole system on both sides. This inviting opportunity for accomplishing an object so important to the United States, and professed so often to be the desire of both the belligerents, was made known to the British government. As that government admits that an actual application of an adequate force is necessary to the existence
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry madison-james
he Declaration of Independence and the autographs of the signers, which she had also resolved to save, she hastened to the carriage, with her sister and her husband, and was borne away to a place of safety beyond the Potomac. Barker and De Peyster rolled up the picture, and, with it, accompanied a portion of the retreating army, and so saved it. That picture was left at a farm-house, and a few weeks afterwards Mr. Barker restored it to Mrs. Madison. It now hangs in the Blue Room of the White House in Washington. The revered parchment is still preserved by the government. Message on British aggressions. On June 1, 1812, President Madison sent to Congress the following message detailing the existing relations between the United States and Great Britain: Washington, June 1, 1812. To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States,—I communicate to Congress certain documents, being a continuation of those heretofore laid before them on the subject of our affair
resorted at length to the sweeping system of blockades, under the name of orders in council, which has been moulded and managed as might best suit its political views, its commercial jealousies, or the avidity of British cruisers. To our remonstrances against the complicated and transcendent injustice of this innovation the first reply was that the orders were reluctantly adopted by Great Britain as a necessary retaliation on decrees of her enemy proclaiming a general blockade of the British Isles at a time when the naval force of that enemy dared not issue from his own ports. She was reminded without effect that her own prior blockades, unsupported by an adequate naval force actually applied and continued, were a bar to this plea; that executed edicts against millions of our property could not be retaliation on edicts confessedly impossible to be executed; that retaliation, to be just, should fall on the party setting the guilty example, not on an innocent party which was not ev
Port Conway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry madison-james
Madison, James 1751- Fourth President of the United States, from March 4, 1809, to March 4, 1817; Republican; born in Port Conway, Va., March 16, 1751; graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1771, studied law, and in 1776 was elected to a seat in the Virginia Assembly. He became a member of the executive council in 1778, and was sent to Congress in 1779. In that body he continually opposed the issue of paper money by the States. He was active until the peace in 1783, when he retired to private life, but was drawn out Montpelier, the home of Madison. again as a delegate to the convention that framed the national Constitution. In that body he took a prominent part in the debates, and wrote some of the papers in The Federalist, which advocated the adoption of that instrument. He was also in the Virginia Convention in 1788 that ratified the Constitution. A member of Congress from 1789 to 1797, Madison did much in the establishment of the nation on a firm foundation. Unitin
.] Done at the city of Washington, the 19th day of June, 1812, and of the Independence of the United States the thirty-sixth. James Madison. By the President: James Monroe, Secretary of State. Message on peace treaty. Washington, Feb. 18, 1815. To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, I lay before Congress copies of the treaty of peace and amity between the United States and his Britannic Majesty, which was signed by the commissioners of both parties at Ghent on Dec. 24, 1814, and the ratifications of which have been duly exchanged. While performing this act I congratulate you and our constituents upon an event which is highly honorable to the nation, and terminates with peculiar felicity a campaign signalized by the most brilliant successes. The late war, although reluctantly declared by Congress, had become a necessary resort to assert the rights and independence of the nation. It has been waged with a success which is the natural result
nd the French government will speedily enable Congress to decide with greater advantage on the course due to the rights, the interests, and the honor of our country. Proclamation of War. By the President of the United States of America: a proclamation. Whereas the Congress of the United States, by virtue of the constituted authority vested in them, have declared by their act bearing date the 18th day of the present month that war exists between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the dependencies thereof and the United States of America and their Territories: Now, therefore, I, James Madison, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the same to all whom it may concern: and I do specially enjoin on all persons holding offices, civil or military, under the authority of the United States that they be vigilant and zealous in discharging the duties respectively incident thereto; and I do moreover exhort all the good people of the United States
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): entry madison-james
will have been seen also that no indemnity had been provider or satisfactorily pledged for the extensive spoliations committed under the violent and retrospective orders of the French government against the property of our citizens seized within the jurisdiction of France. I abstain at this time from recommending to the consideration of Congress definitive measures with respect to that nation, in the expectation that the result of unclosed discussions between our minister plenipotentiary at Paris and the French government will speedily enable Congress to decide with greater advantage on the course due to the rights, the interests, and the honor of our country. Proclamation of War. By the President of the United States of America: a proclamation. Whereas the Congress of the United States, by virtue of the constituted authority vested in them, have declared by their act bearing date the 18th day of the present month that war exists between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
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