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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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nt of the National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of numerous scientific organizations. In 1898 he presented the collections of his lifetime to Yale University, and also gave his estate, having a supposed value of $150,000, to that institution. His publications include Odontornithes: a monograph on the extinct Toothed birds of North America; Dinocerata: a monograph of an extinct order of gigantic mammals; and The dinosaurs of North America. He died in New Haven, Conn., March 18, 1899.nt of the National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of numerous scientific organizations. In 1898 he presented the collections of his lifetime to Yale University, and also gave his estate, having a supposed value of $150,000, to that institution. His publications include Odontornithes: a monograph on the extinct Toothed birds of North America; Dinocerata: a monograph of an extinct order of gigantic mammals; and The dinosaurs of North America. He died in New Haven, Conn., March 18, 1899.
New Haven (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry marsh-othniel-charles
rtebrates, more than half of which he classified and described. Among his more important finds were a sub-class of birds with teeth, which he named Odontornithes; two new classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new orders of dinosaurs, supposed to be the largest land animals yet discovered, etc. In 1877 he received the first Bigsby medal given by the Geological Society of London, and in 1898 the Cuvier prize of the French Academy of Sciences. In 1883-95 he was president of the National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of numerous scientific organizations. In 1898 he presented the collections of his lifetime to Yale University, and also gave his estate, having a supposed value of $150,000, to that institution. His publications include Odontornithes: a monograph on the extinct Toothed birds of North America; Dinocerata: a monograph of an extinct order of gigantic mammals; and The dinosaurs of North America. He died in New Haven, Conn., March 18, 1899.
United States (United States) (search for this): entry marsh-othniel-charles
kport, N. Y., Oct. 29, 1831; graduated at Yale University in 1860. After taking a course of science in the Sheffield School, he went to Germany, where he devoted three years to the study of zoology, mineralogy, and geology. Returning to the United States, he was called to the chair of Paleontology at Yale University in 1866, which he retained till his death. In 1868 he made his first visit to the region of the Rocky Mountains, to study its inexhaustible fossil remains. Later he organized and conducted several scientific expeditions to that region. During 1882-99 he was vertebrate paleontologist for the United States geological survey. He discovered more than 1,000 new fossil vertebrates, more than half of which he classified and described. Among his more important finds were a sub-class of birds with teeth, which he named Odontornithes; two new classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new orders of dinosaurs, supposed to be the largest land animals ye
Lockport, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry marsh-othniel-charles
Marsh, Othniel Charles 1831-1899 Paleontologist; born in Lockport, N. Y., Oct. 29, 1831; graduated at Yale University in 1860. After taking a course of science in the Sheffield School, he went to Germany, where he devoted three years to the study of zoology, mineralogy, and geology. Returning to the United States, he was called to the chair of Paleontology at Yale University in 1866, which he retained till his death. In 1868 he made his first visit to the region of the Rocky Mountains, to study its inexhaustible fossil remains. Later he organized and conducted several scientific expeditions to that region. During 1882-99 he was vertebrate paleontologist for the United States geological survey. He discovered more than 1,000 new fossil vertebrates, more than half of which he classified and described. Among his more important finds were a sub-class of birds with teeth, which he named Odontornithes; two new classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry marsh-othniel-charles
tologist for the United States geological survey. He discovered more than 1,000 new fossil vertebrates, more than half of which he classified and described. Among his more important finds were a sub-class of birds with teeth, which he named Odontornithes; two new classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new orders of dinosaurs, supposed to be the largest land animals yet discovered, etc. In 1877 he received the first Bigsby medal given by the Geological Society of London, and in 1898 the Cuvier prize of the French Academy of Sciences. In 1883-95 he was president of the National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of numerous scientific organizations. In 1898 he presented the collections of his lifetime to Yale University, and also gave his estate, having a supposed value of $150,000, to that institution. His publications include Odontornithes: a monograph on the extinct Toothed birds of North America; Dinocerata: a monograph of an extinct order of gigan
Othniel Charles Marsh (search for this): entry marsh-othniel-charles
Marsh, Othniel Charles 1831-1899 Paleontologist; born in Lockport, N. Y., Oct. 29, 1831; graduated at Yale University in 1860. After taking a course of science in the Sheffield School, he went to Germany, where he devoted three years to the study of zoology, mineralogy, and geology. Returning to the United States, he was called to the chair of Paleontology at Yale University in 1866, which he retained till his death. In 1868 he made his first visit to the region of the Rocky Mountains, to study its inexhaustible fossil remains. Later he organized and conducted several scientific expeditions to that region. During 1882-99 he was vertebrate paleontologist for the United States geological survey. He discovered more than 1,000 new fossil vertebrates, more than half of which he classified and described. Among his more important finds were a sub-class of birds with teeth, which he named Odontornithes; two new classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new o
After taking a course of science in the Sheffield School, he went to Germany, where he devoted three years to the study of zoology, mineralogy, and geology. Returning to the United States, he was called to the chair of Paleontology at Yale University in 1866, which he retained till his death. In 1868 he made his first visit to the region of the Rocky Mountains, to study its inexhaustible fossil remains. Later he organized and conducted several scientific expeditions to that region. During 1882-99 he was vertebrate paleontologist for the United States geological survey. He discovered more than 1,000 new fossil vertebrates, more than half of which he classified and described. Among his more important finds were a sub-class of birds with teeth, which he named Odontornithes; two new classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new orders of dinosaurs, supposed to be the largest land animals yet discovered, etc. In 1877 he received the first Bigsby medal given by
Marsh, Othniel Charles 1831-1899 Paleontologist; born in Lockport, N. Y., Oct. 29, 1831; graduated at Yale University in 1860. After taking a course of science in the Sheffield School, he went to Germany, where he devoted three years to the study of zoology, mineralogy, and geology. Returning to the United States, he was called to the chair of Paleontology at Yale University in 1866, which he retained till his death. In 1868 he made his first visit to the region of the Rocky Mountains, to study its inexhaustible fossil remains. Later he organized and conducted several scientific expeditions to that region. During 1882-99 he was vertebrate paleontologist for the United States geological survey. He discovered more than 1,000 new fossil vertebrates, more than half of which he classified and described. Among his more important finds were a sub-class of birds with teeth, which he named Odontornithes; two new classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new o
w classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new orders of dinosaurs, supposed to be the largest land animals yet discovered, etc. In 1877 he received the first Bigsby medal given by the Geological Society of London, and in 1898 the Cuvier prize of the French Academy of Sciences. In 1883-95 he was president of the National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of numerous scientific organizations. In 1898 he presented the collections of his lifetime to Yale University, ent of the National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of numerous scientific organizations. In 1898 he presented the collections of his lifetime to Yale University, and also gave his estate, having a supposed value of $150,000, to that institution. His publications include Odontornithes: a monograph on the extinct Toothed birds of North America; Dinocerata: a monograph of an extinct order of gigantic mammals; and The dinosaurs of North America. He died in New Haven, Conn., March 18, 1899.
0 new fossil vertebrates, more than half of which he classified and described. Among his more important finds were a sub-class of birds with teeth, which he named Odontornithes; two new classes of large mammals, the Tillodontia and Dinocerata; several new orders of dinosaurs, supposed to be the largest land animals yet discovered, etc. In 1877 he received the first Bigsby medal given by the Geological Society of London, and in 1898 the Cuvier prize of the French Academy of Sciences. In 1883-95 he was president of the National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of numerous scientific organizations. In 1898 he presented the collections of his lifetime to Yale University, and also gave his estate, having a supposed value of $150,000, to that institution. His publications include Odontornithes: a monograph on the extinct Toothed birds of North America; Dinocerata: a monograph of an extinct order of gigantic mammals; and The dinosaurs of North America. He died in New Haven, Conn.,
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