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Newman's Station (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 250 men, and killed or carried away about 1,000 mules. Pressing on, he struck and destroyed the Macon Railway at Lovejoy's at the appointed time; but Stoneman did not join him. Being hard pressed by Wheeler's cavalry, McCook turned to the southward and struck the West Point road again at Newman's Station. There he was met by a force of Mississippi infantry moving on Atlanta, and, at the same time, his rear was closely pressed by Confederate cavalry. He fought at great odds, but escaped with a loss of his prisoners and 500 of his own men. In 1865 he was brevetted major-general of volunteers: in 1866-69 was American minister to the Hawaiian Islands; and in 1870 was appointed governor of Colorado Territory.
Steubenville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
McCook, Edward Moody 1833- Military officer: born at Steubenville, O., June 15, 1833; a nephew of Major McCook. He was an active politician in Kansas, and was a member of its legislature in 1860. Edward M. McCook. He was an efficient cavalry officer during the Civil War, rising to the rank of brigadier-general in April, 1864. He was in the principal battles in Kentucky, Tennessee, and northern Georgia, and in the Atlanta campaign commanded a division and was distinguished for skill and bravery in quick movements. During the siege of Atlanta he was ordered to move out to Fayetteville and, sweeping round, join Stoneman—leading another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 2
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
McCook, Edward Moody 1833- Military officer: born at Steubenville, O., June 15, 1833; a nephew of Major McCook. He was an active politician in Kansas, and was a member of its legislature in 1860. Edward M. McCook. He was an efficient cavalry officer during the Civil War, rising to the rank of brigadier-general in April, 1864. He was in the principal battles in Kentucky, Tennessee, and northern Georgia, and in the Atlanta campaign commanded a division and was distinguished for skill and bravery in quick movements. During the siege of Atlanta he was ordered to move out to Fayetteville and, sweeping round, join Stoneman—leading another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 2
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
McCook, Edward Moody 1833- Military officer: born at Steubenville, O., June 15, 1833; a nephew of Major McCook. He was an active politician in Kansas, and was a member of its legislature in 1860. Edward M. McCook. He was an efficient cavalry officer during the Civil War, rising to the rank of brigadier-general in April, 1864. He was in the principal battles in Kentucky, Tennessee, and northern Georgia, and in the Atlanta campaign commanded a division and was distinguished for skill and bravery in quick movements. During the siege of Atlanta he was ordered to move out to Fayetteville and, sweeping round, join Stoneman—leading another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 2
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
McCook, Edward Moody 1833- Military officer: born at Steubenville, O., June 15, 1833; a nephew of Major McCook. He was an active politician in Kansas, and was a member of its legislature in 1860. Edward M. McCook. He was an efficient cavalry officer during the Civil War, rising to the rank of brigadier-general in April, 1864. He was in the principal battles in Kentucky, Tennessee, and northern Georgia, and in the Atlanta campaign commanded a division and was distinguished for skill and bravery in quick movements. During the siege of Atlanta he was ordered to move out to Fayetteville and, sweeping round, join Stoneman—leading another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
McCook, Edward Moody 1833- Military officer: born at Steubenville, O., June 15, 1833; a nephew of Major McCook. He was an active politician in Kansas, and was a member of its legislature in 1860. Edward M. McCook. He was an efficient cavalry officer during the Civil War, rising to the rank of brigadier-general in April, 1864. He was in the principal battles in Kentucky, Tennessee, and northern Georgia, and in the Atlanta campaign commanded a division and was distinguished for skill and bravery in quick movements. During the siege of Atlanta he was ordered to move out to Fayetteville and, sweeping round, join Stoneman—leading another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 2
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
see, and northern Georgia, and in the Atlanta campaign commanded a division and was distinguished for skill and bravery in quick movements. During the siege of Atlanta he was ordered to move out to Fayetteville and, sweeping round, join Stoneman—leading another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 250 men, and killed or carried away about 1,000 mules. Ps cavalry, McCook turned to the southward and struck the West Point road again at Newman's Station. There he was met by a force of Mississippi infantry moving on Atlanta, and, at the same time, his rear was closely pressed by Confederate cavalry. He fought at great odds, but escaped with a loss of his prisoners and 500 of his own
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
the principal battles in Kentucky, Tennessee, and northern Georgia, and in the Atlanta campaign commanded a division and was distinguished for skill and bravery in quick movements. During the siege of Atlanta he was ordered to move out to Fayetteville and, sweeping round, join Stoneman—leading another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 250 men, and killed or carried away about 1,000 mules. Pressing on, he struck and destroyed the Macon Railway at Lovejoy's at the appointed time; but Stoneman did not join him. Being hard pressed by Wheeler's cavalry, McCook turned to the southward and struck the West Point road again at Newman's Station. There he was met by a force of Mississi
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry mccook-edward-moody
g another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 250 men, and killed or carried away about 1,000 mules. Pressing on, he struck and destroyed the Macon Railway at Lovejoy's at the appointed time; but Stoneman did not join him. Being hard pressed by Wheeler's cavalry, McCook turned to the southward and struck the West Point road again at Newman's Station. There he was met by a force of Mississippi infantry moving on Atlanta, and, at the same time, his rear was closely pressed by Confederate cavalry. He fought at great odds, but escaped with a loss of his prisoners and 500 of his own men. In 1865 he was brevetted major-general of volunteers: in 1866-69 was American minister to the Hawai
shed for skill and bravery in quick movements. During the siege of Atlanta he was ordered to move out to Fayetteville and, sweeping round, join Stoneman—leading another cavalry raid—at Lovejoy's Station on the night of July 28. He and Stoneman moved simultaneously. McCook went down the west side of the Chattahoochee; crossed it on a pontoon bridge at Rivertown: tore up the track between Atlanta and West Point, near Palmetto Station: and pushed on to Fayetteville, where he captured 500 of Hood's wagons and 250 men, and killed or carried away about 1,000 mules. Pressing on, he struck and destroyed the Macon Railway at Lovejoy's at the appointed time; but Stoneman did not join him. Being hard pressed by Wheeler's cavalry, McCook turned to the southward and struck the West Point road again at Newman's Station. There he was met by a force of Mississippi infantry moving on Atlanta, and, at the same time, his rear was closely pressed by Confederate cavalry. He fought at great odds, bu
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