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Fort Edward (New York, United States) (search for this): entry mccrea-jane
was making his way to the Hudson River. Jane, a handsome young girl, was visiting friends at Fort Edward when the invaders approached. She was betrothed to a young Tory living near there, who was then in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jane in the house of her friend, and, seating her on a horse, attempted to carry her a prisoner to Burgoyne'sr lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward. Canada at the close of the war, and there lived, a moody bachelor, until he was an old man. the Indians, and cherished it as a precious treasure. Miss McCrea's, remains were buried at Fort Edward, and many years afterwards were transferred to a cemetery between Fort Edward and Sandy Hill.Fort Edward and Sandy Hill. The incident was woven into a wild tale of horror, which, believed, caused hundreds, perhaps thousands, of young men, burning with indignation against the British for employing savages to fight the
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry mccrea-jane
McCrea, Jane 1753- Historical character; born in Bedminster (now Lamington), N. J., in 1753. She was the victim of a tragedy that caused deep and wide-spread indignation in the colonies, while Burgoyne was making his way to the Hudson River. Jane, a handsome young girl, was visiting friends at Fort Edward when the invaders approached. She was betrothed to a young Tory living near there, who was then in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jane in the house of her friend, and, seating her on a horse, attempted to carry her a prisoner to Burgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullets fired at her captors pierced the maiden and she fell to the ground dead, on July 27, 1777. The Indians, seeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks into camp as a trophy. Her lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward
Hudson River (United States) (search for this): entry mccrea-jane
McCrea, Jane 1753- Historical character; born in Bedminster (now Lamington), N. J., in 1753. She was the victim of a tragedy that caused deep and wide-spread indignation in the colonies, while Burgoyne was making his way to the Hudson River. Jane, a handsome young girl, was visiting friends at Fort Edward when the invaders approached. She was betrothed to a young Tory living near there, who was then in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jane in the house of her friend, and, seating her on a horse, attempted to carry her a prisoner to Burgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullets fired at her captors pierced the maiden and she fell to the ground dead, on July 27, 1777. The Indians, seeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks into camp as a trophy. Her lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward.
Sandy Hill, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry mccrea-jane
ung Tory living near there, who was then in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jane in the house of her friend, and, seating her on a horse, attempted to carry her a prisoner to Burgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullets fired at her captors pierced the maiden and she fell to the ground dead, on July 27, 1777. The Indians, seeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks inwas an old man. He had purchased the scalp of his beloved from the Indians, and cherished it as a precious treasure. Miss McCrea's, remains were buried at Fort Edward, and many years afterwards were transferred to a cemetery between Fort Edward and Sandy Hill. The incident was woven into a wild tale of horror, which, believed, caused hundreds, perhaps thousands, of young men, burning with indignation against the British for employing savages to fight their brethren, to join the army of Gates.
McCrea, Jane 1753- Historical character; born in Bedminster (now Lamington), N. J., in 1753. She was the victim of a tragedy that caused deep and wide-spread indignation in the colonies, while Burgoyne was making his way to the Hudson River. Jane, a handsome young girl, was visiting friends at Fort Edward when the invaders eeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks into camp as a trophy. Her lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward. Canada at the close of the war, and there lived, a moody bachelor, until he was an old man. He had purchased the scalp of his beloved from the Indians, and cherished it as a precious treasure. Miss McCrea's, remains were buried at Fort Edward, and many years afterwards were transferred to a cemetery between Fort Edward and Sandy Hill. The incident was woven into a wild tale of horror, which, believed, caused hundreds, perhaps thousands, of young men, burning with indig
aracter; born in Bedminster (now Lamington), N. J., in 1753. She was the victim of a tragedy that caused deep and wide-spread indignation in the colonies, while Burgoyne was making his way to the Hudson River. Jane, a handsome young girl, was visiting friends at Fort Edward when the invaders approached. She was betrothed to a young Tory living near there, who was then in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jane in the house of her friend, and, seating her on a horse, attempted to carry her a prisoner to Burgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullBurgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullets fired at her captors pierced the maiden and she fell to the ground dead, on July 27, 1777. The Indians, seeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks into camp as a trophy. Her lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward. Canada at the close of the war,
nd wide-spread indignation in the colonies, while Burgoyne was making his way to the Hudson River. Jane, a handsome young girl, was visiting friends at Fort Edward when the invaders approached. She was betrothed to a young Tory living near there, who was then in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jane in the house of her friend, and, seating her on a horse, attempted to carry her a prisoner to Burgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullets fired at her captors pierced the maiden and she fell to the ground dead, on July 27, 1777. The Indians, seeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks into camp as a trophy. Her lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward. Canada at the close of the war, and there lived, a moody bachelor, until he was an old man. He had purchased the scalp of his beloved from the Indi
her a prisoner to Burgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullets fired at her captors pierced the maiden and she fell to the ground dead, on July 27, 1777. The Indians, seeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks into camp as a trophy. Her lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward. Canada at the close of the war, and there lived, a moody bachelor, until he was an old man. He had purchased the scalp of his beloved from the Indians, and cherished it as a precious treasure. Miss McCrea's, remains were buried at Fort Edward, and many years afterwards were transferred to a cemetery between Fort Edward and Sandy Hill. The incident was woven into a wild tale of horror, which, believed, caused hundreds, perhaps thousands, of young men, burning with indignation against the British for employing savages to fight their brethren, to join the army of Gates.
n in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jane in the house of her friend, and, seating her on a horse, attempted to carry her a prisoner to Burgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullets fired at her captors pierced the maiden and she fell to the ground dead, on July 27, 1777. The Indians, seeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks into camp as a trophy. Her lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward. Canada at the close of the war, and there lived, a moody bachelor, until he was an old man. He had purchased the scalp of his beloved from the Indians, and cherished it as a precious treasure. Miss McCrea's, remains were buried at Fort Edward, and many years afterwards were transferred to a cemetery between Fort Edward and Sandy Hill. The incident was woven into a wild tale of horror, which, believed,
McCrea, Jane 1753- Historical character; born in Bedminster (now Lamington), N. J., in 1753. She was the victim of a tragedy that caused deep and wide-spread indignation in the colonies, while Burgoyne was making his way to the Hudson River. Jane, a handsome young girl, was visiting friends at Fort Edward when the invaders approached. She was betrothed to a young Tory living near there, who was then in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jan1753. She was the victim of a tragedy that caused deep and wide-spread indignation in the colonies, while Burgoyne was making his way to the Hudson River. Jane, a handsome young girl, was visiting friends at Fort Edward when the invaders approached. She was betrothed to a young Tory living near there, who was then in Burgoyne's army. When that army was near Fort Edward some prowling Indians seized Jane in the house of her friend, and, seating her on a horse, attempted to carry her a prisoner to Burgoyne's camp at Sandy Hill. A detachment of Americans was sent to rescue her. One of a volley of bullets fired at her captors pierced the maiden and she fell to the ground dead, on July 27, 1777. The Indians, seeing her dead, scalped her and carried her glossy locks into camp as a trophy. Her lover, David Jones, shocked by the event, left the army, went to Grave of Jane McCrea, at Fort Edward.
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