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Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry mcdowell-battle-of
not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was startled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to it. Schenck (who ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Franklin, and the next day Jackson wrote to Ewell: Yesterday God gave us the victory at McDowell. The Nationals lost 256 men, of whom only nine were killed. Jackson reported a loss of 461, of whom seventy were killed. Among the latter was General Johnson.
Harrisonburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry mcdowell-battle-of
McDowell, battle of. General Banks with 5,000 men was at Harrisonburg, in the upper Shenandoah Valley, at the close of April, 1862, and Stonewall Jackson, joined by troops under Generals Ewell and Edward S. Johnson, had a force of about 15,000 men not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was startled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to it. Schenck (who ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Frankl
McDowell, battle of. General Banks with 5,000 men was at Harrisonburg, in the upper Shenandoah Valley, at the close of April, 1862, and Stonewall Jackson, joined by troops under Generals Ewell and Edward S. Johnson, had a force of about 15,000 men not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was startled by news tBanks. when he was startled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hasteneBanks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to it. Schenck (who ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Frank
Richard Stoddert Ewell (search for this): entry mcdowell-battle-of
risonburg, in the upper Shenandoah Valley, at the close of April, 1862, and Stonewall Jackson, joined by troops under Generals Ewell and Edward S. Johnson, had a force of about 15,000 men not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was tled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The lattel Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end t ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Franklin, and the next day Jackson wrote to Ewell: Yesterday God gave us the victory at McDowell. The Nationals lost 256 men, of whom only nine were killed. Jackson repo
McDowell, battle of. General Banks with 5,000 men was at Harrisonburg, in the upper Shenandoah Valley, at the close of April, 1862, and Stonewall Jackson, joined by troops under Generals Ewell and Edward S. Johnson, had a force of about 15,000 men not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was startled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to it. Schenck (who ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Fran
was at Harrisonburg, in the upper Shenandoah Valley, at the close of April, 1862, and Stonewall Jackson, joined by troops under Generals Ewell and Edward S. Johnson, had a force of about 15,000 men not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was startled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to wat west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May ilroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Franklin, and the next day Jackson wrote to Ewell: Yesterday God gave us the victory at McDowell. The Nationals lost 256 men, of y God gave us the victory at McDowell. The Nationals lost 256 men, of whom only nine were killed. Jackson reported a loss of 461, of whom seventy were killed. Among the latter was General Johnson.
McDowell, battle of. General Banks with 5,000 men was at Harrisonburg, in the upper Shenandoah Valley, at the close of April, 1862, and Stonewall Jackson, joined by troops under Generals Ewell and Edward S. Johnson, had a force of about 15,000 men not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was startled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to it. Schenck (who ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Frank
Robert Huston Milroy (search for this): entry mcdowell-battle-of
nder Generals Ewell and Edward S. Johnson, had a force of about 15,000 men not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was startled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to it. Schenck (who ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Franklin, and the next day Jackson wrote to Ewell: Yesterday God gave us the victory at McDowell. The Nationals lost 256 men, of whom only nine were killed. Jackson reported a lo
McDowell, battle of. General Banks with 5,000 men was at Harrisonburg, in the upper Shenandoah Valley, at the close of April, 1862, and Stonewall Jackson, joined by troops under Generals Ewell and Edward S. Johnson, had a force of about 15,000 men not far off. Jackson was closely watching Banks. when he was startled by news that General Milroy was approaching from Fremont's department, to join Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to it. Schenck (who ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Frankl
n Banks or fall upon Staunton. Leaving Ewell to watch the latter, he turned rapidly towards Staunton, and sent Johnson with five brigades to strike Milroy. The latter, outnumbered, fell back to McDowell, 36 miles west of Staunton, whither General Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade, to assist him. Jackson also hurried to the Stonewall Jackson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to ckson's letter to Ewell. assistance of Johnson, and on May 8 a severe engagement occurred, lasting about five hours, when darkness put an end to it. Schenck (who ranked Milroy), finding the position untenable, withdrew during the night to Franklin, and the next day Jackson wrote to Ewell: Yesterday God gave us the victory at McDowell. The Nationals lost 256 men, of whom only nine were killed. Jackson reported a loss of 461, of whom seventy were killed. Among the latter was General Johnson.
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