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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry ninegret
Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's quarters and demand of him the Pequods who had been put under him and the tribute still due; also a cessation of war upon the L
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry ninegret
Ninegret, Chief of the Narraganset Indians, and uncle of Miantonomoh (q. v.). He aided the English in the Pequod War (1637). Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret'
Ninegret, Chief of the Narraganset Indians, and uncle of Miantonomoh (q. v.). He aided the English in the Pequod War (1637). Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret'
Ninegret, Chief of the Narraganset Indians, and uncle of Miantonomoh (q. v.). He aided the English in the Pequod War (1637). Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). T commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves underction of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the paymed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's quarters and demand of him the Pequods who had been put under him and the cessation of war upon the Long Island Indians. On the approach of the troops, Ninegret fled to a distant swamp and was not pursued. Keeping aloof from King Philip's
Simon Willard (search for this): entry ninegret
1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's quarters and demand of him the Pequods who had been put under him and the tribute still due; also a cessation of war upon the Long Island Indians. On the approach of the troops, Ninegret fled to a distant swamp and was not pursued. Keeping aloof from King Philip's War, he escaped the ruin that fell upon other tribes.
Perce Indians (search for this): entry ninegret
gress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequr on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's quarters and demand of him the Pequods who had been put under him and the tribute still due; also a cessation of war upon the Long Island Indians. On the approach of the troops, Ninegret fled to a distant swamp and was not pursued. Keeping aloof from King Philip's War, he escaped the ruin that fell upon other tribes.
and uncle of Miantonomoh (q. v.). He aided the English in the Pequod War (1637). Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's quarters and demand of him the Pequods who had
Ninegret, Chief of the Narraganset Indians, and uncle of Miantonomoh (q. v.). He aided the English in the Pequod War (1637). Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's
Ninegret, Chief of the Narraganset Indians, and uncle of Miantonomoh (q. v.). He aided the English in the Pequod War (1637). Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's
Indians, and uncle of Miantonomoh (q. v.). He aided the English in the Pequod War (1637). Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's quarters and demand of him the Pequods