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Detroit (Michigan, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
Peace establishment. When the evacuation of the seaboard by the British was completed in November, 1783, the northern and western frontier posts continued to be held by British garrisons. These were Oswegatchie (now Ogdensburg), Oswego, Niagara, Presque Isle (now Erie), Sandusky, Detroit, Mackinaw, and some of lesser importance. The occupation of these posts by garrisons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furn
Ogdensburg (New York, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
Peace establishment. When the evacuation of the seaboard by the British was completed in November, 1783, the northern and western frontier posts continued to be held by British garrisons. These were Oswegatchie (now Ogdensburg), Oswego, Niagara, Presque Isle (now Erie), Sandusky, Detroit, Mackinaw, and some of lesser importance. The occupation of these posts by garrisons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furni
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
isons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenPittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furnish their quota of 700 twelve-months' men to do garrison duty. At the close of the War of 1812 President Madison proposed a military peace establishment of 20,000 men. When Congress considered it, the House of Representatives proposed 6.000, and the Senate proposed 15,000. There was a compromise, and 10,000 was the number agreed to. Two major-generals, four brigadierge
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
tion, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furnish their quota of 700 twelve-months' men to do garrison duty. At the close of the War of 1812 President Madison proposed a military peace establishment of 20,000 men. When Congress considered it, the House of Representatives proposed 6.000, and the Senate proposed 15,000. There was a compromise, and 10,000 was the number agreed to. Two major-generals, four brigadiergenerals, and the necessary staff, regimental, and company officers, were selected by the President from thos
Erie (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
Peace establishment. When the evacuation of the seaboard by the British was completed in November, 1783, the northern and western frontier posts continued to be held by British garrisons. These were Oswegatchie (now Ogdensburg), Oswego, Niagara, Presque Isle (now Erie), Sandusky, Detroit, Mackinaw, and some of lesser importance. The occupation of these posts by garrisons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furni
Sandusky (New York, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
Peace establishment. When the evacuation of the seaboard by the British was completed in November, 1783, the northern and western frontier posts continued to be held by British garrisons. These were Oswegatchie (now Ogdensburg), Oswego, Niagara, Presque Isle (now Erie), Sandusky, Detroit, Mackinaw, and some of lesser importance. The occupation of these posts by garrisons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furni
West Point (New York, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
e posts by garrisons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, howeWest Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furnish their quota of 700 twelve-months' men to do garrison duty. At the close of the War of 1812 President Madison proposed a military peace establishment of 20,000 men. When Congress considered it, the House of Representatives proposed 6.000, and the Senate proposed 15,000. There was a compromise, and 10,000 was the number agreed to. Two major-generals, fou
Oswego (New York, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
Peace establishment. When the evacuation of the seaboard by the British was completed in November, 1783, the northern and western frontier posts continued to be held by British garrisons. These were Oswegatchie (now Ogdensburg), Oswego, Niagara, Presque Isle (now Erie), Sandusky, Detroit, Mackinaw, and some of lesser importance. The occupation of these posts by garrisons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furni
Fort Niagara (New York, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
Peace establishment. When the evacuation of the seaboard by the British was completed in November, 1783, the northern and western frontier posts continued to be held by British garrisons. These were Oswegatchie (now Ogdensburg), Oswego, Niagara, Presque Isle (now Erie), Sandusky, Detroit, Mackinaw, and some of lesser importance. The occupation of these posts by garrisons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furn
Presque Isle (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry peace-establishment
Peace establishment. When the evacuation of the seaboard by the British was completed in November, 1783, the northern and western frontier posts continued to be held by British garrisons. These were Oswegatchie (now Ogdensburg), Oswego, Niagara, Presque Isle (now Erie), Sandusky, Detroit, Mackinaw, and some of lesser importance. The occupation of these posts by garrisons did not enter into the calculations for an immediate peace establishment at the close of the Revolution, and the military force retained was less than 700 men. These were under the command of Knox, and placed in garrison at West Point and Pittsburg. Even these were discharged very soon afterwards, excepting twenty-five men to guard the stores at Pittsburg and fifty-five for West Point. No officer above the rank of captain was retained in the service. It was provided, however, that whenever the western posts should be surrendered by the British, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania should furni
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