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Manila Bay (Philippines) (search for this): entry philippine-islands
12 hands high, possessing A native type. strength and endurance far beyond their size. Commerce and transportation. The internal commerce between Manila and the different islands is quite large, and is carried on almost entirely by water, in steamers of 500 to 1,000 tons. There are regular mail steamers once in two weeks on four routes—viz., northern Luzon, southern Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao; also a steamer every two months to the Carolines and Ladrones, and daily steamers on Manila Bay. These lines are all subsidized. To facilitate this navigation extensive harbor works have been in progress at Manila for several years, and a plan for lighting the coasts has been made, calling for forty-three principal lights, of which seventeen have already been constructed in the most substantial manner, besides sixteen lights of secondary importance. There is only one line of railway, built by English capital, running from Manila north to Dagupan, a distance of about 120 miles. T
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): entry philippine-islands
sentially popular in their form as fast as territory is held and controlled by our troops. To this end I am considering the advisability of the return of the commission, or such of the members thereof as can be secured, to aid the existing authorities and facilitate this work throughout the islands. To give effect to the intention thus expressed, I have appointed Hon. William H. Taft, of Ohio; Prof. Dean C. Worcester, of Michigan; Hon. Luke E. Wright, of Tennessee; Hon. Henry C. Ide, of Vermont; and Prof. Bernard Moses, of California, commissioners to the Philippine Islands to continue and perfect the work of organizing and establishing civil government already commenced by the military authorities, subject in all respects to any laws which Congress may hereafter enact. The commissioners named will meet and act as a board, and the Hon. William H. Taft is designated as president of the board. It is probable that the transfer of authority from military commanders to civil office
ensued for several days the American loss was fifty-seven killed and 215 wounded. Five hundred Filipinos were killed, 1,000 wounded, and 500 captured. Feb. 10. Battle of Caloocan. March 13-19. General Wheaton attacked and occupied Pasig. March 21-30. General MacArthur advanced towards and captured Malolos. Military operations were partially suspended during the rainy season. Meanwhile the southern islands were occupied by the American forces; Iloilo by General Miller, Feb. 11; Cebu by the Navy, March 27; and Negros, Mindanao, and the smaller islands subsequently. A treaty was concluded with the Sultan of Sulu, in which his rights were guaranteed, and he acknowledged the supremacy of the United States. With the advance of the dry season military operations on a much larger scale than heretofore were begun, the army of occupation having been reinforced by 30,000 men. April 4. The commission issued a proclamation promising The amplest liberty of self-government,
San Jacinto (Philippines) (search for this): entry philippine-islands
rcia, the chief Filipino insurgent in central Luzon, is captured. May 29. Insurgents capture San Miguel de Mayamo, five Americans killed, seven wounded, and Capt. Charles D. Reports made a prisoner. June 8. Gen. Pio del Pilar is captured at San Pedro Macati. June 12. General Grant reports the capture of an insurgent stronghold near San Miguel. June 21. General MacArthur issues a proclamation of amnesty. Nov. 14. Major Bell entered Tarlac. Nov. 14. Brisk fighting near San Jacinto. Maj. John A. Logan killed. Nov. 24. General Otis announced to the War Department that the whole of central Luzon was in the hands of the United States authorities; that the president of the Filipino congress, the Filipino secretary of state, and treasurer were captured, and that only small bands of the enemy were in arms, retreating in different directions, while Aguinaldo, a fugitive with a small escort, was being pursued towards the mountains. Nov. 24. Bautista, president of the
Balangiga (Philippines) (search for this): entry philippine-islands
nt McKinley's order establishing civil government and appointing William H. Taft the first governor. June 23. General MacArthur is succeeded by General Chaffee. July 4. Civil government established. July 24. General Zunbano with twenty-nine officers and 518 men surrender at Zabayas. Sept. 29. Massacre of forty-eight Americans at Balangiga, Samar. October. General Hughes, with a portion of the 9th United States Infantry, sent to Samar; burns Balangiga and pursues the insurgents.nt McKinley's order establishing civil government and appointing William H. Taft the first governor. June 23. General MacArthur is succeeded by General Chaffee. July 4. Civil government established. July 24. General Zunbano with twenty-nine officers and 518 men surrender at Zabayas. Sept. 29. Massacre of forty-eight Americans at Balangiga, Samar. October. General Hughes, with a portion of the 9th United States Infantry, sent to Samar; burns Balangiga and pursues the insurgents.
Samar (Philippines) (search for this): entry philippine-islands
e Mile. Luzon4,4003,426,00079 Panay4,700735,000155 Zebu2,400504,000210 Leyte3,800270,00071 Bohol1,300245,000188 Negros3,300242,00073 Mindanao34,000209,0006 Samar4,800186,00038 Mondoro4,00067,00017 Romblon60035,00058 Nasbate1,40021,00015 Nasbate—————————— Total104,7005,940,00057 The density of population in the six July 4. Civil government established. July 24. General Zunbano with twenty-nine officers and 518 men surrender at Zabayas. Sept. 29. Massacre of forty-eight Americans at Balangiga, Samar. October. General Hughes, with a portion of the 9th United States Infantry, sent to Samar; burns Balangiga and pursues the insurgents. July 4. Civil government established. July 24. General Zunbano with twenty-nine officers and 518 men surrender at Zabayas. Sept. 29. Massacre of forty-eight Americans at Balangiga, Samar. October. General Hughes, with a portion of the 9th United States Infantry, sent to Samar; burns Balangiga and pur
Singapore (Singapore) (search for this): entry philippine-islands
ok 80 per cent. and Egypt 10 per cent. of the leaf tobacco. Of the manufactured tobacco 70 per cent. goes to China and Singapore, 10 per cent. to England, and 5 per cent. to Spain. Cocoanuts are grown in southern Luzon, and are used in various wing most of the provinces of Luzon with Manila, and cables to the Visayas and southern islands and thence to Borneo and Singapore, as well as a direct cable from Manila to Hong-Kong. The land telegraph lines are owned by the government, and the cabrcelona, making the trip in about twenty-seven days; the same company also sends an intermediate steamer from Manila to Singapore, meeting the French Messageries steamer each way. There is also a non-subsidized line running from Manila to Hong-Kong mports.Exports. Spain10.52.9 Great Britain7.18.7 China4.66.8 Germany1.9 Saigon.9 United States.77.4 France.71.2 Singapore.41.7 Japan.21.2 Australia.12.6 Other countries1.5.6 ———— Total28.633.1 Next to Great Britain we are the larges
Cavite (Philippines) (search for this): entry philippine-islands
he races are of the Malay type. Around Manila there has been some mixture of Chinese and Spanish blood with that of the natives, resulting in the Mestizos, or half-breeds, but the number of these is not very great. As seen in the provinces of Cavite and Manila, the natives (Tagalos) are of small stature, averaging probably 5 feet 4 inches in height and 120 pounds in weight for the women. Their skin is coppery brown, somewhat darker than that of a mulatto. They seem to be industrious and the party of Americans held as prisoners by the Filipinos arrive at Manila. Jan. 12. A troop of the 3d Cavalry defeated the insurgents near San Fernando de la Union; the Americans lose two killed and three wounded. General Otis reports all of Cavite province as occupied by General Wheaton. Jan. 17. Lieutenant McRae, with a company of the 3d Infantry, defeated an insurgent force under General Hizon and captured rifles and ammunition near Mabalacat. Feb. 5. Five thousand Filipino insurge
San Mateo (Philippines) (search for this): entry philippine-islands
es. Dec. 4. Vigan, held by American troops under Lieutenant-Colonel Parker, attacked by 800 Filipinos; they are driven off, leaving forty killed and thirty-two prisoners; the Americans lose eight men. Dec. 11. General Tierona, the Filipino insurgent commander in Cagayan, surrenders the entire province to Captain McCalla, of the Newark. Dec. 11. The President directed General Otis to open the ports of the Philippines to commerce. Dec. 19. General Lawton was killed in attacking San Mateo. Jan. 22, 1901. Treaty with Spain for the purchase of the island of Cibutu and Cagayan for $100,000 ratified by United States Senate. Jan. 28. Petition from Filipino federal party praying for civil government presented to the Senate. March 1. Twenty-one officers and 120 bolomen surrender. March 23. Aguinaldo captured by General Funston. April 2. Aguinaldo takes oath of allegiance. April 20. General Tinio surrendered. June 15. United States Philippine Commission ap
0021,00015 Nasbate—————————— Total104,7005,940,00057 The density of population in the six first islands named is nearly 50 per cent. greater than in Illinois and Indiana (census of 1890), greater than in Spain, about one-half as great as in France, and onethird as great as in Japan and China. Various smaller islands, including the Carolines, Ladrones, and Palaos, carry the total area and Christian population to: Area, 140,000; population, 6,000,000; per square mile, 43. This is consint. in German. The value of the commerce with other countries in 1894 was as follows: (In millions of dollars, silver.) Countries.Imports.Exports. Spain10.52.9 Great Britain7.18.7 China4.66.8 Germany1.9 Saigon.9 United States.77.4 France.71.2 Singapore.41.7 Japan.21.2 Australia.12.6 Other countries1.5.6 ———— Total28.633.1 Next to Great Britain we are the largest consumers of the products of the Philippines, and they export to us nearly three times as
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