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Pleasant Hill, battle of. When it was discovered that the Confederates were following the Nationals in strong force after the battle at Pleasant Grove, Banks formed a battle-line at Pleasant Hill, 15 miles east of the latter place, with Emory's division in the front, the right occupied by Dwight's brigade, another, under General Millan, in the centre, and a third, under Colonel Benedict, on the left. A New York battery was planted on a commanding hill. The army trains, guarded by Lee's ccountercharge by Smith's veterans, under General Mower. The right of the Confederates was driven more than a mile by this charge. Then the whole of Smith's reserves were ordered up, when the Confederates were routed and pursued until dark. General Banks reported his losses in the battles of April 7, 8, and 9, at 3,969, of whom 289 were killed and 2,150 missing, most of the latter taken prisoners. The Nationals had also lost, thus far, twenty pieces of artillery, 160 wagons, and 1,200 horses
on the left. A New York battery was planted on a commanding hill. The army trains, guarded by Lee's cavalry, a brigade of colored troops, and Ransom's shattered columns, were sent some distance on the road towards Grand Ecore. Towards noon (April 9), the Confederate advance appeared, and between 5 and 6 P. M. a furious battle began. The assailants fell heavily on Emory's left, held by Benedict's brigade, with crushing force, and pushed it back. At the first onset, and while trying to ralight of the Confederates was driven more than a mile by this charge. Then the whole of Smith's reserves were ordered up, when the Confederates were routed and pursued until dark. General Banks reported his losses in the battles of April 7, 8, and 9, at 3,969, of whom 289 were killed and 2,150 missing, most of the latter taken prisoners. The Nationals had also lost, thus far, twenty pieces of artillery, 160 wagons, and 1,200 horses and mules. They had captured 2,300 prisoners, twenty-five ca
rst onset, and while trying to rally his men to charge, Benedict was slain by a bullet which passed through his head. While the left was giving way, and the Confederates had captured four guns, Emory's right stood firm until enveloped on three sides by a superior force, when it fell back a little. Then the tide was changed by a heavy countercharge by Smith's veterans, under General Mower. The right of the Confederates was driven more than a mile by this charge. Then the whole of Smith's reserves were ordered up, when the Confederates were routed and pursued until dark. General Banks reported his losses in the battles of April 7, 8, and 9, at 3,969, of whom 289 were killed and 2,150 missing, most of the latter taken prisoners. The Nationals had also lost, thus far, twenty pieces of artillery, 160 wagons, and 1,200 horses and mules. They had captured 2,300 prisoners, twenty-five cannon (chiefly by the fleet), and 3,000 bales of cotton. The Confederate losses were never reported.
rst onset, and while trying to rally his men to charge, Benedict was slain by a bullet which passed through his head. While the left was giving way, and the Confederates had captured four guns, Emory's right stood firm until enveloped on three sides by a superior force, when it fell back a little. Then the tide was changed by a heavy countercharge by Smith's veterans, under General Mower. The right of the Confederates was driven more than a mile by this charge. Then the whole of Smith's reserves were ordered up, when the Confederates were routed and pursued until dark. General Banks reported his losses in the battles of April 7, 8, and 9, at 3,969, of whom 289 were killed and 2,150 missing, most of the latter taken prisoners. The Nationals had also lost, thus far, twenty pieces of artillery, 160 wagons, and 1,200 horses and mules. They had captured 2,300 prisoners, twenty-five cannon (chiefly by the fleet), and 3,000 bales of cotton. The Confederate losses were never reported.
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